Intel's next-gen Arc Battlemage GPU lineup shipping starts — manifests point to BMG X2 and BMG X3 GPUs

Intel Arc
Intel Arc (Image credit: Intel)

According to shipments manifests discovered by Harukaze5719, in addition to the range-topping version with 32 Xe2 cores (presumably 4,096 stream processors, 512 execution units), the Battlemage lineup for desktop PCs will also have a slightly slower version with 28 Xe2 clusters (presumably 3,584 SPs, 448 EUs).

Intel has yet to formally introduce its next-generation Arc 'Battlemage' products for desktop computers in the coming months. However, new leaks suggest the company may take a page from its Arc Alchemist family when forming its upcoming lineup.

The shipment manifests found by the blogger indicate that Intel is still shipping its BMG X2 and BMG X3 test tools for testing Battlemage GPUs to various countries. The BMG X3 tool was previously known to be a part of the codenamed Churchill Falls card, which carried a GPU with 448 EUs. Given that BMG almost certainly stands for Battlemage, there is no way that Churchill Falls is Intel's Arc A750 with 448 EUs or 3,584 SPs. Instead, it is likely a cut-down version of Intel's next-gen flagship discrete GPU (which presumably has 32 Xe2 cores (512 EUs, 4096 SPs).

So far, we have seen shipment manifests containing three Battlemage graphics processors: the BMG-G10, BMG-G21, and BMG-G31. The BMG-G10 is presumably designed for higher-end graphics cards, and the BMG-G21 is presumably aimed at entry-level graphics boards. The target market for the BMG-G31 is unknown, but since an Intel designer tools webpage confirms its existence, we may be sure it is in the works.

The only thing we do know about the BMG-G31, for now, is that it is set to come in ba a grid array package with 3283 balls (BGA3283), which likely points to the fact that the G31 is Intel's new flagship that has a vast memory bus and a sophisticated power delivery circuitry. To put the number of pins into context, Intel's ACM-G10 — which powers Arc A770/A750/A580 graphics cards — uses a BGA package with 2660 balls. Meanwhile, a BMG X2 tool features 2362 pads, while a BMG X2 tool has 2727 contacts.

That said, it looks like Intel's BMG-G31 will be Intel's new flagship graphics processor. Yet, its exact specifications are difficult to guess at this point. We can only say that it needs more power and has a wider memory bus than the BMG-G10 and BMG-G21.

Anton Shilov
Contributing Writer

Anton Shilov is a contributing writer at Tom’s Hardware. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • Metal Messiah.
    We don't know for sure whether X2 and X3 are internal GPU codenames, or these are the test tools being used for verification.

    The BMG X3 tool was previously known to be a part of the codenamed Churchill Falls card, which carried a GPU with 448 EUs.

    The BMG-G10 is presumably designed for higher-end graphics cards,

    Was ? "Churchill Falls" is reportedly the canceled SKU based on the BMG-G10 die.

    Based on some recent reports, the BMG-G10 GPU die appears to have been canceled. The space is now filled with the BMG-G21 and BMG-G31 dies. So, no, there is no 448 EU variant in the pipeline.


    the Battlemage lineup for desktop PCs will also have a slightly slower version with 28 Xe2 clusters (presumably 3,584 SPs, 448 EUs).

    As mentioned above since the BMG-G10 GPU die appears to have been canceled, the possibility of having a 448 EU variant in the pipeline is very less.


    Edit:

    If you read the shipping manifest carefully, you can see that the "X3" graphics card GPU codename is also associated with the BMG-G10 GPU die, sporting 448EUs. The entries all show an older year/date i.e. 2023.

    So this means the X3 GPU is also not certain. It might have been cancelled as well.That leaves only X2 on the table, and the G31 die.
    Reply
  • Notton
    My money is on one of these being the workstation Arc Pro series or the mobile variant.
    The confusion around the specs makes more sense to me when they are separated.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    The only thing we do know about the BMG-G31, for now, is that it is set to come in ba a grid array package with 3283 balls (BGA3283), which likely points to the fact that the G31 is Intel's new flagship that has a vast memory bus and a sophisticated power delivery circuitry.

    That said, it looks like Intel's BMG-G31 will be Intel's new flagship graphics processor.

    We discussed on this topic before as well, in one of the previous articles.

    YES, as per BGA array configuration of 3283 pins, the G31 should be the high-end processor, but if we go by Intel's own naming convention logic, it could be one of the lower end part as well.

    Because, take the ARC Alchemist lineup as an example. The top flagship die was the "Arc ACM-G10", which came with 32 Xe cores. And the ACM G11 and G12 dies were the lower end parts, respectively. So based on this logic, the G31 is not the flagship die.

    But again, nothing is certain, and there is some confusion right now.

    Both the theories contradict each other. Because, if we assume the G31 is indeed the smaller or an entry-level die, then why is the BGA 3283 array package being used for it ? So many questions, no definitive answer yet !

    Because the article itself claims, "The BMG-G10 is presumably designed for higher-end graphics cards, and the BMG-G21 is presumably aimed at entry-level graphics boards."


    By the way,
    some BMG G21 entries were also spotted. Intel seems to be testing active-fan heatsinks with these ES/engineering samples.

    https://i.imgur.com/IIVO1hv.png
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    Notton said:
    My money is on one of these being the workstation Arc Pro series or the mobile variant.

    I'm sure Intel will release the PRO variants as well, once these consumer desktop parts have created a strong foothold in the market. Previous gen had the Arc PRO A40/50/60 SKUs released on time though.

    And we also got the Arc PRO A30M/60M parts on the mobile end. :)
    Reply
  • jlake3
    "Intel's next-gen Arc Battlemage GPU lineup shipping starts — manifests point to BMG X2 and BMG X3 GPUs" feels like one heck of a clickbait-and-switch headline when you get to the point that they're actually shipping test tools. "Battlemage GPU lineup shipping starts" really implies that the dies that will form part of the consumer Battlemage lineup are shipping (likely to partners), and not that they're moving early test tools around.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    Yeah, the headline is a bit misleading to say the least !
    Reply
  • TechyIT223
    Expect an early 2025 launch timeline for these cards.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    A recent report by DigiTimes has once again confirmed that Intel will utilize TSMC's 4nm process node for its Arc Battlemage "Xe2" discrete GPUs, which is a huge jump from the Alchemist lineup, which was built upon the 6nm process.

    TSMC's 4nm node provides an 11% performance improvement over the N5 (4nm); hence, the improvement will be much higher than the 6nm. Apart from that, the process is known to be much more power efficient, contributing to Battlemage's power consumption figures.

    This isn't an entirely new report or claim by the way, since Taiwanese tech site "Ctee" hinted on this development in April.

    https://www.ctee.com.tw/news/20230403700019-430502

    https://images.ctee.com.tw/newsphoto/2023-04-03/1024/20230403700021.jpg
    Reply
  • kRestyCrab
    Would love to see an actual Intel GPU that can actually perform well.. Am disappointed that they’ve always been, all paper and no real world, actual performance that could challenge the competition. Just look at poor MSI Claw, theyre still clinging for that hope that a ‘magical’ driver release could squuze out a few more fps. :(
    Reply
  • TechyIT223
    kRestyCrab said:
    Would love to see an actual Intel GPU that can actually perform well.. Am disappointed that they’ve always been, all paper and no real world, actual performance that could challenge the competition. Just look at poor MSI Claw, theyre still clinging for that hope that a ‘magical’ driver release could squuze out a few more fps. :(

    What is your current GPU which you using for gaming and other applications?
    Reply