Skip to main content

Corsair Unveils 128 GB DDR4 Vengeance LPX And Dominator Platinum Memory Kits

A couple of days ago, Kingston was in the headlines with claims of having built the fastest 128 GB DDR4 memory kit. Today we're talking about another first – the first unbuffered 128 GB DDR4 memory kit that you can actually buy, courtesy of Corsair. Of course, it must be noted that there are already 128 GB DDR4 memory kits available, but these are buffered and will cost more – though don't let that make you think that these kits are by any means "cheap." Corsair has three 128 GB kits, one in the Vengeance LPX lineup and two Dominator Platinum sets.

The first set, in the Vengeance LPX lineup, comes with eight 16 GB DIMMs that run at 2400 MHz with 14-16-16-31 timings. The Dominator Platinum lineup contains two sets, one with the same frequency and timings as the Vengeance LPX set, and a set that runs at 2666 MHz at 15-17-17-35 timings.

Vengeance LPX 128 GB8 x 16 GB modules2400 MHz14-16-16-31, 1.2 V$1754.99
Dominator Platinum 128 GB8 x 16 GB modules2400 MHz14-16-16-31, 1.2 V$1979.99
Dominator Platinum 128 GB8 x 16 GB modules2666 MHz15-17-17-35, 1.2 V$2119.99

All of the sets run at 1.2 V and have support for Intel XMP profiles, meaning that it's pleasantly easy to get the modules to run at the specified frequencies and timings.

If you're looking for the most "affordable" 128 GB kit, the Vengeance LPX is your best bet, costing a hefty $1,754.99. The Dominator Platinum kits will go for $1,979.99, and $2,119.99 gets you the speediest set. Of course, you'll have to seriously ask yourself whether you need this much memory, because these 16 GB DIMMs come at a hefty price-per-gigabyte premium over the much more common 8 GB DIMM kits.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • ahnilated
    Just remember, if you have to ask what you would need this amount of memory for, you don't need it.
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    Just remember, if you have to ask what you would need this amount of memory for, you don't need it.
    chrome tabs, duh.
    Reply
  • Shneiky
    So now I can use a single 16K texture project instead of splitting my objects into 4 UV spaces to fit 8K projects. I want this! Too bad it costs twice my current home PC and costs almost half of my workstation at work.
    Reply
  • Spencer Castillo
    Just remember, if you have to ask what you would need this amount of memory for, you don't need it.
    try rendering.
    Reply
  • Arabian Knight
    and what about the fact that the Xeons does not support that speed and cant be overclocked ?

    Any one?
    Reply
  • Shneiky
    This is clearly a kit for home workstations based on 2011-3 I7s or for those who can shell out for a E5 v3 series and place it in a X99 motherboard. The E5s when placed in X99 do not allow you to use XMP (it is not that they don't allow you, it just that they don't like it and usually don't post). But what you can still do is lower the memory MHz providing a still nice performance since you lower the latency as well.

    This kit is not for "anybody" so criticizing it is useless. Its for a niche market. And I can clearly see myself picking up one of this kits and slamming it next to a 5960 if I had the money.

    I occasionally fill the 32 Gbs of RAM at work. Some Maya scenes even take up 100% RAM and up to 75% of the page file (for 32 + 24 = 56 GBs in total) during render times. But that is what you get when you have 11 shaders with diffuse, spec, glossy and normal map each being 8K for a total of 44 8K textures - each is around 200-240 MBs in TGA 24 bit format.

    As for a home workstation - I am much more inclined to pay 1700 for 128 GBs of RAM and a 1000 for an I7 than to shell out 3000+ for ECC workstation RAM + 2000 something for a Xeon.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Wow!! I knew it was gona cost a ton, but not that much lol. Why would somebody need that much RAM?
    Reply
  • PEJUman
    and what about the fact that the Xeons does not support that speed and cant be overclocked ?

    Any one?
    and what about the fact that the Xeons does not support that speed and cant be overclocked ?

    Any one?
    and what about the fact that the Xeons does not support that speed and cant be overclocked ?

    Any one?
    This is clearly a kit for home workstations based on 2011-3 I7s or for those who can shell out for a E5 v3 series and place it in a X99 motherboard. The E5s when placed in X99 do not allow you to use XMP (it is not that they don't allow you, it just that they don't like it and usually don't post). But what you can still do is lower the memory MHz providing a still nice performance since you lower the latency as well.

    This kit is not for "anybody" so criticizing it is useless. Its for a niche market. And I can clearly see myself picking up one of this kits and slamming it next to a 5960 if I had the money.

    I occasionally fill the 32 Gbs of RAM at work. Some Maya scenes even take up 100% RAM and up to 75% of the page file (for 32 + 24 = 56 GBs in total) during render times. But that is what you get when you have 11 shaders with diffuse, spec, glossy and normal map each being 8K for a total of 44 8K textures - each is around 200-240 MBs in TGA 24 bit format.

    As for a home workstation - I am much more inclined to pay 1700 for 128 GBs of RAM and a 1000 for an I7 than to shell out 3000+ for ECC workstation RAM + 2000 something for a Xeon.

    Xeon E5 16xx - V3 can be overclocked on X99 platform. I know because I own one.
    obviously the xeons are lucrative because of the ECC support, which precludes these speeds. But for stability, 64GB ECC + 16xx -V3 xeons (workstation xeons) are price competitive with the 5960X. both proc. are about the same price, you trade off higher memory speed for ECC memory, again at roughly the same price/GB.

    The Quad DDR4 and the massive L3 on these E-Haswell seems to provide enough bandwidth without OCing the memory, even when the octal cores with HT are overclocked. I prefer memory size + ECC than sheer speed.
    Reply
  • alidan
    well... what could you need this for.
    some said a maya scene, but at that point if i was doing hobby work i would instead of making everything 8k, i would figure out what the lowest res texture i could get away with is (and by that i mean and not see pixels) doing that would likely save a crap ton of space and may not even necessitate the use of a 64gb kit.

    for gaming, well i would make a ram disc, copy the game folder over to it, change a letter in the original folder and symbolically link it and literally get the fastest loading you can possibly get, while having between 67 and 24 gb for system ram (gtav is 61gb and star citizen is aiming to be 100gb)

    i have always wanted a 25-50gb ramdisk but i would always be sacrificing a ton of system ram... 16gb sticks make those stupidly big ram discs a possibility, and by the time i get a ddr4 based system, they may not be stupidly overpriced either.
    Reply
  • M0j0jojo
    Hmm...this is a hard choice to make, now should i buy a whole new PC or even a car for that matter or just these rams?
    Reply