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Broadwell Won’t be Available to Consumers Until 2H 2014

As an expected follow-up to a story we posted earlier this week, Intel CEO, Brian Krzanich has announced that while Broadwell chips will begin production in Q1 of 2014, they won't be available until a bit later next year. As we mentioned in our previous story, the delay has been caused by a "defect density issue," or in layman's terms, too many defective chips per circuit print.

Intel is confident that it has remedied the problem, and that its follow-ups to the Haswell line will be available in a year's time. Even so, the shift in production deadlines leaves a lot of unanswered questions, not the least of which is whether or not these CPU generations are going to start getting longer and longer.

Before too much longer, Intel and AMD and pretty much everyone else in the fab business is going to hit one barrier they can’t break – the laws of physics. As these chips get smaller and smaller, those manufacturing challenges increase, and while those chips mean tons of improvements for the consumer including lower cost, more efficiency, and better performance, after 3 nanometers quantum tunneling becomes a huge problem, and we won't be able to get any smaller.

After the 14 nm process that the current chips use, we'll have the 10 nm, the 7 nm and then finally the 5 nm.

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  • JOSHSKORN
    I'm waiting on Haswell-E series, hope this isn't affected.
    Reply
  • ingtar33
    not a surprise. Intel has been running into the physics issues involved in sub 22nm engineering for a while. it's what's holding up AMD and Nvidia from going to 20nm... the engineering problems at that size are quite large. the physics stops working right as you approach atomic sizes, bringing up whole new issues.
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    (tons of improvements for the consumer including lower cost) 2% 5% improvements and premium price... No intel i will be with my 3770k for a long long long time...
    Reply
  • Innocent_Bystander-1312890
    "No intel i will be with my 3770k for a long long long time... "

    I'm sure Intel is glad to count you among its happy customers :)
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    11793645 said:
    I'm waiting on Haswell-E series, hope this isn't affected.
    Haswell-E would be on the same 22nm as all the Ivy Bridge and other Haswell designs so there is no reason for those to be affected by the 14nm hiccups.
    Reply
  • Draven35
    11793648 said:
    not a surprise. Intel has been running into the physics issues involved in sub 22nm engineering for a while. it's what's holding up AMD and Nvidia from going to 20nm... the engineering problems at that size are quite large. the physics stops working right as you approach atomic sizes, bringing up whole new issues.

    I hope we all appreciate the irony of big problems working at tiny sizes :D
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    The i7-2600k is still going strong at 4.6ghz, 24/7. I need ddr4 at over 3000mhz and a reason to use it before I cheat on her.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    11793921 said:
    I hope we all appreciate the irony of big problems working at tiny sizes :D
    If you like huge machines working with tiny stuff, you must love the LHC!

    The irony of "big.LITTLE" does not get much better than that... at least not within the scope of what science can be carried out directly on this planet.
    Reply
  • Draven35
    11793967 said:
    If you like huge machines working with tiny stuff, you must love the LHC!

    The irony of "big.LITTLE" does not get much better than that... at least not within the scope of what science can be carried out directly on this planet.

    Sure, I got an interesting story about the use of GPU processing at the LHC from a CERN guy I met at GTC 2013.

    Reply
  • Wamphryi
    11793656 said:
    (tons of improvements for the consumer including lower cost) 2% 5% improvements and premium price... No intel i will be with my 3770k for a long long long time...

    Or right up until your Motherboard dies and you can't find a replacement which is normally the case. Right now there is a large number of Lynnfield and Core 2 CPU's gathering dust with no Motherboards to call home for example.
    Reply