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AMD's Lisa Su to Give Virtual Keynote at CES 2021 on January 12

Dr. Lisa Su
(Image credit: AMD)

Update, Dec. 2, 10:41 a.m.: AMD has confirmed the date and time. Dr. Lisa Su's CES 2021 keynote will take place on Tuesday, January 12, 2021 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET.

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Original story continues below.

Dr. Lisa Su, president and CEO of AMD, will give a keynote speech at an all-digital CES 2021, AMD and the Consumer Technology Association announced today.

Su's presentation will focus on the company's "vision for the future of research, education, work, entertainment and gaming, including a portfolio of high-performance computing and graphics solutions," which suggests we will see some CPU and GPU news.

This isn't Su's first time on the CES stage: She also made a keynote at the Las Vegas-based show in 2019. Next year, however, her keynote will be online, due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Verizon chairman and CEO Hans Vestberg is also scheduled to make a keynote speech at CES 2021, and there will likely be more. There were eight CES keynotes in 2020.

Yesterday, it was also announced that Su will receive the Robert N. Noyce Award, the highest honor given by the Semiconductor Industry Association, a trade and lobbying group for the semiconductor industry in the U.S.

  • digitalgriffin
    6700 launch? APU's on 5000 series?

    They better concentrate on their existing product line supplies before they announce new products.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Zen3 is important, so They make more of those. New apu 5000 series is important, so They will start making those. Small Navi is semi important so They will start making those small amounth. Big Navi is not important, so They make more of those when there is room and time for them... Console chips Are important so They continue to make those as long as needed... older apus Are slowly phases out (maybe).
    My crystall ball tells something like that.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    They may be announcing their more value-oriented Ryzen 5000 processors then, like a 5600 (non-X) at a more competitive price point. With prior generations, they launched them all at about the same time, but then not many would pick up the higher-clocked parts, since the performance differences were typically quite minor, especially after an overclock, which made it difficult to justify paying a big premium for them. This method gives early adopters more incentive to go with those models though.

    It's been rumored that the 5600 may be priced around $220, though it could potentially see different pricing. I would expect it to be at least under $250 though. And there will probably be a more value-oriented 8-core, 16-thread model as well.

    It's possible they could hold out on announcing those parts until closer to Intel's Rocket Lake launch in the spring, but a January announcement at CES seems more likely.
    Reply