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Intel Launches 32nm Westmere-based Xeon CPUs

Intel today launched what it calls its "most secure data center processor" in the new Xeon 5600 series, which is a 32nm update over the previous Xeon 5500's 45nm process. As many of you can figure out, the new Xeon 5600 series is based on the new Intel Westmere core technology.

What sets the Xeon 5600 apart from the consumer-level Core i3, i5 and i7 chips are two new security features -- Intel AES-NI, and Intel TXT -- that enable faster encryption and decryption performance for more secure transactions and virtualized environments.

The frequency-optimized quad-core version of the Intel Xeon processor 5600 series peaks at 3.46 GHz with a TDP of 130 watts, while the six-core version reaches 3.33 GHz with a TDP of 130 watts. Advanced six-core versions will top out at 2.93 GHz and TDP of 95 watts, and the standard quad-core processor will reach 2.66 GHz at 80 watts. Low voltage versions of the chip will have TDPs as low as 60 watts and 40 watts and feature six and four cores respectively.

Intel also announced the availability of the Xeon processor L3406 series. Targeted for use in the single processor micro server segment, the Intel Xeon processor L3406 series has a TDP of only 30 watts, making it ideal for high-density form factors and power-sensitive environments.

Check out more details in Intel's easy-to-understand introduction video below.

  • cadder
    32.5 watts/core and 32nm, does that sound dangerous?
    Reply
  • agnickolov
    Now just waiting for Core i7 9xx series refresh to 32nm...
    Reply
  • Shadow703793
    Early review here: http://it.anandtech.com/IT/showdoc.aspx?i=3769

    In most cases, the Intel Xeon 5670 keeps up or beats the 3P/6 Core AMD set up. Pretty impressive. I do hope AMD can pull off Bulldozer to similar/same/better levels.
    Reply
  • DjEaZy
    ... WTF!!! Do intel think, that IT server specialists are stupid? This iz a fairytale like presentation for kids... do real life benchmarks, demos and such sort of stuff!!!
    Reply
  • I wonder if they used Larrabee to run the graphics for their "city" simulation LOL
    Reply
  • DjEaZy
    btmedic04I wonder if they used Larrabee to run the graphics for their "city" simulation LOL... it seems so...
    Reply
  • anamaniac
    This is actually... disappointing. Thought they'd get a better boost from 32nm.
    agnickolovNow just waiting for Core i7 9xx series refresh to 32nm...Same. I thought the i7 930 would be 32nm, but it's just 2.8GHz instead of 2.66GHz on 45nm.

    So, our 45nm process has gotten better, even after it's matured for hell knows how long, but no luck on the 32nm still?
    Also, imagine a C2D on the now more mature 45nm, or the relatively fresh 32nm. Those could probably reach some sick speeds (granted, they've been replaced by the LGA 1156 dual cores).

    I know AMD processors typically undervolt very generously, how about these 32nm babies?
    Reply
  • virtualban
    DjEaZy... WTF!!! Do intel think, that IT server specialists are stupid? This iz a fairytale like presentation for kids... do real life benchmarks, demos and such sort of stuff!!!agreed, that's what I was thinking all along: where is the thing that will make me buy this? Those few words that take 30 seconds or less to read? It was fun watching the guy anyway. Not going to do that thing often though.
    Reply
  • Burodsx
    I can't wait to start seeing the 32nm quad-cores! I'm still running on a 65nm chip so it's about high time to upgrade.
    Reply
  • anamaniac
    BurodsxI can't wait to start seeing the 32nm quad-cores! I'm still running on a 65nm chip so it's about high time to upgrade.I went from a 95nm dual core to 45nm quad core. =D
    I think 65nm to 32nm is a good transition. Why bother upgrading every new fab?
    Though I may upgrade my fathers laptop which has a 2GHz 65nm T5800 for a 2.8GHz 45nm P9700, which actually has a lower TDP (I considered the upgrade because of how hto it can get).
    Reply