Patriot Viper LED 16GB DDR4-3600 C16 Dual-Channel Kit Review: Top-Notch Single-Rank RAM

Patriot Memory’s Viper LED might not play to the RGB crowd, but its choice of red or white diffuser tops over monochromatic LEDs can still add flair to your system. More important, it’s a Viper product, designed for performance. The appearance may be good, but it’s still a secondary concern.

We said "choice," but the DDR4-3600 and DDR4-3200 versions only come in white. Builders who prefer DDR4-3000 or DDR4-2666 get the red version. The only crossover point between its red and white models is at DDR4-2400, which probably won’t interest a lot of enthusiasts.

The firm drummed up a little excitement by sending us its top-model PVLW416G360C6K. That model number breaks down to mean Patriot Viper LED White, DDR4, 16GB, 3600, CAS 16Kit. It includes two 8GB DIMMs, two case stickers, and well-wishes for your overclocking endeavors.

Drop it in your machine, and you’ll find the Viper LED automatically configured as DDR4-2133 CAS 15. Enabling XMP allows it to reach its full DDR4-3600 data rate at 16-18-18-36 timings using 1.35V.

All Patriot DRAM is covered by its lifetime replacement limited warranty.


Comparison Products

It would be fair to compare the Viper LED DDR4-3600 of today’s review to other kits in the enthusiast range, from DDR4-3200 to DDR4-3866. But we’re throwing in a set of DDR4-3000 anyway, just to be fair to all the companies that have already lost to that kit. The difference is its dual-rank organization (i.e., both sides filled), which allows two modules to satisfy Intel’s memory-controller preference for four ranks. Dual-rank 8GB modules are disappearing from the market as the 4Gb ICs used to fill them are replaced with 8Gb ICs, and soon the only options to reach four ranks will be to use four 8GB or two 16GB modules.


We’re expanding outward from our Corsair DDR4-4600 review by switching to a board that supports four DIMMs. MSI’s Z370 Godlike Gaming doesn’t have any memory-overclocking advantages of the smaller board used in that review, but it has similar performance scaling and can push several of our kits past DDR4-4000. We’re also retaining the hardware from its review, including its GeForce GTX 1080 card and Toshiba/OCZ NVMe SSD.

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MORE: All Memory Content

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  • Lucky_SLS
    Great article and nice set of performance metrics!

    Wouldn't it make more sense to test these high speed rams in a ryzen ecosystem? Or is 3600 and above still not stable there?
  • alextheblue
    2381310 said:
    Great article and nice set of performance metrics! Wouldn't it make more sense to test these high speed rams in a ryzen ecosystem? Or is 3600 and above still not stable there?

    You're better off waiting for Ryzen+ when it comes to higher-speed RAM, especially pushing above 3600. Personally I'd be perfectly happy if your typical 3600 kit ran fine out of the box with the flip of an XMP profile switch. An X470/Ryzen+ rig may very well be my next build, if board prices are reasonable.
  • Karadjgne
    I've been running my Patriot Intel Extreme Masters 1866MHz for years, nice and stable at 2400MHz. Not too shabby for a 1600MHz default ram. I find it funny that as well known as Patriot is, for anything from SSDs to USB sticks to ram, the only ram ppl are sticking too is g-skill and corsair. Lifetime warranty is a bonus, the ram works very well, it's compatibility is no different than any other vendor and Patriot Elite was my goto of choice for early Ryzens as it worked, where others didn't.

    Kudos to Patriot... Again.
  • Nintendork
    Why don't you test memos on Ryzen, is the only platform that is sensible to ram speed and latency because of the way they are designed, it's pretty much worthless to do it on an intel setup.
  • Nintendork
    @alextheblue
    Current Ryzen goes well with 3600+ ram, thing is reviewers and techtubers are not caring about using those 4200+ kits to see the limits of Ryzen controller.

    3600 CL15 would be awesome (downclocking a 4000+ premium kit).

    The most I saw was from some small youtuber gettomg a 3600kit and going 3466 CL14, massive improvement on Ryzen even after 3200 CL14.
  • Crashman
    205977 said:
    @alextheblue Current Ryzen goes well with 3600+ ram, thing is reviewers and techtubers are not caring about using those 4200+ kits to see the limits of Ryzen controller. 3600 CL15 would be awesome (downclocking a 4000+ premium kit). The most I saw was from some small youtuber gettomg a 3600kit and going 3466 CL14, massive improvement on Ryzen even after 3200 CL14.
    You're on the right track, we're trying to compare a full range of RAM all the way up to DDR4-4200 on a single platform.
  • BaRoMeTrIc
    The lighting looks horrible, it's not even throughout the top of the heatspreader. In 2018 if you are going to make LED make it RGB, and make it multizone RGB with vibrant and even lightning. If you cannot do this, then dont even bother with LEDs, Focus on a sleek and modern heatspreader design for minimalist builds. Too many products out there with lackluster LED lightning and RGB lighting, Really all they do is make your build an eye sore. I would rather see this heat spreader with a nice piece of brushed aluminum down the middle, or even a sandblasted aluminum. The LED just kills it for me.