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Hinged, Dual-Screen Display Coming Soon with Touch Option

Geminos hinged dual-screen display
(Image credit: Mobile Pixels Inc)

Mobile Pixels Inc is a company which likes to provide customers with multiple screen options. It has previously produced a wide range (opens in new tab) of extended and additional screen products for laptop users, adding an extra screen, or two, or even more - to help boost mobile worker productivity. 

Now it has focused in on innovating for the desktop, with the Geminos display family; the Geminos and Geminos X. These are large clamshell folding displays secured on an adjustable pedestal stand with built-in hub. The product designers assert that using a Geminos can “save your neck and your desk space,” and its adjustments and articulation are great for all sorts of productivity tasks.

Geminos hinged dual-screen display

(Image credit: Mobile Pixels Inc)

The Geminos stacked screen Kickstarter project has been a runaway success on the crowdfunding platform, becoming fully funded in just 36 minutes. This weekend Geminos developers announced stretch goals for the crowdfunder, perhaps hoping to give it another boost. The project started with a $25,000 goal, and currently has >$1.6 million in backing, at about half way through the campaign. If the project reaches $1.75 million (it will, with 18 days to go) buyers will get a 10-point-touch screen option ($50 extra) on the QHD-screen equipped Geminos-X model.

The potential appeal of the Geminos monitors is easy to understand - but what of the specs? We have more important details for you, to flesh out the basics, and one of the first things to consider is that there are two Geminos models. Though they have a lot in common, there is one big difference between the Geminos and Geminos X; the former has twin 24-inch FHD displays, and the latter employs QHD displays. As a display-product, it is important we look at the screen specs closely, not just the folding ‘gimmick’, so we have tabulated the key monitor specs below.

Geminos

Geminos X

Screens

2x 24-inch

2x 24-inch

Screen tech

IPS, LED backlight

IPS, LED backlight

Display resolution

1080p for 97ppi

1440p for 123ppi

Brightness

250 nits

300 nits

Contrast

1000:1

1000:1

Color

6 bit, 97% sRGB

6 bit, 99% sRGB

Refresh rate

60 Hz

75 Hz

Response time

14 ms

14ms

Other features

1080p webcam, speakers, and a USB-C 100W PD dock with HDMI, USB, SD/CF card, Ethernet, audio and more

1080p webcam, speakers, and a USB-C 100W PD dock with HDMI, USB, SD/CF card, Ethernet, audio and more

Physical

20 lbs, 4-inch thick, pedestal adjustment stand

20 lbs, 4-inch thick, pedestal adjustment stand

Geminos hinged dual-screen display

(Image credit: Mobile Pixels Inc)

Above you can see the QHD model is a little better than the FHD model in several not-directly-accountable-to-the-resolution ways; the max brightness, color gamut, and max refresh rate. Also it must be commented upon the 13ms claimed response time means that this clamshell monitor design won’t be turning heads of any fast-paced gaming aficionados. Another difference between the FHD and QHD models will come about when the stretch goal mentioned in the intro comes into effect. If you want 10-point-touch functionality on the lower panel, you will have to choose the QHD model (Geminos X), as well as add $50 to your order.

On the topic of pricing, at the time of writing the Geminos is still listed for early birds at $499, while the Geminos X is $649. These are both claimed to be half the future retail prices.

Please remember that participating and pledging your cash in a crowdfunder isn’t the same as buying a product from a web store. Sometimes projects go wrong, and some people lose their cash. Weighed against that fact is that early adopters get these innovative products first, and sometimes get good discounts on general public launch MSRPs.

If you like the idea of having twin monitors one above the other, but the flexing and seam doesn’t appeal, please take a look at our recent review of the LG DualUp 28MQ780 Monitor, which is equal to two 21-inch QHD monitors stacked on top of each another.

Mark Tyson
Freelance News Writer

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • Delectovan
    This monitor still has terrible ergonomics. Look at any ergo guide and you can see how poor monitor height will lead to repetitive strain injury. One of the two monitors in this will always be at the wrong height.
    Reply
  • KultiVator
    Interesting form-factor but, wow… that’s one heck of a lot of wonga for 6-bit panels and fairly dim backlighting.
    Reply
  • samopa
    If you play your favorite game in this type of monitor for two hours or more, there's a good chance that you get (literally) pain in the neck.
    Reply
  • husker
    You know, you can just set up a second monitor using something like an Ergotron Monitor Arm and then use any 2 monitors you want. They don't even have to be the same size and you can can replace one whenever you want.
    Reply