Patriot Viper LED 16GB DDR4-3600 C16 Dual-Channel Kit Review: Top-Notch Single-Rank RAM

Benchmark Results & Final Analysis

The Z370 Godlike Gaming is turning out to be far worse at configuring memory outside its SPD table than we originally thought, as the Viper LED DDR4-3600 is the second kit that it couldn’t “guess” a workable timing set for to run either DDR4-2666 or DDR4-2400. The same board does a great job configuring above-XMP settings without significant performance impact, which is the reason it was picked for this task.

Lowest Stable Timings at 1.35V (Max) on MSI Z370 Godlike Gaming (BIOS A.30)

 

DDR4-4000

DDR4-3733

DDR4-3200

DDR4-2666

DDR4-2400

Patriot Viper LED 16GB
PVLW416G360C6K

X

18-19-19-38 (2T)

15-16-16-32 (1T)

X

X

G.Skill Ripjaws V 16GB
F4-3200C16D-16GVKB

X

X

15-16-16-32 (1T)

13-13-13-28 (1T)

11-11-11-28 (1T)

G.Skill Trident Z 16GB
F4-3866C18D-16GTZ

18-18-18-36 (2T)

16-17-17-34 (2T)

14-14-14-28 (2T)

12-12-12-28 (1T)

11-11-11-28 (1T)

Super Talent 16GB
F3200UX16G

X

17-19-19-38 (2T)

14-16-16-32 (1T)

X

X

T-Force Dark ROG 16GB
TDRRD416G3000HC16CDC

X

X

16-17-17-34 (1T)

13-14-14-28 (1T)

12-13-13-28 (1T)


Patriot’s Viper LED DDR4-3600 does scale up to DDR4-3733, so we’ll include those results in today’s charts, along with the XMP and DDR4-3200 results. Having the same lowest-stable timings at DDR4-3200 as G.Skill’s DDR4-3200, we’re keenly interested in how the secondary and tertiary timings we didn’t choose will separate the two kits in our benchmarks.

The Viper LED’s DDR4-3771 capability earns it overclocking cred. The older DDR4-3200 modules that hit 3808 are getting hard to find, and we can’t live too far in the past. (We must forget them when they’re gone.)

The Viper LED’s mic drop comes when it matches G.Skill’s DDR4-3866 Sandra Memory Bandwidth at XMP settings, then blows past it at DDR4-3733. If your system turns out not to be so friendly to those high data rates, its DDR4-3200 performance edges out that of the Ripjaws V.

We probably shouldn’t be surprised that the DDR4-3200 kits have lower DDR4-3200 latency than the Viper LED DDR4-3600, since faster memory uses looser secondary and tertiary timings to maintain stability. We should probably throw a game at this kit and see what happens.

F1 2015 gets a big boost from the Viper LED’s combination of frequency and timings, even surpassing the XMP settings of the old dual-rank DIMMs. The dual-rank kit edges ahead, barely, at optimized DDR4-3200 timings.

Metro only faults slow RAM, and we haven’t included any in today’s test. The Viper LED does well, for what it’s worth in this bench.

Blender’s another application that really only weeds out slow RAM. We include these to show readers how most applications will respond to their enthusiast-class purchase.

Lower is better in timed apps, and once again the Viper LED edges out the otherwise superb dual-rank DIMMs. Manual tuning helps the dual-rank kit take the win, for those who are adept to both find and tune it.

The penalty for performance in the case of the Viper LED DDR4-3600 kit is around $40, pulling it down in the performance-per-dollar chart. The winning kits are in short supply, however, and don’t even have those LEDs (if you want them). That said, the Viper LED kit has the best performance of any single-rank modules we’ve tested, usually beating the barely available dual-rank modules, and will continue to be a good choice long after those dual-rank DIMMs are gone.

MORE: Best Memory

MORE: DDR DRAM FAQs And Troubleshooting Guide

MORE: All Memory Content

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  • Lucky_SLS
    Great article and nice set of performance metrics!

    Wouldn't it make more sense to test these high speed rams in a ryzen ecosystem? Or is 3600 and above still not stable there?
  • alextheblue
    2381310 said:
    Great article and nice set of performance metrics! Wouldn't it make more sense to test these high speed rams in a ryzen ecosystem? Or is 3600 and above still not stable there?

    You're better off waiting for Ryzen+ when it comes to higher-speed RAM, especially pushing above 3600. Personally I'd be perfectly happy if your typical 3600 kit ran fine out of the box with the flip of an XMP profile switch. An X470/Ryzen+ rig may very well be my next build, if board prices are reasonable.
  • Karadjgne
    I've been running my Patriot Intel Extreme Masters 1866MHz for years, nice and stable at 2400MHz. Not too shabby for a 1600MHz default ram. I find it funny that as well known as Patriot is, for anything from SSDs to USB sticks to ram, the only ram ppl are sticking too is g-skill and corsair. Lifetime warranty is a bonus, the ram works very well, it's compatibility is no different than any other vendor and Patriot Elite was my goto of choice for early Ryzens as it worked, where others didn't.

    Kudos to Patriot... Again.
  • Nintendork
    Why don't you test memos on Ryzen, is the only platform that is sensible to ram speed and latency because of the way they are designed, it's pretty much worthless to do it on an intel setup.
  • Nintendork
    @alextheblue
    Current Ryzen goes well with 3600+ ram, thing is reviewers and techtubers are not caring about using those 4200+ kits to see the limits of Ryzen controller.

    3600 CL15 would be awesome (downclocking a 4000+ premium kit).

    The most I saw was from some small youtuber gettomg a 3600kit and going 3466 CL14, massive improvement on Ryzen even after 3200 CL14.
  • Crashman
    205977 said:
    @alextheblue Current Ryzen goes well with 3600+ ram, thing is reviewers and techtubers are not caring about using those 4200+ kits to see the limits of Ryzen controller. 3600 CL15 would be awesome (downclocking a 4000+ premium kit). The most I saw was from some small youtuber gettomg a 3600kit and going 3466 CL14, massive improvement on Ryzen even after 3200 CL14.
    You're on the right track, we're trying to compare a full range of RAM all the way up to DDR4-4200 on a single platform.
  • BaRoMeTrIc
    The lighting looks horrible, it's not even throughout the top of the heatspreader. In 2018 if you are going to make LED make it RGB, and make it multizone RGB with vibrant and even lightning. If you cannot do this, then dont even bother with LEDs, Focus on a sleek and modern heatspreader design for minimalist builds. Too many products out there with lackluster LED lightning and RGB lighting, Really all they do is make your build an eye sore. I would rather see this heat spreader with a nice piece of brushed aluminum down the middle, or even a sandblasted aluminum. The LED just kills it for me.