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Report: Haswell Included GT3e IGP Will Perform Like GT640

The folks over at VR-Zone have managed to get ahold of one of Intel's slides regarding the HD Graphics lineup. Based on what it shows, the performance that we can expect from some of the IGP might actually be good. According to the slide, the best Intel HD Graphics part, the HD 5200 (GT3e), might actually slightly outperform the GT640.

What we already know is that the HD 5200 GPU, otherwise known as the GT3e part, would reside in a number of mobile Haswell CPUs as well as three of the desktop Haswell CPUs. The Desktop CPUs that will carry this GT3e part will be named with an "*R", as can be seen in the list below. Not only this, but the "*R" named CPUs will likely have a BGA (Ball Grid Array) socket instead of the LGA (Land Grid Array) socket.

ModelCore / ThreadsBase / TurboL3 CacheGPUMemoryTDPMSRP
Core i7-4770R4 / 83.2 / 3.9 GHz6 MBHD 52001300 MHz65 W?
Core i5-4670R4 / 43.0 / 3.7 GHz4 MBHD 52001300 MHz65 W?
Core i5-4570R4 / 42.7 / 3.2 GHz4 MBHD 52001150 MHz65 W?

The mobile parts that will make use of the GT3 (not necessarily the better GT3e) are listed below. All of these chips are likely to be used only in Ultrabooks.

  • Core i3-4158U (5100, GT3)
  • Core i5-4250U (5000, GT3) 
  • Core i5-4258U (5100, GT3)
  • Core i5-4288U (5100, GT3)
  • Core i7-4550U (5000, GT3)
  • Core i7-4558U (5100, GT3)

So far, this is all we know. While we're waiting for Computex, be sure to have a look at our rumor roundup of all the rumors and facts that we know regarding the Haswell CPUs.

  • ssdpro
    Since there is a 4770R with GT3e does that mean my 4770K with GT2 will be significantly cheaper? No?
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    10745407 said:
    Since there is a 4770R with GT3e does that mean my 4770K with GT2 will be significantly cheaper? No?
    Since -R models are non-overclockable and will likely be BGAs soldered on motherboards, it skips the socket and dumps warranty liability costs on the motherboard manufacturers' shoulders so I would actually expect the -Rs to be a fair bit cheaper than -Ks and possibly even non-K models.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    Shame they don't have GT3e available in a cheaper dual core model. Be ideal for a Media Centre PC with MadVR.
    Reply
  • Meanbob
    How does this stack up against AMD's APU's?
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    10745560 said:
    How does this stack up against AMD's APU's?
    If you look at Intel's slides, Intel compares GT3e to AMD's HD6670 and Nvidia's GT640, which should put it at least on par with AMD's most powerful APUs for 2013.
    Reply
  • When integrated graphics surpass my 2 680s or next gen 780 when it comes this will interest me a gt640 is subpar in my book. So this isnt news. I game at 2560 x 1600, only top end. But a Haswell 4770k will be my next CPU.
    Reply
  • Zagen30
    10745644 said:
    When integrated graphics surpass my 2 680s or next gen 780 when it comes this will interest me a gt640 is subpar in my book. So this isnt news. I game at 2560 x 1600, only top end. But a Haswell 4770k will be my next CPU.
    Just because you aren't the intended market doesn't mean this isn't newsworthy. A lot of Nvidia and AMD's sales come from low-end GPUs; while the profit margins are much lower, they probably make more money overall on the 640s and 6670s of the world. Intel becoming an increasing threat in that market segment is newsworthy.
    Reply
  • jaguarskx
    I would take that slide with a large grain of salt.. or just chug down all the salt in a salt shaker.

    While the Intel HD 4000 more powerful than the Radeon HD 5450 (Intel HD 3000 equivalent), it is less powerful than a Radeon HD 5550. It probably has around 90% the performance of the Radeon HD 5550 on average. The last I've heard, the HD 4600 is estimated to be 20% more powerful than the HD 4000. However, that still means it is less powerful than a Radeon HD 5570. I would place the Intel HD 4600 about half way in between the Radeon HD 5550 and HD 5570. Maybe a little closer to the Radeon HD 5570, but not by very much.

    The Radeon HD 6570 is roughly 35% more powerful than the Radeon HD 5570. Therefore, attempting to compare the Intel HD 4600 to a Radeon HD 6570 is misleading to say the least. This is assuming the estimated 20% increase in performance is true. However, in order for the Intel HD 4600 to be comparable to the Radeon HD 6570, the increase in performance from the HD 4000 will have to be significant.

    Let's just say that the Intel HD 4000 is equal to the Radeon HD 5550 for argument sake... The difference in performance between a Radeon HD 5550 to the Radeon HD 6570 is probably about 60% - 65%. Naturally, since the Intel HD 4000 is slower than the Radeon HD 5550, the increase in performance will need to be more than 65%.

    While not in this article, Intel had another slide stating that the iGPU in Haswell is up to 2x more powerful than Ivy Bridge (meaning 100% more powerful than the Intel HD 4000), then that means Intel's HD 5200 GT3e (HD 5200 + eDRAM = Crystalwell) with double the number of shaders compared to the Intel HD 4600, plus up to 128MB of eDRAM will only be a minor improvement over the Intel HD 4600. If the Intel HD 4600 has to have over a 65% performance increase to match a Radeon HD 6570, then there is not much more room for a performance increase if the Intel HD 5200 GT3e is supposed to be up to 100% more powerful than Ivy Bridge's HD 4000.
    Reply
  • dragonx47
    Well, certainly welcome news. Good to see that Intel is finally offering competition against AMD in the integrated graphics sector, assuming the report is true.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    10745793 said:
    Just because you aren't the intended market doesn't mean this isn't newsworthy. A lot of Nvidia and AMD's sales come from low-end GPUs; while the profit margins are much lower, they probably make more money overall on the 640s and 6670s of the world. Intel becoming an increasing threat in that market segment is newsworthy.
    Exactly.

    GT3e is not intended to replace over-powered multi-GPU setups - as a BGA chip, it will most likely end up in devices where discrete GPUs are not even possible such as NUC, pico-ITX and embedded form factors. It is intended to vastly increase the number of situations where IGPs provide more than sufficient performance.

    The high-performance gaming/professional GPU market is less than 10% of consumer PC sales. IGPs are intended for the other 90+%.
    Reply