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Transcend Releases 32 GB DDR3 LR-DIMMs, Makes 768 GB of System RAM Possible

Transcend has released its new 32 GB Load-Reduced DIMMs which uses a buffer to reduce the load on the system's memory bus. This allows the system to increase the storage capacity and performance whilst still reducing the system's power consumption.

Standard RDIMM technology has the system's memory bus lead directly to the DRAM chips, with no buffer in between which increases the actual electrical load on the memory bus and consequently limits the memory speeds. Transcend's LRDIMM's buffer acts as a middle man between the memory controller and the DRAM memory, and thus reduces the electrical load on the system memory bus and make it possible to offer much larger storage capacities without compromising performance.

Transcends 32 GB DDR3 LRDIMMs, make it possible to have up to 768 GB of system memory on a motherboard with 24 memory slots. This is a 50 percent increase when compared to RDIMMs, and a 500 percent jump over UDIMMs, which offered 512 GB and 128 GB respectively on a motherboard with 24 memory slots.

Given the exponential growth of memory technology, perhaps it won't be too long before we see systems offering 16 Exabytes (16 x 1018 bytes or 16 million TB), the maximum theoretical limit for 64-bit systems.

The DIMMs are backed by Transcends limited lifetime warranty, with no word on pricing yet.

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Niels Broekhuijsen
Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He covers hardware news on all components and peripherals.
  • tokencode
    They will cost so much that it will likely be cheaper to add more servers than to use these DIMMs, of course if you have to scale up rather than out, such as a single SQL server, you don't have much of a choice.
    Reply
  • vmem
    that is preposterous and awesome at the same time... someone needs to make a giant ram-drive, install a full benchmark suite on it along with various OS's and benchmark them lol
    Reply
  • myromance123
    BigMack70I think it's still safe to see 16 million TB as a long ways off in the future.....My thoughts too...
    Reply
  • webdawg77
    There will most likely be an OS of 128bit flavor before we hit the 16EB limit on the hardware.
    Reply
  • ibemerson
    And Windows will still complain if you try to disable the swap file.
    Reply
  • f-14
    iknowhowtofixit" is more memory than anyone will ever need on a computer"i've heard that before, people used to say that when windows 98 was around " oh you'll never need more that 512MB of memory"
    i heard it before that even with windows 95 " oh you'll never need more than 128MB of memory, why you have that much is just ridiculous"
    guess who was hosting all the Starcraft and Total Annhilation games and other Unit based RTS's?

    ya everybody else only had quadruple the MINIMUM system requirements of 4MB for windows 95 & 16MB for windows 98.

    i can see the need for 768GB of ram right now in just photo and video editing let alone a game of ThermoNuclear War.
    Reply
  • realibrad
    its quite possible that in 20 years, computers as we know them will be so different, than an OS wont mean much of anything.

    The clouds are rolling in...
    Reply
  • mchawk
    While this is a cool tech, its nowhere new. Dell has been seeling its 12th generation of server with these modules (32 GB of RAM in a single module, LRDIMM), for over half a year now...
    Reply
  • bunz_of_steel
    I think iknowhowtofixit : was JK... but maybe not lol. 768G ram drive.... yeh right now yer cookin with oil vmem! Although I believe there is software to turn ram into Ramdrive just haven't ck'd now that I got 32Gam with OCZ Vertex 4
    Reply
  • webdawg77
    BigMack70Agreed... even if this max limit of RAM (768GB) doubles every year, it's still 20 years before 64-bit will be obsolete...
    And with the 128bit OS (if it ever gets here), the maximum would then be 256 (whichever prefix comes into being that is 4 orders of magnitude higher than Yotta) bytes.
    Reply