Microsoft Ends Metadata Support on Windows 7

Microsoft has just hammered another nail into Windows 7’s coffin. On Friday the company announced, that it would be ending support for metadata across Windows Media Center and Windows Media Player for Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 (although 8 and 8.1 will still have access to it on Media Player). This apparently comes as a result of Microsoft “looking at customer feedback and usage data”, and deciding that maintaining the service was no longer cost-efficient.

Although this is a bit of a nuisance for those with expansive media libraries, it’s worth noting that this will not have any effect on media that you already have the metadata downloaded for. However going forward, seeing information such as title, genre, artist, director, etc will be gone, unless you opt for a third-party service instead.

Fortunately, Microsoft is still continuing to support media player playback, meaning if you are still clinging on for dear life to the ad and Candy Crush free OS, you won’t be entirely out of luck just yet.

Windows Media VersionOperating SystemAffected by this change?
Windows Media Center  
 Windows 8.1Yes
 Windows 8Yes
 Windows 7Yes
Windows Media Player  
 Windows 10No
 Windows 8.1No
 Windows 8No
 Windows 7Yes

Why this feature is disabled in Windows 7, 8 and 8.1, yet still available on Windows 10 is clearly a bit of a mystery, or maybe not. Read Microsoft's official statement about it here. Or alternatively we recommend you try out a free media player alternative such as VLC player, or Media Player Classic.

13 comments
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  • jimmysmitty
    With a year left for support its not surprising. In the next year we will probably also see hardware vendors stop making drivers for Windows 7 for newer products and software will also slowly stop supporting it.

    7 had a good life. Its time for it to move on.
  • brooks2
    There are reasons why many people have not transitioned to Windows 10. Two major ones are that many people have not forgotten Windows ME and Windows Vista. They also still remember the Windows XP slow down as it bloated up from updates and the fact that Windows 8 was not exactly a big improvement over Windows 7. Windows 7 has provided stability which is certainly not I had with other versions. I've gone through MS-DOS and 8 versions of Windows, two of which (ME and Vista) were simply awful. Over the past few years, Microsoft has distributed Windows updates (both 7 and 10) which had major problems. Based on this history, it is hardly surprising that people are not switching from Windows 7 which works well to Windows 10.

    It appears to me that Microsoft is killing off the media metadata now, because it will not upset corporate IT managers who are still on Windows 7.
  • jimmysmitty
    2714554 said:
    There are reasons why many people have not transitioned to Windows 10. Two major ones are that many people have not forgotten Windows ME and Windows Vista. They also still remember the Windows XP slow down as it bloated up from updates and the fact that Windows 8 was not exactly a big improvement over Windows 7. Windows 7 has provided stability which is certainly not I had with other versions. I've gone through MS-DOS and 8 versions of Windows, two of which (ME and Vista) were simply awful. Over the past few years, Microsoft has distributed Windows updates (both 7 and 10) which had major problems. Based on this history, it is hardly surprising that people are not switching from Windows 7 which works well to Windows 10. It appears to me that Microsoft is killing off the media metadata now, because it will not upset corporate IT managers who are still on Windows 7.


    A lot of IT has moved to 10. The ones who don't are typically specialized software that has either not been written for anything newer than 7, usually because its no longer supported, or the cost would be too high.

    And Vistas biggest failing was hardware more than software. So many OEMs took XP systems with 256MB of system RAM, a single core Celeron and an old PATA HDD and pawned them off as Vista ready when at the time even XP needed 1GB minimum to run smoothly. If you built a decent gaming system at Vistas launch it ran fine. UAC was a tad aggressive (better in 7 by far) but still it was more the hardware OEMs than Vista itself.