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EVGA Introduces Upgradable All-In-One Liquid Cooling System

Normally, if you want to cool a CPU and a GPU in a single water cooling loop, you need a custom loop. Recently, EKWB launched its expandable all-in-one liquid coolers, but it seems that the Slovenian manufacturer isn’t the only one to do so. At CES, EVGA showed off a new liquid cooling system – one that’s also expandable. For now, it’s called the EVGA QRC/QRG system, with the two abbreviations standing for Quick Release CPU and Quick Release GPU, respectively.

The parts are built with Asetek pumps, which are basically the same parts as we see in almost all the standard all-in-one coolers. The difference here is that each module has two quick-disconnect fittings. The CPU block has its own pump, as do the GPU blocks, so there will be no running into hydraulic restriction issues due to a single weak pump being bogged down. In fact, in longer loops, if one of the pumps fails, you may not even notice right away because the other pumps remain unaffected.

In this system, on the graphics cards, only the GPUs are cooled by the water loop. The memory and VRM circuitry are still air-cooled by the fan on the graphics card, exactly like how various graphics with pre-installed water cooling work.

Because of how EVGA has placed the quick-disconnect fittings, it is actually possible to use up to four graphics cards in a single loop. To cool these effectively though, you’ll also have to add a second, or maybe third radiator, but EVGA plans to make those too.

All the hardware will come pre-filled, so it will really just be plug-and-play.

Compared to EKWB’s Predator lineup, this setup offers a couple advantages. For one, it actually allows you to use multiple GPUs, and it will likely be a tad cheaper. In contrast, EKWB’s set actually uses the same hardware as in custom loops, so you can always take it apart and turn it into a true custom loop, which you won’t be able to do with EVGA's offering, because these parts do not use G1/4" threading.

EVGA also said that there will be software monitoring capabilities.

Sadly, EVGA did not reveal anything about pricing or about availability just yet.

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  • neieus
    Ding! My attention has been obtained!
    Reply
  • toddybody
    I've been a long time EVGA fanboy (6 cards+)...but that system just looks sloppy as heck.

    Stick with the simplicity of aircooling for GPUs, or go with a true EKWB for a custom loop. The "hybrid" coolers always looked cheap to me.
    Reply
  • gilbadon
    I've been a long time EVGA fanboy (6 cards+)...but that system just looks sloppy as heck.

    Stick with the simplicity of aircooling for GPUs, or go with a true EKWB for a custom loop. The "hybrid" coolers always looked cheap to me.

    I personally love the asus poseidon graphics card. I think it is an awesome looking card and makes it looks like it takes the best of both air and water cooling to perform better (not sure if it actually does lol). On a side note, I fully agree this looks sloppy but it is a step in the right direction
    Reply
  • stoned_ritual
    I love that more companies have started making expandable prefilled loops. I installed the swiftech h-240x in my system at home, expanded with extra 280mm radiator and an ek full cover block for my gpu. The hottest temps my system sees now are around 45c.
    Reply
  • thundervore
    This is nothing new, Asetek had this on there site for over a year now and its still crap because it only cool the GPU chip, and leaves out the VRMs and Memory.

    http://www.asetek.com/desktop/oem-gpu-combo-coolers/550qc/

    The EKWB may cost a little more but at least the customer will have a full water block on their GPU. A fancy Logo will not change the fact that it is still the same underperforming pumps and blocks that everyone else uses from Corsair to Thermaltake
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    I am a firm believer that if you want liquid cooling do it right.
    These expandable loops are cool and all, but having the blocks like these are just irritating. The cards are not cooled fully, so you really gain nothing over air, and the tubing on this unit just seems, off. The return line on the CPU is way too long.

    Start with something like the H240x and proceed (you know, actual water cooling components), or go full out.
    Reply
  • gilbadon
    Bunch of old curmudgeons on here. Regardless of functionality it is "cool" to have a water cooling setup even if it is AIO. Even if the pump and fans are louder than your average air cooler there is a good looking and awesome notoriety with the fact that a PC is water cooled.

    My first water cooling setup was an AIO and now I am building full custom loops. It will improve the water cooling industry as a whole and I fully support the creation of all things water cooling.
    Reply
  • killerchickens
    Will it fit in my hadron hydro?
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    17283432 said:
    Bunch of old curmudgeons on here. Regardless of functionality it is "cool" to have a water cooling setup even if it is AIO. Even if the pump and fans are louder than your average air cooler there is a good looking and awesome notoriety with the fact that a PC is water cooled.

    My first water cooling setup was an AIO and now I am building full custom loops. It will improve the water cooling industry as a whole and I fully support the creation of all things water cooling.

    Dont get me wrong, Im using an H100i and enjoy the way it looks and all the oos and ahhs when I explain its full of water to the people in my dorm.
    I wish I had gone with a swiftech cooler just so I could add to it in a more cost effective way than having to replace the whole unit. (plus the clear tubing looks so much better.
    Reply
  • Mac266
    *Waits for Asetek to call foul and let slip the dogs of patents.
    Reply