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Researchers Create First Efficient Flexible Plastic OLED

Zhibin Wang and Michael Helander used in their invention a 50-100 nm thin layer of tantalum oxide on plastic to achieve a refractive index that was previously only delivered by heavy metal-doped glass.

The researchers believe that the technology can reduce the cost of production of OLEDs and bring the vision of flexible OLEDs to the mainstream market. According to the University of Toronto, their display is the first high-efficiency OLED on plastic ever demonstrated.

There was no information when the display technology could become commercially available. Detailed findings of the research project are published in the current issue of Nature Photonics.

  • alidan
    i wouldn't want a plastic display without a clamshell, assuming they mean phones.

    i mean smudges are bad enough, do i have to go back to easy to scratch too?
    Reply
  • Gamer-girl
    This could be used to replace newspapers, e-paper maybe? lol
    Reply
  • de5_Roy
    damn that looks cool.
    i thought some smartphones and tablets with flexible display supposed to come out this year.
    Reply
  • Uberragen21
    Hmmm, Samsung and LG announced this back in November of 2010 and Samsung had working prototypes at the CES in Las Vegas in January 2011. Somehow I fail to see how this is the "first high-efficiency OLED on plastic ever demonstrated".

    What do they mean by high-efficiency? Is it efficiently made (ie cheap to manufacture)? Is it energy efficient, more than Samsung's or LG's flexible OLED screen? Why does this sound like some marketing bs to me?
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  • kyuuketsuki
    Uberragen21Why does this sound like some marketing bs to me?Because the scientists at the University of Toronto have a marketing department?

    Granted, the article really should clarify what exactly is meant by "high-efficiency". Since they say that this should help bring flexible OLEDs to mass-market, I can only assume they mean efficient in terms of being cheaper/easier to manufacture.
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Damn, she's cute =D
    Reply
  • youssef 2010
    Any research that reduces the cost of manufacturing a certain technology is incredible
    Reply
  • IndignantSkeptic
    dammit when do we get OLED screens? i'm sick of waiting; i hate LCD screens.
    Reply
  • back_by_demand
    One step closer to a HArry Potter newspaper
    Reply
  • drwho1
    pretty sure we have seen those on the Harry Potter movies...
    Reply