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Ryzen 5 7600X Beats i9-12900K by 22% in New Single-Core Benchmarks

Zen 4
Zen 4 (Image credit: AMD)

One of AMD's upcoming hexa-core Zen 4 chips (purported Ryzen 5 7600X) has just outperformed Intel's current flagship Core i9-12900K in single-core performance in a new benchmark. Nonetheless, we should treat the leaked benchmark with caution because it's UserBenchmark, and secondly, because the AMD chip is an engineering sample.

The unreleased AMD processor (via Tum_Apisak (opens in new tab)) surfaced with the 100-000000593-20_Y identifier. According to the benchmark report (opens in new tab), it has six cores and 12 threads, so it should be the Ryzen 5 7600X, assuming that AMD retains the exact core count for its Zen 4-powered Ryzen 5 SKUs. Although it's an engineering sample, the Ryzen 5 7600X chip showed impressive clock speeds. The hexa-core part reportedly ran with a 4.4 GHz base clock and 4.95 GHz boost clock. It's plausible that the processor still has some gas in the tank as AMD has boasted that the upcoming Ryzen 7000 processors will arrive with boost clocks over 5 GHz.

The testbed for the Ryzen 5 7600X consisted of the ASRock N7-B65XT motherboard and 32GB (2x16GB) of G.Skill's Trident Z5 RGB DDR5-5600 (F5-5600U3636C16G 2x16GB) memory. The slow DDR5 memory could hold the Ryzen 5 7600X back a little.

The Ryzen 5 7600X delivered up to 22% higher single-core performance than the Core i9-12900K. Compared with the Core i5-12600K, the unannounced Ryzen 5 7600X outpaced the Intel chip by 27%. Furthermore, if we look at a generation-over-generation comparison, the Ryzen 5 7600X posted 56% higher single-core performance than the Ryzen 5 5600X.

AMD Ryzen 5 7600X Benchmarks

ProcessorSingle-CoreMulti-Core
Ryzen 5 7600X2431,478
Core i9-12900K2002,946
Core i5-12600K1911,884
Ryzen 5 5600X1561,198

The Ryzen 5 7600X was a stud in single-core performance; however, it likely won't keep up with the Core i9-12900K because of the core count disparity. For reference, the Core i9-12900K is a 16-core Alder Lake processor with eight Performance (P) cores and eight Efficient (E) cores. The Core i9-12900K decimated the Ryzen 5 7600X by 99% in the multi-core department, which wasn't surprising.

The early Ryzen 5 7600X sample looks a bit lacking in multi-core performance. According to UserBenchmark, the Core i5-12600K produced 27% higher multi-core performance than the Ryzen 5 7600X. However, the Ryzen 5 7600X beat the Ryzen 5 5600X by up to 23%.

AMD will likely launch Zen 4 processors this Fall 2022. On the other end, Intel may launch its 13th Generation Raptor Lake chips around that time. It's an exciting time for processors since we'll have two new architectures that'll disrupt the market before the end of the year.

Zhiye Liu
Zhiye Liu

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • spongiemaster
    This has already been reported on other sites and the consensus seems to be that the single core result is either wrong or it's utilizing AVX-512 which is throwing the result off.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    And in UserBenchmark nonetheless, LOL.

    That site is such a joke that I can't even take this bit of "good news" seriously. That whole thing is a meme-site.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    UserBenchmark...Can TomsHardware have a ban on any article mentioning that useless, meaningless site?
    Reply
  • SkyBill40
    User Benchmark. The meme site of benchmarking with a HUGE bias toward Intel. Hilarious.

    Regardless, if this is to be truthful... it's a pretty significant win in terms of gain over the old process/design. Makes me wonder just how far the top dogs of the stack will be in front of their blue team competition? I suppose we'll see soon enough.
    Reply
  • user7007
    AMD says zen 4 ha 8-10% more IPC. I think this result is either an outlier that only happens in this particular test and isn't true for most workloads or fake.
    Reply
  • Bikki
    Ryzen 5 5600x Multi-Core land at 1198, which is 7.68 times greater than Single-Core (156), while the chip only have 6 cores. One explanation for greater than linear scaling is they measure the threads not the cores - Single thread vs Multi thread. Just a confusing benchmark I suppose.
    Reply
  • escksu
    I am not sure how accurate are the results. However, it's entirely possible to estimate 7600x results to very high accuracy.

    Zen4 is expected to have around 5-10% IPC boost over zen3.. so at the same clockspeed 7600x should be around 170. And then 5ghz boost clock. 5600x boost clock is 4.6ghz. If 7600x is 5ghz, that's 10% more. So it will be around 187.. if 5.5ghz, that's 20%, around 205.

    So, for that single core result. 7600 has to be running at close to 6ghz which is obviously impossible.
    Reply
  • The Historical Fidelity
    escksu said:
    I am not sure how accurate are the results. However, it's entirely possible to estimate 7600x results to very high accuracy.

    Zen4 is expected to have around 5-10% IPC boost over zen3.. so at the same clockspeed 7600x should be around 170. And then 5ghz boost clock. 5600x boost clock is 4.6ghz. If 7600x is 5ghz, that's 10% more. So it will be around 187.. if 5.5ghz, that's 20%, around 205.

    So, for that single core result. 7600 has to be running at close to 6ghz which is obviously impossible.

    Talking to insiders, that 8-10% IPC improvement is intentionally an understatement by AMD. They would rather over-deliver than under-deliver. Plus remember this 8-10% IPC improvement number is just an average, meaning some tasks will benefit from architectural changes more than others.
    Reply
  • peachpuff
    Raptor lake will have double the e-cores, shouldn't amd just give us 2 extra cores? Not sure if they'll be able to compete with an 8 core 7800x to a 8+16 13900 in multi threaded stuff.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    peachpuff said:
    Raptor lake will have double the e-cores, shouldn't amd just give us 2 extra cores?
    How though?! They are locked into their ccd having 8 cores, they would have to use two ccd for the 5900x and three for the 5950x which would increase the price by a lot and would introduce the same lag between the ccd we know from the 5950x.
    It's too late for a redesign, which would also be very expensive.
    Reply