57 New Intel CPUs, Mobile Core i9 Break Cover In AIDA64 Beta

Intel appears to be readying new sets of mobile and desktop processors, with Finalwire adding a plethora of new CPUs to a recent beta version of its popular AID64 benchmarking suite, including what appears to be the first mobile i9 processor.

The release notes of AID64 Extreme beta version 5.92.4397 are highlighted by several new entries for the program’s Intel Processor Number detection feature. All of the new CPUs are listed as 8th and 9th generation parts (8000 and 9000-series), ranging from Celeron and Core i3 to Core i7 and a new Core i9. The applicable release notes are listed below:

“Identification of Intel Core i7-8000H Series (aka Coffee Lake-H MB)
Identification of Intel Core i9-8000H Series (aka Coffee Lake-H MB)
Identification of Intel Xeon E-21xx(G) (aka Coffee Lake-S WS)
Identification of Intel Xeon E-21xxM (aka Coffee Lake-H WS)
Intel Processor Number detection for Celeron G4900, G4900T, G4920, G4930, G4930T, G4950
Intel Processor Number detection for Core i3-8000, 8000T, 8020, 8020T, 8100T, 8120, 8120T, 8300T, 8320, 8320T, 9000, 9000T, 9100, 9100T, 9300, 9300T
Intel Processor Number detection for Core i5-8300H, 8400B, 8400H, 8400T, 8420, 8420T, 8500, 8500B, 8500T, 8550, 8650, 8650K, 9400, 9400T, 9500, 9600, 9600K
Intel Processor Number detection for Core i7-8670, 8670T, 8700B, 8700T, 8750H, 8850H
Intel Processor Number detection for Core i9-8950HK
Intel Processor Number detection for Pentium Gold G5400, G5400T, G5420, G5420T, G5500, G5500T, G5600, G5600T, G5620
Intel Processor Number detection for Xeon E-2176M, 2186M”

In total, the AIDA64 beta release adds support for 57 new Intel processors. Although Coffee Lake mobile processors have been in the works for some time, this is the first solid source to disclose the specific models we’ll be seeing when the chips debut. New desktop processors are also inbound, with Intel releasing a mix of Core i3, i5, and i7 desktop models that appear to target lower power ceilings, clockrates, and pricing than its current line of CPUs, judging by the model numbers and suffixes.

The presence of 9000-series CPUs may also indicate that Intel is releasing a new processor generation, but whether or not these models are Coffee Lake refreshes (similar to the recent slew of Kaby Lake refresh CPUs) or 10nm Cannon Lake chips is anyone's guess at this point. The timing seems somewhat premature for the anticipated architectural die shrink, but with CES just around the corner and CPU competition higher than it's been in decades, anything is possible.

Most notably, it seems the mobile segment is about to receive its first Core i9 CPU, the -8950HK. We can only speculate what this new CPU will bring to the table in terms of core count and clock speeds, but it seems to indicate that Intel plans to offer six-core (or possibly eight-core) mobile processors for the high-end mobile market.

This thread is closed for comments
4 comments
    Your comment
  • lperreault21
    "Most notably, it seems the mobile segment is about to receive its first Core i9 CPU, the -8950HK. We can only speculate what this new CPU will bring to the table in terms of core count and clock speeds, but it seems to indicate that Intel plans to offer six-core (or possibly eight-core) mobile processors for the high-end mobile market."


    Eh, Probably a 2c/4t cpu

    /s

    I would be surprising if it is a 6 core or a 8 core, Probably though a 4c/8t CPU with a 300 MHz Boost, Knowing it is intel
  • plissandro
    @LPERREAULT21 you seem to not know that the new i5-U and i7-U are already quad cores with multithread. The HK variants will be most likely hexa cores, so the i9-8950HK will probably have six or eight cores
  • MichaelElfial
    Man, I just saw the other day I5 branded CPU with 4c/8t with U suffix on a non-gaming laptop. I'd say - it is guaranteed that we will see 6 core mobiles, the question is how far further will Intel go in terms of cores, frequency, periphery support etc. After seeing ASUS put 8 core desktop Rysen in a laptop, this i9 doesn't surprise me at all Intels can match at gaming (and most usages, but not all) AMD with 6 cores against 8, but will it be enough to "match" them with possibly better power/productivity coefficient or they will go for a kill? It is not just cores and single core performance, it is much more complicated story, but in popular usage scenarious this measure caught people's eye and will drive the market success of this CPU generation (laptops are not something you upgrade back and forth until happy - what you decide before buying stays with you for all the good and bad, so the cores will determine a lot on this marked during the next year).