‘Jellyfish’ No More: Adata Reveals Spectrix D80 DDR4 Memory

Adata debuted a new set of RGB-illuminated DDR4 memory kits with hybrid liquid-cooled heatspreaders. Formerly known as Project “Jellyfish,” the new memory joins the XPG Spectrix family of products as the D80.

The company first revealed its plans for liquid-cooled DDR4 memory at CES 2018, with a prototype RAM kit sporting clear heat spreaders filled with a non-conductive liquid with a low boiling point to efficiently dissipate heat. The memory recently reemerged at PAX East sporting RGB LED lighting and an aluminum heatsink over the liquid-filled reservoir--a significant advancement in development compared to our first preview.

Although the memory appeared production ready, full specifications were scarce at the gaming-centric convention. However, Adata just revealed the Spectrix D80 RGB DDR4 memory will debut with 16GB (2 x 8GB) and 32GB (4 x 8GB) capacities and frequencies set to 2,666MHz and 3,000MHz (for a total of four new RAM kits). CAS timings and other particulars (voltage, full chipset support) were not readily available, but Adata said the XMP-ready memory has support for Intel X299 and AMD AM4 platforms. Adata also claimed its XPG Spectrix D80 memory could reach up to 5,000MHz in the press release, similar to its Spectrix D41 memory kits.

There isn't a firm arrival date for the XPG Spectrix D80 RGB DDR4 memory, but the company revealed the suggested MSRP for each of the four announced kits. The 16GB and 32GB kits of DDR4-2666 will run $200 and $400, respectively. and the higher-speed DDR4-3000 RAM is priced at $210 (16GB) and $420 (32GB).

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  • 237841209
    That's actually a pretty decent price, considering a lot of 16GB kits for DDR4 are going for well over $200. It had cost me about $240 for 32GB of DDR3 memory.
  • Giroro
    The liquid-immersed RAM is a sorta cool novelty, but I still question whether cooling like this is necessary, or even an improvement over a normal heatsink.
  • alan_rave
    They're doing something to get attention, like LEDs) It works)