Huawei's MatePad Pro hides an unknown Kirin 9000W

HiSilicon
(Image credit: HiSilicon)

Last August Huawei surprised the industry by launching its HiSilicon Kirin 9000S smartphone processor presumably made by Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp. (SMIC) using its 2nd generation 7nm-class process technology. Since then, another Kirin 9006C chip showed up, though this one was allegedly made by TSMC years ago. This week a yet another HiSilicon system-on-chip — the Kirin 9000W — transpired.

The eight-core HiSilicon Kirin 9000W powers Huawei's MatePad Pro 13.2-inch tablet, which is evidently aimed at the high-end of the market, given its display size and a relatively high price of over $1000. Huawei's Kirin 9000W-based tablets are currently available in Malaysia, Indonesia, and Saudi Arabia, as reported by HuaweiCentral. Meanwhile, there are versions of the MatePad Pro 13.2-inch device that are equipped with the Kirin 9000S processor. 

The main difference between Huawei's Kirin 9000W-based tablets and Kirin 9000S-based tablets is the lack of 4G/LTE connectivity on the former and lack of cellular capabilities of the latter. So, it is possible that the Kirin 9000W application processor comes with disabled built-in modem.  

Huawei does not reveal the specifications of its Kirin 9000W system-on-chip, so we can only wonder how it differs from the Kirin 9000S SoC. Keeping in mind that the Kirin 9000W has the same number of general-purpose cores as the original Kirin 9000 (made by TSMC on its 5nm-class fabrication technology in 2020) and the Kirin 9000S (made by SMIC on its 2nd generation 7nm-class production node in 2023), we are probably dealing with a processor that derives from either of the said chips.

Given the fact that the Huawei MatePad Pro 13.2-inch tablet is clearly aimed at demanding users, we would not expect the HiSilicon Kirin 9000W to be a significantly cut-down version of the Kirin 9000S or the Kirin 9000 (apart from the supposedly disabled modem hardware). In fact, it is reasonable to expect the Kirin 9000W to actually have a higher thermal envelope than the Kirin 9000S or the Kirin 9000 as at the end of the day it is designed for tablets (which tend to have better heat dissipation than handsets), not smartphones. Meanwhile, if this is the case, it does not explain why some versions of the Huawei MatePad Pro 13.2-inch tablet are powered by the Kirin 9000S made by SMIC.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • Lucky_SLS
    Thinks about "9000W" chip without context XD
    Reply
  • JeffreyP55
    Admin said:
    Huawei MatePad 13.2-inch tablet uses unknown HiSilicon Kirin 9000W processor.

    Huawei's MatePad Pro hides an unknown Kirin 9000W : Read more
    75 amps to burn your house down. Chinese marketing nomenclature has a lot to be desired. P/E. 9000w/120v..
    Reply
  • derekullo
    One of the new features of the chip is arc welding!

    75 amps is in the range for some types of welding!
    Reply
  • evdjj3j
    derekullo said:
    One of the new features of the chip is arc welding!

    75 amps is in the range for some types of welding!
    A 105w processor at 1.4 v would draw 75 amps, not uncommon to draw much more than that in a desktop CPU.
    Reply
  • JeffreyP55
    evdjj3j said:
    A 105w processor at 1.4 v would draw 75 amps, not uncommon to draw much more than that in a desktop CPU.
    You will never draw a full 105w under normal circumstances. PC would not last long under full bore conditions. My 5950x never gets close to it's burn a hole in the motherboard "I" draw. Better have a 2000w power supply....
    Reply
  • TJ Hooker
    JeffreyP55 said:
    You will never draw a full 105w under normal circumstances. PC would not last long under full bore conditions. My 5950x never gets close to it's burn a hole in the motherboard "I" draw. Better have a 2000w power supply....
    What do you consider "normal circumstances"? Even if we limit ourselves to consumer parts, you can easily get modern, high end (or even mid range) CPUs to draw 105+ W doing things like rendering, encoding, etc., and they can run like that indefinitely. So long as you have a good motherboard and cooling, you aren't going to burn anything out.

    Edit: Including your own 5950X: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-9-5950x-5900x-zen-3-review/4
    Reply
  • evdjj3j
    JeffreyP55 said:
    You will never draw a full 105w under normal circumstances. PC would not last long under full bore conditions. My 5950x never gets close to it's burn a hole in the motherboard "I" draw. Better have a 2000w power supply....
    13900K draws 295w in Blender at stock settings no OC. Also not sure why you would need a 2000W PSU to power 105w.

    https://gamersnexus.net/cpus/intels-300w-core-i9-14900k-cpu-review-benchmarks-gaming-power
    Reply
  • JeffreyP55
    evdjj3j said:
    13900K draws 295w in Blender at stock settings no OC. Also not sure why you would need a 2000W PSU to power 105w.

    https://gamersnexus.net/cpus/intels-300w-core-i9-14900k-cpu-review-benchmarks-gaming-power
    I was being sarcastic. You will never draw full current unless you are doing weird things to the BIOS. Storage drives and peripherals are nominal. I bought a 1200w PSU a few years back. People thought I was crazy. Better be a quality supply with room to move. 1200w doesn't sound so crazy today does it? A quality supply could last 10 years. That is where some people miss the boat. First and foremost you start with good power distribution, the heart of a PC. Then build your killer machine.
    Reply
  • Geef
    Presses power button on phone. 📳 (hears noise from Back To The Future speaker scene as he turns it on.)
    Reply
  • jp7189
    JeffreyP55 said:
    You will never draw a full 105w under normal circumstances. PC would not last long under full bore conditions. My 5950x never gets close to it's burn a hole in the motherboard "I" draw. Better have a 2000w power supply....
    I have had a 12900k which would happily eat 300w continously. The z690 aorus master that I used had 22 x 105A power stages. Not that that CPU can handle 2200 amps, but the motherboard power delivery is designed to that spec. 75amps is nothing at all.

    At this moment, I have a 7950x that's been burning 200+ w continously for the last ~36 hours.

    I have never had a CPU failure, and I would like to say that's from keeping things cool with water, but even with water that 12900k was constantly bumping 100c thermal limits.
    Reply