EVGA BQ Series 850W PSU Review

Performance, Performance Per Dollar, Noise, And Efficiency Ratings

Performance Rating

The following graph illustrates the 850 BQ's total performance rating, comparing it to other units we have reviewed. To be more specific, the tested unit is shown as 100 percent, and every other unit's performance is shown relative to it.

Click Here To See More ResultsClick Here To See More Results

EVGA's overall relative score is pretty low, mostly because of loose load regulation and increased ripple on the minor rails, along with the 3.3V rail's poor response to transient loads. 

Performance Per Dollar

The following chart may be the most interesting to many of you because it depicts the unit's performance-per-dollar score. We looked up the current price of each PSU on popular online shops and used those prices and all relative performance numbers to calculate the index. If the specific power supply wasn't available in the United States, we searched for it in popular European Union shops, converting the listed price to USD (without VAT). Note that all of the numbers in the following graph are normalized by the rated power of each PSU.  

Click Here To See More ResultsClick Here To See More Results

EVGA's asking price is pretty affordable, so the 850 BQ's performance per dollar score is only a little lower than the CX750M's.

Noise Rating

The graph below depicts the cooling fan's average noise over the PSU's operating range, with an ambient temperature between 28°C and 30°C (82°F to 86°F).

Click Here To See More ResultsClick Here To See More Results

The 850 BQ is noisy, no doubt about it. This is a great shame because, with a lower minimum fan speed, it could be much quieter.

Efficiency Rating

The following graph shows the PSU's average efficiency throughout its operating range, with an ambient temperature between 28°C and 30°C.

Click Here To See More ResultsClick Here To See More Results

Efficiency lands in the 80 PLUS Bronze region, unsurprisingly. If you need higher efficiency, then you have no other option but to invest in a Gold-rated unit. Of course, that's going to cost more, too.

25 comments
    Your comment
  • joz
    At $85 I can get a G2 650W; or even a G2750W on sale.
  • Metteec
    Thanks for the review. Looks like I will be avoiding this one.
  • Metteec
    Also, for $20 more, you can pick up an equivalent gold rated PSU or maybe even a platinum one on sale and after rebates. It is the halcyon days for competition in quality PSUs.
  • _TheD0ct0r_
    1547864 said:
    Thanks for the review. Looks like I will be avoiding this one.


    Why is that?
  • Metteec
    @_THEDICTOR_, for $85, there are so many other better options. EVGA could have been more competitive model if they made quieter version. Instead, you get a PSU with fixed cables, low efficiency, high power variances, and noise like a mini-vacuum. While the higher quality capacitors and warranty are nice, the lack of utility does not make this a good value. 3-years ago, this would have been a great PSU, but times have changed. It is a great day to buy a PSU, just not this one.
  • MasterMace
    appears to be another terrible unit. I'll have to read back and see if it's an Andyson or a HEC
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Considering the OEM is HEC , not surprised by this review.
  • Nuckles_56
    I would have thought that EVGA could have pushed HEC a bit harder and got a much better unit out of them than this
  • lunyone
    I would personally like to see more 450-550w PSU reviews, not the cherry picked and delivered 750w+ ones that seem to make the rounds. It is just that most people are only going to need 450-550w PSU's for their 1 dGPU based systems.
  • Aris_Mp
    This is not a cherry-picked sample. It comes directly from a store shelf and not from EVGA.

    As for more 450-550W PSU reviews, I am currently working on a 500W unit (which however isn't affordable).
  • logainofhades
    Given the fact that a B2 850 is selling for a couple dollars less, there is no reason to even think about this BQ.
  • lunyone
    1903369 said:
    This is not a cherry-picked sample. It comes directly from a store shelf and not from EVGA. As for more 450-550W PSU reviews, I am currently working on a 500W unit (which however isn't affordable).


    So is all of your reviews come from a retail purchase, or are there some delivered from whichever vendor? Just curious, because I remember reading not too long ago that pretty much all of the products had been items that were submitted from whichever vendor. So I'm guessing that 90-95% of reviews come from vendor delivered samples or am I wrong in that assumption? I'm just curious and not trying to be a troll or anything like that. I think it would be beneficial if the viewer knew whether or not the sample was purchased or offered/delivered from said vendor.
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    The samples come direct from the Manufacturer.
  • lunyone
    276663 said:
    The samples come direct from the Manufacturer.


    Yes I understand that. Aris_MP stated that it came from the Store shelf, so I was trying to get an idea on how many items have been purchased from a Store shelf compared to the ones that the Manufacturer delivers to the reviewer.
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Most of the time , with most reviews they aren't off the shelf , this is rare , they are sampled direct.
  • Aris_Mp
    Like in almost all product reviews, PSU samples come directly from the manufacturer, which also provides support in case the product breaks down (something that is very easy to happen in a PSU review). Besides a huge budget buying the products from a store would also mean no support in case the PSU dies, since its warranty is voided the moment I set it on my test bench.
  • lunyone
    1903369 said:
    Like in almost all product reviews, PSU samples come directly from the manufacturer, which also provides support in case the product breaks down (something that is very easy to happen in a PSU review). Besides a huge budget buying the products from a store would also mean no support in case the PSU dies, since its warranty is voided the moment I set it on my test bench.


    So the units that you get from the Manufacturer could be cherry picked, even though they still cover any/all issues during the review, which is the point that I was trying to make about getting units that aren't always indicative of what a consumer would experience from buying the product. Not saying this is bad, just pointing it out.
  • Aris_Mp
    yes they could. But this doesn't mean that every manufacturer does that. Even if you buy samples there is always the possibility for changes in the manufacturing line and the next batch to be worse (or better). So you never know.

    Personally I rely on my experience, knowledge and connections to find out not-proper (AKA Golden) samples. There are times that even my readers provide useful tips. E.g. when they do notice a different part in their PSU and report it. This is why I fully break apart every PSU (and all the rest samples in the sites I work for) during a review, a procedure that takes many hours and can be quite hard some times (for instance when you have to fight with Enhance Electronics' huge heatsinks).
  • lunyone
    Oh I understand your troubles that you have to go through. I think it would be more fair, if the manufacturer would allow you to purchase their product from a retail store of your choice and offer the same support throughout your review period. Of coarse re-reimburse you for the cost of the purchase price. This would show the viewer/reader what kind of experience/product that one would expect if they went out and bought said product. I know it isn't going to happen that way, but I feel that would be the best of both worlds. You (the reviewer) would get the support you need from the manufacturer and the viewer/reader would know that the reviewer had purchased the product locally (if possible) and this would reflect a more realistic review of a retail sample.
  • madmatt30
    I don't get it at all.
    While not an inherently bad unit it just seems completely pointless really.
    The fsp made gq850 is just better & its the same price.
    I can understand evga using hec for the budget orientated b1 series but not 850w modular units that are aimed at higher end users.
  • logainofhades
    1031363 said:
    I don't get it at all. While not an inherently bad unit it just seems completely pointless really. The fsp made gq850 is just better & its the same price. I can understand evga using hec for the budget orientated b1 series but not 850w modular units that are aimed at higher end users.


    Yea, when they already had the superflower built B2.
  • Marcus52
    I don't know why EVGA would even consider offering this kind of product. They're supposed to stand for quality, not cheap.
  • Nuckles_56
    59887 said:
    1031363 said:
    I don't get it at all. While not an inherently bad unit it just seems completely pointless really. The fsp made gq850 is just better & its the same price. I can understand evga using hec for the budget orientated b1 series but not 850w modular units that are aimed at higher end users.
    Yea, when they already had the superflower built B2.

    Probably because they are about to discontinue to SF built B2 in favor of this unit
  • logainofhades
    Which would be a horrible idea, as the SF built unit is a far better.