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Pricing And Pros

Hi-Rely RAIDFrame: External Disk-To-Disk Backup Via eSATA
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As tested, the manufacturer’s suggested retail price on the RAIDFrame Backup System comes out to $9,409:

  • $3,664: One RAIDFrame chassis (single eSATA multiplier configuration)
  • $5,650: Five RAIDPacs
  1. Two RAIDPacs with 1.5TB drives ($1,019 each)
  2. Three RAIDPacs with 1TB drives ($1,204 each)
  3. One eSATA add-in card ($95)

You can also get the RAIDFrame chassis in a two- or five-channel configuration for $3,986 or $4,236, respectively. RAIDPacs are available with smaller 500GB drives priced at $714.

As with High Rely's other products, each item comes with an 18 month warranty. Optional three and five year extended warranties are also available for the RAIDFrame chassis and the RAIDPacs. Pricing for the latter depends on the disk drive size ordered, and can range from $143 to $482 per RAIDPac. The three and five year warranties for the RAIDFrame chassis depend on the number of channels you get. Single-channel RAIDFrame warranties start at $733 for three years and can reach up to $1,694 for a five-channel RAIDFrame’s five year warranty.

Pros

The first reason to like the RAIDFrame are its removable RAIDPacs. Not only can you remove and store them off-site, but in case of a disaster, you can connect the RAIDPac to a different computer over its SATA interface. The RAIDPacs are small enough to carry by hand, and can provide quick recovery if you should lose your home base and/or your RAIDFrame chassis.

The second positive aspect of the the RAIDFrame is in its construction. Though I had a problem with a loose Molex connector, the chassis and the RAIDPacs are solid overall. I’d say about 95% of the overall product is metal with plenty of screws to keep it together. If you don’t mind the additional work the extra screws present as you break down certain components, the RAIDPacs will prove to be very sturdy. The metallic sleeve around the RAIDPac fits nice and snug. Once inserted into the RAIDFrame slot, the RAIDPac’s fit is well-engineered enough to prevent them from easily sliding out.

The last pro I would mention are the available optional configurations you can choose for the chassis and RAIDPacs. There are one-, two-, and five-channel configurations you can purchase for the RAIDFrame to back up both single and multiple computers over eSATA. The RAIDPacs themselves are easily configurable for RAID 0 or RAID 5 via a jumper sitting on the back of each cartridge. You just need to reposition the jumper, pop the RAIDPac back into the RAIDFrame and wait while the drive reinitializes. 

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