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Sony Details Play Area, Gaming Scenarios And Age Limit For PlayStation VR (Updated)

Update, 7/29/2016, 12:46 p.m. PDT:  If you're curious to see how PSVR stacks up against the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift, you can check out our lengthy comparison between the three devices.

More details about the PlayStation VR (PSVR) are coming out as the launch date approaches. The latest information covers the range of the PlayStation Camera, age requirements and the multiple ways you can use the device.

In terms of the camera’s coverage area, the guide on PlayStation Asia mentioned that the play area is equal to the maximum height captured by the camera. As for the overall length and width of the space, the image below shows that you’ll need to have a width of about 1.9 meters (6.2 feet) and a length of about 2.4 meters (7.8 feet). Because the camera has a cone-shaped coverage area, it will detect a width of 0.7 meters (2.2 feet) at the minimum distance of 0.6 meters (1.9 feet).

Obviously, the large space is required for specific games that utilize the PlayStation Move controllers. However, some of the games don’t require the peripherals, opting instead to use the traditional DualShock 4 controller, which means that you’ll probably need to sit down in the middle of the coverage area to play the game.

Even with the device strapped to your head, you don’t have to play alone. You can access “Separate Mode” with the “Social Screen” feature, which allows your friend to play with you via the TV screen. The Social Screen also has a mirror mode so others can see your gameplay reflected on the screen.

Similar to Steam VR’s Desktop Theater Mode, PSVR has a “Cinematic Mode,” which allows you to play your regular PlayStation 4 titles. You can also use PSVR to view 360-degree videos and photos.

Just like the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive, PSVR doesn’t recommend the experience for children (Sony specifically states that the target age is 12 and up). Oculus’ reasoning for the limit was due to the device’s interpupillary distance range, which doesn’t cover most children. However, a reason for the PSVR limitation wasn’t provided.

PlayStation VR launches on October 13 with about 50 titles available at launch. If you already have the PlayStation 4 Camera and two Move controllers, it will cost you $399. The full bundle, which includes the camera, two Move controllers, the PlayStation VR demo and PlayStation VR Worlds, will cost $500.

  • Jeff Fx
    >PSVR doesn’t recommend the experience for children ...However, a reason for the PSVR limitation wasn’t provided.

    It's because we don't know what VR headsets will do to a developing brain. Some people are currently experimenting on their own young children, so we will be able to collect some data despite this being a really unethical experiment.
    Reply
  • Puiucs
    18353811 said:
    >PSVR doesn’t recommend the experience for children ...However, a reason for the PSVR limitation wasn’t provided.

    It's because we don't know what VR headsets will do to a developing brain. Some people are currently experimenting on their own young children, so we will be able to collect some data despite this being a really unethical experiment.

    don't be stupid, the hardware does nothing to your kid. at most it makes his eyes red because of playing too much.
    it just means that kids can use it, but it's up to the parents to keep them from hurting themselves. you don't want kids throwing controllers around because they saw an enemy in front of them. the physical dimensions of the headset also artificially limit the age.
    and let's not forget that the games have age restrictions.
    Reply
  • alidan
    18355042 said:
    18353811 said:
    >PSVR doesn’t recommend the experience for children ...However, a reason for the PSVR limitation wasn’t provided.

    It's because we don't know what VR headsets will do to a developing brain. Some people are currently experimenting on their own young children, so we will be able to collect some data despite this being a really unethical experiment.

    don't be stupid, the hardware does nothing to your kid. at most it makes his eyes red because of playing too much.
    it just means that kids can use it, but it's up to the parents to keep them from hurting themselves. you don't want kids throwing controllers around because they saw an enemy in front of them. the physical dimensions of the headset also artificially limit the age.
    and let's not forget that the games have age restrictions.

    on a still developing body, i could see a few things that could happen, Astigmatism is probably the most likely one that could happen.
    Reply
  • SockPuppet
    The actual reason is because children's eyes aren't far enough apart to center up on the lenses. Which means it will be really blurry and their eyes will tire out quickly trying to compensate. It's like trying to drive your car without your glasses on.
    Reply
  • problematiq
    18361874 said:
    The actual reason is because children's eyes aren't far enough apart to center up on the lenses. Which means it will be really blurry and their eyes will tire out quickly trying to compensate. It's like trying to drive your car without your glasses on.

    This Person is Correct. The reason none of the three VR allow children to play is the distance of their eyes.
    Reply
  • metathias
    My 12 year old could wear the vive just fine. So yeah children will be wearing these. My eldest sons head was big enough to fit a vive since he was like 8.. Big head. The head grows first then everything else.
    Reply
  • problematiq
    18375120 said:
    My 12 year old could wear the vive just fine. So yeah children will be wearing these. My eldest sons head was big enough to fit a vive since he was like 8.. Big head. The head grows first then everything else.

    It's not so much the head size as the eye distance. They say about the age 12-13 is where the eyes are far enough apart to be able to use VR (think some people with tiny heads). When you are using the Vive and you crank up the distance between the lens you will notice it's a tad blurry but still playable. It's just a precaution that the blurred game-play does not adversely effect the children's developing eyes.
    Reply