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How to Bypass Windows 11's TPM Requirement and Upgrade from Windows 10

How to Bypass Windows 11's TPM Requirement
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Microsoft has some strict hardware requirements that your PC must meet to install Windows 11, including TPM 2.0 support. This means that not only older computers, but virtual machines will refuse to upgrade from Windows 10, giving you a message that "this PC doesn't currently meet Windows 11 system requirements." 

In fact, if you already have installed Windows 11 in a virtual machine, you may not be able to update to the latest build because Windows Update will tell you that your system doesn't meet requirements. But even if your host computer supports TPM, your VM software may not.

Fortunately, there is a simple way you can prevent the Windows Update or the Windows 11 installer from requiring TPM. A simple, open-source script called Universal MediaCreationTool by a user named Aveyo will bypass the TPM-checker and allow you to upgrade, using Microsoft's own installers. Below, we'll explain how to use it.

Note that Microsoft also has created an official registry hack to bypass TPM 2.0 and CPU requirements. However, this method still requires at least TPM 1.2 so, if you have no TPM at all, it's worthless. We'll talk about this at the bottom, in case you want to try it..

How to Bypass Windows 11's TPM Requirement

1. Navigate to the Github page for Aveyo's open-source Universal MediaCreationTool You actually don't need the whole tool, just the script for skipping TPM checks.

2. Scroll down to "Skip_TPM_Check_on_Dynamic_Update_v2.cmd"

3. Select and copy all the code for that file only.

copy code

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

4. Open Notepad and paste the code into it.

paste code into notebpad

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

5. Save the file as disable-tpm-check.cmd to your desktop.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

6. Double click the file to run it.

7. Click Yes when asked whether to allow Windows PowerShell to make changes to your device.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

You'll see PowerShell open with the note "Skip TPM Check on Dynamic Update [Installed]." Note that if you run it again, it will re-enable TPM check.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

After this, if you are in the Insider Program, Windows update will start downloading Windows 11 and install it. If you are already running Windows 11 and have been denied an update, that will download.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

If you are not in the Insider program, you can upgrade to the new OS by downloading a Windows 11 ISO file, writing it to a USB drive or optical disc and running the setup.exe file from within Windows 10.

How to Bypass TPM When Clean Installing Windows 11

If you plan to do a clean install rather than an upgrade to Windows 11 and bypass TPM, you'll need an installation disk or ISO file that has TPM detection disabled. Fortunately, AveYo's Universal MediaCreationTool has you covered there too as it can generate Windows 11 ISOs or USB sticks that don't check your TPM status.

1. Navigate to the MediaCreationTool Github page.

2. Download the zip file by clicking Download Zip in the upper right corner of the page.

Download Zip

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

3. Extract MediaCreationTool.bat from the zip file and save it to the folder of your choice.

4. Run MediaCreationToolbat. If Windows flags the file as potentially dangerous, click "More info" and "Run anyway."

click more info

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

click Run Anyway

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

5. Select 11 as the MCT version.

(Image credit: Future)

6. Select either "Create USB" or "Create ISO," depending on whether you want an ISO file or to create a bootable USB stick. If you're installing on a virtual machine, you'll want the ISO file.

(Image credit: Future)

7. Click Yes when asked by Windows whether to allow Power Shell to open an app. Windows media creation tool will launch. Don't be fooled because the title bar says "Windows 10 setup" as it will create you a Windows 11 ISO, provided that you choose 11.

(Image credit: Future)

8. Select USB flash drive or ISO file when prompted.

(Image credit: Future)

9. Select which USB drive or file location (for the ISO) you want.

(Image credit: Future)

The Media Creation Tool will now take several minutes downloading Windows 11 from Microsoft's servers and creating either a bootable USB Flash drive or an ISO file. The tool may say "Downloading Windows 10," but don't be fooled by that. 

(Image credit: Future)

10. Boot from the installation media or ISO file you created. You should be able to install Windows 11, even though your PC or VM doesn't support TPM.

How to Bypass Windows 11 TPM the Official Microsoft Way

Knowing that some users will want to install Windows 11 on systems that don't meet all of its hardware requirements, Microsoft has provided a registry hack that loosens them up somewhat. Using this hack, you can install on a system that has at least TPM 1.2 and has an unsupported CPU. That said, we recommend the scripts above because they don't require you to have TPM of any kind.

1. Open Regedit

open regedit

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

2. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup.

navigate to mosetup

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

3. Create a DWORD (32-bit) Value called AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU if it doesn't already exist.

4. Set AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU to 1.

set to 1

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

5. Close regedit and restart your PC. You should now be able to upgrade to Windows 11 from within Windows 10 by using installation media (provided you created it).

More Windows 11 Tutorials:

Avram Piltch
Avram Piltch is Tom's Hardware's editor-in-chief. When he's not playing with the latest gadgets at work or putting on VR helmets at trade shows, you'll find him rooting his phone, taking apart his PC or coding plugins. With his technical knowledge and passion for testing, Avram developed many real-world benchmarks, including our laptop battery test.
  • Johnpombrio
    Eleven Forums is a great site for all things Windows 11. Us Windows 11 DEV insider program testers have found recently that a lot of the previous computer builds and workarounds that worked with Win 11 have now been getting cut off by MS. Before using any workarounds, I would wait to see if they continue to work after the official release in a few days of Windows 11 rather than having to roll back to Win10. I have yet to see any must-have features from Win11 to make me recommend a quick upgrade to win11 so it is best to wait for now to see how things pan out. Perhaps in a few months, MS will relax its present requirements or there will be something like Storage Sense that really makes the Win 11 upgrade worthwhile. For now tho, just let the upgrade go by if you are not automatically eligible for the upgrade or are unsure about making the jump. There is no rush.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    Johnpombrio said:
    I would wait to see if they continue to work after the official release in a few days of Windows 11.
    Exactly that.

    Beta/Dev builds are one thing, what happens in actual release may be something quite different.
    Reply
  • dutty handz
    TPM isn't an issue. Why the media got hooked on that requirement, I don't know. TPM 2.0 is in essentially all CPUs from 2015 onwards. The issue here is the requirement for Secure Boot being enabled (which most current custom PC builds out there aren't, and businesses) and the ridiculous arbitrary ruling on CPUs whether an 8th Gen Intel Core or 2nd gen Ryzen. Even a 1950x Threadripper isn't cutting it even though its stronger than an i9-10920X.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    dutty handz said:
    TPM isn't an issue. Why the media got hooked on that requirement, I don't know. TPM 2.0 is in essentially all CPUs from 2015 onwards. The issue here is the requirement for Secure Boot being enabled (which most current custom PC builds out there aren't, and businesses) and the ridiculous arbitrary ruling on CPUs whether an 8th Gen Intel Core or 2nd gen Ryzen. Even a 1950x Threadripper isn't cutting it even though its stronger than an i9-10920X.
    "the media" got hooked on that to promote clicks, pointing at the evul Microsoft invalidating 7 year old systems.

    The current Win 10 is viable until at least Oct 2025.
    But any system that is currently not Win 11 viable, will be quite old in age and performance, by the time Win 10 falls off any support.

    The ONLY people this impacts are those with older systems (like mine) and GHIN Syndrome (not me).
    Reply
  • NP
    Yeah, I really don't understand what are the advantages and disadvantages of TPM2.0. I don't think there has been much about that. All the articles only discuss how to make it work (click a button in bios, wow), how to go around TPM requirement (like this article), who will have problems (practically no one).

    What I am missing is an article that says who should and who shouldn't care about TPM2.0, abd why. I'm willing to bet that this article would be quite interesting but not very useful, because it would just indicate that 99% of individual end-users have no reason to ever think about TPM2.0.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    NP said:
    Yeah, I really don't understand what are the advantages and disadvantages of TPM2.0. I don't think there has been much about that. All the articles only discuss how to make it work (click a button in bios, wow), how to go around TPM requirement (like this article), who will have problems (practically no one).

    What I am missing is an article that says who should and who shouldn't care about TPM2.0, abd why. I'm willing to bet that this article would be quite interesting but not very useful, because it would just indicate that 99% of individual end-users have no reason to ever think about TPM2.0.
    Any system built and sold in the last 4 years or so is already TPM capable.
    Either hardware or firmware.

    Users need to do nothing.
    Reply
  • gdmaclew
    Is it true that you can't activate Secure Boot (the other Windows requirement) on the fly, that it must be enabled before you install Windows 10 (or Windows 11)?
    Reply
  • LolaGT
    Probably because there are literally millions and millions of systems running on ivy/sandy bridge which is one of the most popular platforms ever and those systems are more than capable of running the current hardware/software/AAA games available, but arbitrary requirements(TPM/CPU) are attempting to cut them out of the picture.
    "just go buy a new PC" is not a very well received option.


    Why the media got hooked on that requirement, I don't know. TPM 2.0 is in essentially all CPUs from 2015 onwards.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    LolaGT said:
    Probably because there are literally millions and millions of systems running on ivy/sandy bridge which is one of the most popular platforms ever and those systems are more than capable of running the current hardware/software/AAA games available, but an arbitrary requirement is attempting to cut them out of the picture.
    "just go buy a new PC" is not a very well received option.
    And those system will be almost a decade old when their current OS, Win 10, falls off support in 2025.

    "just go buy a new PC" does not mean "just go buy a new PC TODAY" .
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    First generation Ryzen processors are not Windows 11 compatible, and they are not slouches in the performance segment, and even in 2025 likely will not hold back high resolution gaming anymore than Haswell does today and it's 8 years old. Granted most people by then will have likely upgraded to at least a Ryzen 3000 series, but to force a hardware upgrade just so DRM can go on TPM identifiers vs serial numbers or some other arbitrary reason is BS.
    Reply