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Stardock Steam Sale Discounts Games, Software (Updated)

Update, 9/21/2017, 10:04am PDT: Added a link to the sale's page on Steam.

Original story, 9/21/2017, 10:00am PDT:

If you need some new games to play this weekend, Stardock Entertainment has you covered. The publisher/developer has its lineup of titles available at a large discount as part of this weekend’s Steam Publisher sale.

The sale features some of the company’s marquee titles. This includes the real-time strategy (RTS) title Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, which will be available for $20 (the original price was $40). If you prefer a more economical approach to your RTS games, you can try out Offworld Trading Company for $10. Some of the company’s older titles are also on sale. Galactic Civilizations III, which was originally released in 2015, is available for $10 and the standalone expansion Sins of a Solar Empire: Rebellion, which was released in 2012, will only cost you $10.

If you already own some of these games, you can pick up accompanying batches of downloadable content (DLC) at a discount. Multiple bundles are also a part of the sale, so newcomers can get access to the base game and additional DLC without taking a massive dent to their digital wallet.

The company is also discounting some of its non-game software as well. This includes Fences ($7), which automatically organizes your desktop shortcuts, and Start10 ($4), which provides cosmetic customization to your Start menu and creates filtered searches.

The sale starts today, but it’s only around for a limited time. The Stardock Steam Publisher sale is available throughout the weekend and goes through September 25.

  • dstarr3
    Fences is a pretty useful piece of software if you have a cluttered desktop. But there's no reason to get it on Steam. You get the same discount if you go directly to their website, get it there.
    Reply
  • SteveRNG
    Holy cow! I've been using Fences for nearly a decade and never realized they made all those games. Derp.
    Reply
  • bloodroses
    20197061 said:
    Fences is a pretty useful piece of software if you have a cluttered desktop. But there's no reason to get it on Steam. You get the same discount if you go directly to their website, get it there.

    I've been using Fences for quite a few years. It is probably one of the handiest interface tools I have and I almost feel lost without it... lol. You'd think Microsoft would at some point incorporate something similar into their OS.

    Start10 is also quite handy as it helps users slowly get used to Windows 10's new start menu. I have it installed on my father's machine. The best part is you can have the mouse click bring up the Windows 10 menu, and the Windows key bring up the Start10 menu; giving you the best of both worlds. :)
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    20197061 said:
    Fences is a pretty useful piece of software if you have a cluttered desktop. But there's no reason to get it on Steam. You get the same discount if you go directly to their website, get it there.

    If someone wants the software, there's not much reason not to get it on Steam either. Many people would prefer to buy software from a site that they know is more likely to take security seriously, than from some site they've never visited before. And of course, sharing one's billing info with a number of sites is naturally going to be less secure than sharing it with a few, and many people already have accounts with Steam.

    From the developer's perspective, they might keep a little more of the profits from a purchase at their own site, but they also need to handle things like payment processing and distribution for the software and its future updates on their own.
    Reply
  • bloodroses
    20197958 said:
    20197061 said:
    Fences is a pretty useful piece of software if you have a cluttered desktop. But there's no reason to get it on Steam. You get the same discount if you go directly to their website, get it there.

    If someone wants the software, there's not much reason not to get it on Steam either. Many people would prefer to buy software from a site that they know is more likely to take security seriously, than from some site they've never visited before. And of course, sharing one's billing info with a number of sites is naturally going to be less secure than sharing it with a few, and many people already have accounts with Steam.

    From the developer's perspective, they might keep a little more of the profits from a purchase at their own site, but they also need to handle things like payment processing and distribution for the software and its future updates on their own.

    The other nice thing with it being offered on steam is it is like a 'play store' or 'repository' to where it's one less site to have to go to download your software in the case of system re-installs.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    20199764 said:
    20197958 said:
    20197061 said:
    Fences is a pretty useful piece of software if you have a cluttered desktop. But there's no reason to get it on Steam. You get the same discount if you go directly to their website, get it there.

    If someone wants the software, there's not much reason not to get it on Steam either. Many people would prefer to buy software from a site that they know is more likely to take security seriously, than from some site they've never visited before. And of course, sharing one's billing info with a number of sites is naturally going to be less secure than sharing it with a few, and many people already have accounts with Steam.

    From the developer's perspective, they might keep a little more of the profits from a purchase at their own site, but they also need to handle things like payment processing and distribution for the software and its future updates on their own.

    The other nice thing with it being offered on steam is it is like a 'play store' or 'repository' to where it's one less site to have to go to download your software in the case of system re-installs.

    Well, Fences has automatic updating built-in, so it'll alert you when there's a software update. Plus, what I do is I back up all the installation files for software that I use on an external hard drive if I ever need to reinstall. I reinstall whatever old version it might be, then software like this would update itself and problem solved.
    Reply
  • bloodroses
    20199773 said:
    20199764 said:
    20197958 said:
    20197061 said:
    Fences is a pretty useful piece of software if you have a cluttered desktop. But there's no reason to get it on Steam. You get the same discount if you go directly to their website, get it there.

    If someone wants the software, there's not much reason not to get it on Steam either. Many people would prefer to buy software from a site that they know is more likely to take security seriously, than from some site they've never visited before. And of course, sharing one's billing info with a number of sites is naturally going to be less secure than sharing it with a few, and many people already have accounts with Steam.

    From the developer's perspective, they might keep a little more of the profits from a purchase at their own site, but they also need to handle things like payment processing and distribution for the software and its future updates on their own.

    The other nice thing with it being offered on steam is it is like a 'play store' or 'repository' to where it's one less site to have to go to download your software in the case of system re-installs.

    Well, Fences has automatic updating built-in, so it'll alert you when there's a software update. Plus, what I do is I back up all the installation files for software that I use on an external hard drive if I ever need to reinstall. I reinstall whatever old version it might be, then software like this would update itself and problem solved.

    Actually, the old version (version 2) will try to update to version 3 only, no patches in-between. Since version 3 requires a new key (and purchase), update isn't an option. :(
    I also back software up on an external drive, but have had that fail before as well recently.
    If I do end up picking up version 3, it will more than likely be on Steam; just to have yet another form of redundancy.
    Reply