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New AMD Turks, Caicos Cards Heading to OEMs

Although AMD hasn't announced anything official, the company is reportedly now offering three new Radeon HD 6000 cards to OEMS only, two based on the "Turks" GPU and the third based on the "Caicos" GPU.

According to the report, AMD's 40-nm Turks mid-level GPU uses 480 VLIW5 stream processors, a 128-bit GDDR5 memory controller, and offers support for DirectX 11 and DDR3 on lower SKUs. Turks is available on two OEM cards as listed below:

Radeon HD 6670

  • 480 stream processors
  • 24 texture units
  • 800 MHz core
  • 1000 MHz (4.00 GHz GDDR5 effective) memory
  • 64 GB/s memory bandwidth
  • 512 MB or 1 GB memory
  • Full-height design with a single-slot fan-based heatsink

Radeon HD 6570

  • 480 stream processors
  • 24 texture units
  • 650 MHz core
  • 900 MHz (1.80 GHz DDR3 effective) memory @ 28.8 GB/s OR
  • 1000 MHz (4.00 GHz GDDR5 effective) memory @ 64 GB/s bandwidth
  • Up to 2 GB using DDR3 memory
  • Up to 1 GB using GDDR5 memory
  • Low-profile design

As for AMD's entry-level Caicos GPU, it serves as a step up from an integrated graphics processor, packing 160 VLIW5 stream processors and a 64-bit memory controller supporting GDDR5 and DDR3. This GPU is used on the Radeon HD 6450 as shown below:

Radeon HD 6450

  • 8 texture units
  • Option to set CPU clock from 625 MHz to 750 MHz
  • Option to set DDR3 memory clock from 533 MHz to 800 MHz
  • Option to set GDDR5 memory from 800 MHz to 900 MHz
  • 512 MB or 1 GB DDR3/GDDR5 memory
  • A low profile, passively cooled design

As previously stated, currently all three cards are available only to OEMs. However, all three are expected to filter through the retail channels within the coming weeks, so stay tuned for release dates and pricing.

  • ang1dust
    Been waiting fror these to make a Home Entertainment Computer
    Reply
  • mister g
    Since when did cards go through OEMs and then to consumers? Hopefully they'll release a more powerful replacement of the 5770.
    Reply
  • mindless728
    missing the SP count from the 6450 at 160SP's?
    Reply
  • dkant1n
    ang1dustBeen waiting fror these to make a Home Entertainment Computer+1
    I would like to see some benchs on the 6450 with passive cooling
    Reply
  • nforce4max
    Unimpressed but hey upgrades for some.
    Reply
  • dalauder
    mister gHopefully they'll release a more powerful replacement of the 5770.Radeon said that the 5770 wouldn't be replaced immediately--that's why they didn't use the 6700 series and used the confusing 6800 name a while back. Besides a 5850 is down to the release price of a 5770. And that's a powerful card.
    Reply
  • Travis Beane
    dalauderRadeon said that the 5770 wouldn't be replaced immediately--that's why they didn't use the 6700 series and used the confusing 6800 name a while back. Besides a 5850 is down to the release price of a 5770. And that's a powerful card.Powerful, but not quite.
    I had both a 5770 and 4670, and I loved them. Performance is nice, but I'd rather not wake the neighbor.
    Reply
  • nezzymighty
    Has anyone heard of an All-in-Wonder coming soon? Maybe because of Fusion, AMD doesn't want to integrate graphics with tuners any longer.
    Reply
  • nforce4max
    NezzyMightyHas anyone heard of an All-in-Wonder coming soon? Maybe because of Fusion, AMD doesn't want to integrate graphics with tuners any longer.
    Nope sadly, the last AIW that I remember floating around was a 3650/70 and that was some years ago and haven't seed a 4k or 5k series AIW either. Amazed how quickly old AIW x1900 sells on the second hand market.
    Reply
  • dalauder
    Anyone notice that the only difference between the 6670 and 6570 (stat wise and assuming both are the GDDR5 version) is a 650MHz versus 800MHz core clock? And they both use the same Turks GPU. The only way an overclocked 6570 wouldn't match an OC'd 6670 is if they are actually binned based on performance (although AMD barely does that) or if they're heat limited.
    Reply