Intel Z370 Motherboard Roundup

This roundup of Intel Z370 Coffee Lake motherboards pulls from our in-depth reviews, and includes recommendations for gaming, value & overall performance.

Intel's Z370 was designed to support Coffee Lake processors, which have more cores than their Kaby Lake predecessors. Z370's featureset is essentially identical to Z270, and both chipsets are designed for the LGA1151 socket, but Z370 utilizes an updated power design to ensure stability for the more powerful CPUs. This change in power regulation, however, prevents Skylake and Kaby Lake processors from working on Z370 motherboards, despite sharing the same socket design.

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Intel Z370 Motherboards

11/30/2017 Update: original publication; we'll be updating this article every time we review an Intel Z370 motherboard.

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Because Coffee Lake processors have more cores and require more power, the need for a strong power delivery system has also proportionally increased. Our reviews of some Z370 motherboards have shown temps on voltage regulators are significantly higher than on Z270 motherboards. If a board lacks proper cooling, it could cause thermal throttling on high-end Coffee Lake processors.

Memory support will also be a key spec to watch on Z370 motherboards. Z370's memory support is essentially the same as its predecessor, but with six cores and 12 threads, the amount of bandwidth available to each core has been reduced. The additional cores more than make up for any negative impacts this may have, but selecting a motherboard that supports DDR4 at high frequencies will help to ensure your system works at peak efficiency.

EATX Intel Z370 Motherboards

MORE: AMD X370 Motherboard Roundup

ATX Intel Z370 Motherboards

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MORE: Intel Z270 Motherboard Roundup

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  • 0451
    I can never seem to find the next page on these long articles. There are only 4 boards on the first page.
  • Crashman
    Anonymous said:
    I can never seem to find the next page on these long articles. There are only 4 boards on the first page.
    Yes, that's because of all the Z370's tested, only four won awards :D
  • Tanyac
    Why do manufacturers insist on using the E2500 Killer Hype NIC... The Intel NIC "Kill" the Killer LAN ports any day (Pun intended).

    MSI Boards may have 10 4-pin fan headers but when you read the manual at least half of them only have 3 pins connected.
  • P1nky
    A came here for a roundup. All I see is 3 cards. What?!
  • Pixel13
    @Crashman: I see 3, not 4, and only one of the three seems to have earned an award. As well, the title of the "Round Up" has nothing in it, nor is there anything in the text, about "award-winning". Either someone left something out or this ain't what it claims to be.
  • SR-71 Blackbird
    Best deal for your dollar would be the ASROCK Z370 Extreme 4.
  • Crashman
    Anonymous said:
    @Crashman: I see 3, not 4, and only one of the three seems to have earned an award. As well, the title of the "Round Up" has nothing in it, nor is there anything in the text, about "award-winning". Either someone left something out or this ain't what it claims to be.
    Dang, it looks like the rest are still in queue for publishing at a later date. Yes, I just checked. Seeing that, I probably would have skipped the Z370 version this month. Then again, I think they're added to the list live, so maybe they were trying to get ahead of those...
  • tsnor
    At least they call it "roundup" now instead of "best MB...". Big step in the right direction. I'll be grabbing a z370 MB shortly, but am looking at the $100-$150 price point to match with a non-OC i5-8400. If you see any good (or bad) ones there a heads up would be nice.
  • SR-71 Blackbird
    ASROCK Z370 Extreme 4...This is what I just used for my 8400 build for my youngest son.
  • kcscouler
    The Gaming 7 review redirects to a Godlike Gaming review.
  • kcscouler
    The Gaming 7 review redirects to the Godlike Gaming review. Has been like that forever.
  • Crashman
    Anonymous said:
    The Gaming 7 review redirects to the Godlike Gaming review. Has been like that forever.
    OH, the link at the TOP of the page. I was clicking the other link and going to the right review. I'll let MJ know.
  • zach.hillerson
    Is it a big deal that the gaming 7 isn't efficient on a stock clock? I'm planning an 8600k build and will probably run stock clock for a while, but want the ability to oc later. Due to rebates and sales, it's available locally for $169, which seems like a solid day real against that price group.
  • Crashman
    Anonymous said:
    Is it a big deal that the gaming 7 isn't efficient on a stock clock? I'm planning an 8600k build and will probably run stock clock for a while, but want the ability to oc later. Due to rebates and sales, it's available locally for $169, which seems like a solid day real against that price group.
    Well, since I'm using an average of idle and max, it might not be all that apparent to you. That is, unless you're doing similarly-intense workloads 12 hours a day and leaving the system idle the other 12.

    What I'm saying is that your level of workload is your own, I have no way to calculate your personal cost.
  • zach.hillerson
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    Is it a big deal that the gaming 7 isn't efficient on a stock clock? I'm planning an 8600k build and will probably run stock clock for a while, but want the ability to oc later. Due to rebates and sales, it's available locally for $169, which seems like a solid day real against that price group.
    Well, since I'm using an average of idle and max, it might not be all that apparent to you. That is, unless you're doing similarly-intense workloads 12 hours a day and leaving the system idle the other 12.

    What I'm saying is that your level of workload is your own, I have no way to calculate your personal cost.



    This is my first build, so it's all new to me. I am hoping to spend a few hours each evening playing mostly iracing and some other gaming and light office use, and it will sit idly the rest of the time. Is the inefficiency something that is due to the cost of the motherboard or something that actually impacts performance when not pushing the cpu to the limits?

    I was torn between this and the AsRock Extreme 4 and locally, due to a sale, they are priced the same. This seems to be from the next tier up, but being my first build, it is a new world for me.

    Thanks!
  • Crashman
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    Is it a big deal that the gaming 7 isn't efficient on a stock clock? I'm planning an 8600k build and will probably run stock clock for a while, but want the ability to oc later. Due to rebates and sales, it's available locally for $169, which seems like a solid day real against that price group.
    Well, since I'm using an average of idle and max, it might not be all that apparent to you. That is, unless you're doing similarly-intense workloads 12 hours a day and leaving the system idle the other 12.

    What I'm saying is that your level of workload is your own, I have no way to calculate your personal cost.



    This is my first build, so it's all new to me. I am hoping to spend a few hours each evening playing mostly iracing and some other gaming and light office use, and it will sit idly the rest of the time. Is the inefficiency something that is due to the cost of the motherboard or something that actually impacts performance when not pushing the cpu to the limits?

    I was torn between this and the AsRock Extreme 4 and locally, due to a sale, they are priced the same. This seems to be from the next tier up, but being my first build, it is a new world for me.

    Thanks!

    In your situation the idle number is closer to what you'll actually experience in CPU power consumption. You can find that, along with some game tests, in the full review.

    Your graphics card will determine things of its own (additional power, potential FPS).
  • SR-71 Blackbird
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    Is it a big deal that the gaming 7 isn't efficient on a stock clock? I'm planning an 8600k build and will probably run stock clock for a while, but want the ability to oc later. Due to rebates and sales, it's available locally for $169, which seems like a solid day real against that price group.
    Well, since I'm using an average of idle and max, it might not be all that apparent to you. That is, unless you're doing similarly-intense workloads 12 hours a day and leaving the system idle the other 12.

    What I'm saying is that your level of workload is your own, I have no way to calculate your personal cost.



    This is my first build, so it's all new to me. I am hoping to spend a few hours each evening playing mostly iracing and some other gaming and light office use, and it will sit idly the rest of the time. Is the inefficiency something that is due to the cost of the motherboard or something that actually impacts performance when not pushing the cpu to the limits?

    I was torn between this and the AsRock Extreme 4 and locally, due to a sale, they are priced the same. This seems to be from the next tier up, but being my first build, it is a new world for me.

    Thanks!



    Built 2 with the Asrock Extreme 4 , great board for the price and feature rich.
    Here's the one I built for my youngest son!
  • zach.hillerson
    Is that the Cryorig H7? I have been debating between that and the Noctua 14. It seems like the Noctua might be more efficient with the larger fan. I have 2 140mm Noctuas for the front of the case and 1-120mm for the exhaust.

    I've read great things about both motherboards. For essentially the same cost - is there a reason to go for the Extreme 4 over the typically more expensive Aorus 7?
  • zach.hillerson
    Anonymous said:


    The microcenter an hour away has it for $229 with a $30 rebate and $30 discount of you buy a CPU at the same time. They don't carry the AsRock.

    Does price dictate performance? As mentioned, it is my first build, so I am not sure I grasp the differences between the Gaming 7 and the Extreme 4. Perhaps they both would suit my needs...

    Any comments or help would be greatly appreciated...I'm confused.