Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

AMD's Entry Level Radeon HD 7790 Revealed

By - Source: Hardware.info, Guru3D | B 61 comments

AMD provides details on the Bonnaire XT based HD 7790.

As was rumoured last month, AMD will be releasing the entry-level Radeon HD 7790 graphics card to bridge the gap between the HD 7770 and HD 7850. The HD 7790 will feature 786 shader processors instead of the previously indicated 896, a clock rate of 1075 MHz and 2 GB of GDDR5 memory over a 128-bit interface and support DirectX 11.1 and OpenGL 4.3. According to a now redacted result posted on CL benchmark's website, the HD 7790 can be expected to provide 10 percent lower performance than a HD 7850.

Interestingly, the HD 7790 is actually based on the 28 nm Bonnaire XT chip and uses the GCN 2.0 architecture that will also be used in the upcoming Radeon HD 8000 series. For an explanation of AMD's somewhat confusing naming conventions, refer to both our coverage of the HD 8000 series delay and the overview of AMD's plans for 2013.

The Radeon HD 7790 has a recommended price of £118 and will be available in April 2013.

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

Display 61 Comments.
This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 23 Hide
    Yuka , March 11, 2013 12:56 PM
    It's the 4770 all over again! That's actually a good thing!

    Cheers!
  • 17 Hide
    madjimms , March 11, 2013 12:49 PM
    madjimms22nm? saweet! Is lower power consumption something we can assume?

    Looking at the Wiki page comparing AMD graphics cards I see that even the 8XXX series is only 28nm.

    What gives?
  • 15 Hide
    madjimms , March 11, 2013 12:45 PM
    22nm? saweet! Is lower power consumption something we can assume?
Other Comments
  • 15 Hide
    madjimms , March 11, 2013 12:45 PM
    22nm? saweet! Is lower power consumption something we can assume?
  • 2 Hide
    de5_Roy , March 11, 2013 12:46 PM
    shame on you amd for confusing customers with your sku-ing. if it's a 22nm gcn 2.0 card, it belongs to a seperate series.
    no, rebadging it when new lineup comes out doesn't make it any better. :( 
  • 17 Hide
    madjimms , March 11, 2013 12:49 PM
    madjimms22nm? saweet! Is lower power consumption something we can assume?

    Looking at the Wiki page comparing AMD graphics cards I see that even the 8XXX series is only 28nm.

    What gives?
  • 10 Hide
    bigshootr8 , March 11, 2013 12:49 PM
    It will be interesting to see how it places itself pricing wise. Even with the article suggesting 118 you can get at the lowest I'm seeing now 125 for 7850 in £.
  • -4 Hide
    blazorthon , March 11, 2013 12:51 PM
    That memory would have to be clocked pretty high to keep performance only 10% lower than the 7850. It's probably running at 1.5GHz, if not higher.
  • 15 Hide
    blazorthon , March 11, 2013 12:52 PM
    Rick_CriswellI would assume poor yeilds again.First time ever to release the low level cards first.


    That's possible, but even if true, I highly doubt that poor yields are the only reason for not releasing high end cards yet. AMD has little reason to release high-end cards in a time where they'd be difficult to really stress and most gamers who'd consider buying them would probably wait until there's more reason to upgrade. It'd take more sense to release them later when they'll be in greater demand and that gives AMD more time for improvement too.

    It most certainly wouldn't be the first time that AMD introduced lower end cards first.
  • 10 Hide
    rgd1101 , March 11, 2013 12:56 PM
    Rick_CriswellI would assume poor yeilds again.First time ever to release the low level cards first.

    They been doing that for a while, new architecture on lower end first before higher end.
  • 23 Hide
    Yuka , March 11, 2013 12:56 PM
    It's the 4770 all over again! That's actually a good thing!

    Cheers!
  • 15 Hide
    Jarred Ibarra , March 11, 2013 12:59 PM
    If it is 22nm, then this card will play the same role as the Radeon 4770- a run on a new process to learn from and work out the kinks for the later 8000 series cards.
  • 2 Hide
    tipoo , March 11, 2013 1:05 PM
    That's got to be 28nm, unless Intel is fabbing it (which ain't gonna happen, otherwise we would have heard of it).
  • -5 Hide
    heero yuy , March 11, 2013 1:10 PM
    how does the AMD graphics card naming work? I know with NVidia the 600 series is the latest and the 690 is the most powerful but amd confuses the hell outa me
  • 4 Hide
    bgunner , March 11, 2013 1:12 PM
    Jarred IbarraIf it is 22nm, then this card will play the same role as the Radeon 4770- a run on a new process to learn from and work out the kinks for the later 8000 series cards.


    If this is the case then this could explain them pushing back the release date of the 8000 series.
  • 15 Hide
    blazorthon , March 11, 2013 1:26 PM
    heero yuyhow does the AMD graphics card naming work? I know with NVidia the 600 series is the latest and the 690 is the most powerful but amd confuses the hell outa me


    Nvidia is no less guilty of confusing things than AMD. For example, several of their low end 600 series cards have Fermi GPUs (from the GTX 400 and 500 series) and even more confusing, some of them are die-shrunk Fermi.

    Nvidia's GTX 650 is literally just a GT 640 with GDDR5 memory and a higher GPU frequency. The GT 650M is a GT 640. the GTX 660M is a GTX 650. There are three different types of OEM GT 640 cards, at least one of which is a Fermi model desptie having the exact same name as the Kepler models and there are similar situations with some of their higher end cards.

    Point is that both AMD and Nvidia do these tricks. A famous example is how many times Nvidia reused their G92 GPU. A similar example for AMD could include their Redwood GPU.
  • -7 Hide
    childofthekorn , March 11, 2013 1:27 PM
    soldier2013Because those on welfare need GPUs too...


    I lol'd
  • 1 Hide
    festerovic , March 11, 2013 1:27 PM
    These are not the cards you're looking for /waves hand.
  • 14 Hide
    m32 , March 11, 2013 1:31 PM
    22nm? That'd be an shocker. I didn't think we would see them till next year. This is just going to give us a taste of the real dish.

    de5_Royshame on you amd for confusing customers with your sku-ing. if it's a 22nm gcn 2.0 card, it belongs to a seperate series.no, rebadging it when new lineup comes out doesn't make it any better.


    Your actually getting an better product and you _itch.
  • 11 Hide
    Borisblade7 , March 11, 2013 1:31 PM
    heero yuyhow does the AMD graphics card naming work? I know with NVidia the 600 series is the latest and the 690 is the most powerful but amd confuses the hell outa me


    AMD works exactly the same as nvidia, higher number indicates more powerful card in each respective series. So 7000 series and 7980 is the most powerful single chip card. Nvidia is in fact more confusing since they add in "ti" and other suffixes that mean its a step up from that specific model but not as good as the next one up. Aka 650
  • 7 Hide
    CarolKarine , March 11, 2013 1:34 PM
    heero yuyhow does the AMD graphics card naming work? I know with NVidia the 600 series is the latest and the 690 is the most powerful but amd confuses the hell outa me


    bigger numbers are better. same as Nvidia. it's just there are more numbers...

    anyways, the first number "_XXX" is the number of the series. the second number "X_XX" is the subseries (this generally depicts the GPU inside. for example, the 7970 and 7950 have tahiti GPU's, the 7870 and 7850 are on pitcairn, and the lower cards are based on the cape verde processor. this card, as mentioned, is based on a new GPU, which is on GCN 2.0 - probably an early run to see real-world performance specs and ready drivers for higher end cards) the third number "XX_X" tells you which cards are in what order in the subseries (7750 is below 7770, 7850 is below 7870, 7950 is below 7970, so on so forth) the "9" digit at the end is reserved for a dual-gpu card (6990, third party 7990s)

    a few exceptions to the rules I put out above: the 7870 XT should really be a 7930, as per naming rules. (it's better than the 7870, and runs on the tahiti core, but it's below the 7930)

    basically, bigger numbers are better. the first number denotes the series, the second number denotes performance range (7 being an entry-level card, 8 being mid-range, 9 being enthusiast or high-end) and the third number tells you the order in that performance range.

    make sense?
Display more comments