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Intel Arc A370M Mobile GPU Comes Close To a GTX 1650 Super

Intel Arc
Intel Arc (Image credit: Intel)

Another one of Intel's upcoming Arc Alchemist gaming graphics cards has surfaced in the wild. Unlike the Arc A380 that recently broke cover, the Arc A370M is a graphics card that targets mobile devices.

Intel aims to be the third player in the graphics game, taking on seasoned veterans like AMD and Nvidia. It's uncertain if Intel has an SKU to compete against the best graphics cards, such as the Radeon RX 6900 XT or GeForce RTX 3090. However, Arc Alchemist will offer gamers a third option when shopping for a graphics card, which comes as music to consumers' ears in times of an existing graphics card shortage.

The Arc A370M reportedly has 128 execution units (EUs). SiSoftware reported 160 EUs, but the software erroneously combined the UHD 770 iGPU's 32 EUs with the Arc A370M's 128 EUs. In addition, the benchmark submission revealed a 1.55 GHz clock speed, but it's unclear if it was the clock speed for the Arc A370M or the iGPU from the unknown Alder Lake chip from the test platform. The Arc A370M's other specifications included 4GB of GDDR6 memory across a humble 128-bit memory interface.

Intel Arc A370M (Image credit: SiSoftware)

As with any unreleased hardware, we recommend approaching the performance numbers with caution. Engineering samples rarely maintain their specifications, and there is always room for driver and software optimizations.

The Arc A370M (via Tum_Apisak) scored 2,399.97 Mpix/s in SiSoftware's GP (GPU) Processing test. For comparison, Arc A380 scored 2,956.10 Mpix/s in the same benchmark. Therefore, the Arc A380 was 23% faster than the Arc A370M, which shouldn't come as a surprise since the former is a desktop graphics card, and the latter is a mobile graphics card.

The GeForce GTX 1650 Super had an aggregated score of 2,568.82 Mpix/s, meaning the desktop Turing-powered graphics card only delivered 7% higher performance than the Arc A370M. The AMD equivalent would be the Radeon RX 570, which is 6% (2,546.56 Mpix/s) faster.

Intel had stated initially on its website that Arc Alchemist would arrive in the first quarter of this year. However, the chipmaker later amended the information to "coming 2022." In addition, Raja M. Koduri, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Intel's Accelerated Computing Systems and Graphics Group, recently tweeted that Intel was working on getting "millions of Arc GPUs into the hands of PC gamers every year." Of course, we don't expect Intel to end the graphics card shortage, but it never hurts to have more competition in the market.

Zhiye Liu
Zhiye Liu

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • cknobman
    More important than the performance will be the drivers.
    Intel graphics drivers have always been crap and they still are right now.
    I wouldnt touch their graphics cards until I knew their drivers were good.
    Reply
  • artk2219
    cknobman said:
    More important than the performance will be the drivers.
    Intel graphics drivers have always been crap and they still are right now.
    I wouldnt touch their graphics cards until I knew their drivers were good.

    Chicken and egg problem unfortunately, they need users to test and help with their drivers, but users aren't as likely to use it if the drivers aren't very good, well unless its ok-ish and the price is right. We'll see how this goes hah.
    Reply
  • cyrusfox
    cknobman said:
    More important than the performance will be the drivers.
    Their drivers are top notch when it comes to integration with video and productivity applications (Adobe, handbrake, etc...)
    For the games I play (OLD) Not really concerned or a driver at all. As if Nvidia and AMD don't need to release monthly new drivers to address issues, Nvidia is top notch and it will take years for Intel to catch up but in this market I really don't see that being a deterrent.

    Personally I can't wait to replace my GT1030 with a DG2 card, assuming the price is reasonable these are all going to sell out in this market.

    Look at the competition, I would consider the 3050 but much more than I want to spend(I am one of those lucky people who bought a GTX1080 with Waterblock use for $300 late 2018 when 2080 released) I can't imagine spending that same money for the equivalent of a 1060. With the possibility of DG2 and using deep link with the 12900k it will be paired with, excited to see how they can utilize this for productivity applications. In contrast the RX6500XT is going to age very poorly especially with no encode decode support.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    artk2219 said:
    Chicken and egg problem unfortunately, they need users to test and help with their drivers, but users aren't as likely to use it if the drivers aren't very good, well unless its ok-ish and the price is right. We'll see how this goes hah.
    Since Intel uses the same general architecture for the 11th-gen IGP on desktops and 10th-gen on laptops which are used in millions of non-gaming PCs and laptops around the world, the core functionality should be decent by now.
    Reply