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Specifications of Intel's Mobile Haswell CPUs Leaked

VR-Zone published the specs about three processor SKUs, including the i7-4800MQ (2.7 GHz) and the i7-4900MQ (2.8 GHz) that target the higher end of the mainstream and multimedia market, as well as the flagship i7-4930MX (3.0 GHz) for the gaming and workstation market. All Haswell processors will be immediately positioned above Ivy Bridge.

The data sheet reveals that Intel will lift the TDP of Haswell compared to Ivy Bridge. The unlocked gaming CPU will now be rated at 57 watts TDP, up from 55 watts in the current i7-3940/3920 XM models. The mainstream processors will be lifted from 45 watts to 47 watts. As small as the increase may seem, an increase of the TDP is a significant for Intel and indicates that Intel targets noticeable performance improvements in these two segments. Rumor has it that the extra power, as well as power savings over Ivy Bridge are consumed by the graphics engine.

The CPUs will integrate Intel's new HD4600 GPU, which will run at a base clock of 400 MHz, down from 650 MHz in the current HD4000 generation. The 4600 will scale to 1300 MHz in the mainstream and up to 1350 MHz in the flagship processor.

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  • yialanliu
    It worries me that the TDP is being raised even though it's supposed to be more efficient. I feel like it's a step backwards rather than forward especially as they try to converge onto ARM's power efficiency and the long term goal is to become super low TDP, not stay the same TDP.
    Reply
  • Shin-san
    The HD4600 might be as fast as current consoles
    Reply
  • victorintelr
    sucks that besides the 49xx and 48xx series the rest will have HD4000 graphics. should been the other way. In the end the computer with the most expensive processors will probably have dedicated graphics. Not that the graphic chips from Intel are the best in class but the get better little by little. Won't jugde more until I see actual benchmarks.
    Reply
  • victorintelr
    damn it, my bad. didn't read everything. All haswell processors have HD4600. still between discrete and integrated there is a difference.
    Reply
  • bystander
    yialanliuIt worries me that the TDP is being raised even though it's supposed to be more efficient. I feel like it's a step backwards rather than forward especially as they try to converge onto ARM's power efficiency and the long term goal is to become super low TDP, not stay the same TDP.I believe they are trying to get power efficiency down to ARM levels, only on their Atom line. The Atom is what is competing with ARM, for now.
    Reply
  • jonjonjon
    i though i read somewhere that certain mobile haswell chips will have a tdp under 10.
    Reply
  • sa1nt
    tom's pictures just 3 clicks away...
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    jonjonjoni though i read somewhere that certain mobile haswell chips will have a tdp under 10.The leaked specs are about the performance (QM) and extreme (XM, the mobile equivalent of desktop K-chips - complete with unlocked multipliers) Haswell mobile i7.

    ULV variants of Haswell i3/5/7 are those that will be in the 7-20W range.
    Reply
  • jkflipflop98
    sa1nttom's pictures just 3 clicks away...
    Yeah really. . . what kind of inbred software engineer is employed to create this site? No edit on the comments, you have to click 3 times just to see a full-sized picture, and let's not forget that wonderful mountain of ads with viruii embedded in them along both sides of the page.

    Reply
  • dgingeri
    While Intel is increasing the performance of their integrated graphics (it's hard to go anywhere but up when you're at the bottom) I still wouldn't use it. Their support for their graphics drivers SUCKS.

    Their drivers in general have always been a problem. Their first gen 10Gb chip, the 82598, had issues with Linux. Did they fix it? No. They told everyone else how to fix it themselves. (It was just a matter of increasing the software buffers.) Some versions of Linux added an adjustment if it found that card, but Intel still, after more than three years, refuses to just write that into the Linux driver and correct the problem. There have been problems with their older 100Mb NICs, but they don't correct those, and now there's a major problem with their new X540 server 10Gb card, and I haven't seen a fix for that in over a month.

    There's still a bunch of problems with all the older generations of integrated graphics. They just flat out said they wouldn't support the 900 series graphics in Vista and the Areo interface, causing a lot of people to get mad and a bunch of laptop makers to get sued. My current work machine uses the G45 chipset, and I have a ton of problems with it: Chrome and IE freezing, Outlook 2010 display problems, the laptop screen won't come back up after being in hibernation and hooking to a dock with a monitor. Intel just won't update the drivers to correct them.

    I don't like companies who won't support their drivers properly. Increasing performance isn't as important as supporting the drivers and making them work.
    Reply