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Super Talent Project X DDR4-3733 16GB Memory Review

Our Verdict

Super Talent’s 2x 8GB DDR4-3733 CAS 17 kit performed excellently and has excellent tuning capacity. We hope the firm is able to address the 10% price premium compared to similarly-rated competitors.

For

  • Great performance
  • Great for latency tuning

Against

  • Mediocre overclocking
  • Competitive price disadvantage

Introducing Project X DDR4-3733

Made most famous for producing the world’s fastest DDR3 straight out of Silicon Valley, Super Talent slipped completely off the enthusiast radar almost immediately after losing that crown to its competitors. Once again relying on its Project X to win back the enthusiast market, the firm sent its F3733UA8G modules for our evaluation.

Specifications

Two of those modules comprise its F3733UX16G kit, for which the packaging was not yet available when the company shipped our samples. Hoping to get the message out about its latest RAM early, the company even sent us its direct pricing list rather than a list of distributors, and it promised that buyers would be able to secure memory directly while it works with Ma Labs and Amazon on distribution.

One of the big changes to its current run at the enthusiast market is that it competitors have already reached high target frequencies. Another difference is that these modules were produced in Super Talent’s Chinese facility, rather than its small facility in Silicon Valley. We see high hopes for mass marketing in this manufacturing strategy.

The modules are rated at the same 17-19-19-39 timings as two of its large competitors, and will boot at DDR4-2133 CAS 16 prior to enabling a motherboard’s XMP profile setting.

Test Setup

The Asus ROG Maximus IX Hero aids our Core i7-7700K in achieving data rates beyond DDR4-4000 at the 1.35V DIMM limit suggested by Intel, using an actual firmware setting of 1.34V. MSI’s GTX 1080 Armor OC addresses the GPU bottleneck normally found in the gaming performance analysis of memory reviews, while Toshiba’s OCZ-RD400 M.2 drive uses an NVMe interface to provide maximum throughput in our file compression benchmark.

Supplied for use in motherboard reviews, G.Skill’s 32GB four DIMM DDR4-3866 kit is the starting point for today’s review. Teamgroup’s DDR4-3600 takes the other side of the 3600-3733-3866 data rate spread, while the broader availability of Mushkin’s DDR4-3200 provides an easier alternative purchasing option.


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  • LezNato
    Too bad you guys didn't test it on and motherboard. I wonder how high it could be pushed there.
    Reply
  • LezNato
    Ehh I meant AMD
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    No LEDs. I'm almost willing to buy it on that basis alone.
    Reply
  • CRO5513Y
    Interesting they didn't do much on the aesthetics in terms of Heatsink, colour, LEDs, etc. Since they are targeting the enthusiast market i would expect a flashy design and aesthetics like the Trident Z, Corsair Dominators, etc.

    *Edit* ^ Guy above is a perfect example.
    Reply
  • fullauto2009
    "Super Talent’s 2x 8GB DDR4-3733 CAS 17 kit performce excellently"
    Reply
  • littleleo
    I've not been too happy with the quality since they moved most of the manufacturing out of the US to China. They cut the warranty on their RAM from Lifetime to 5 years so they must not trust it either.

    So to sum up good kit with just okay OCing, and very bland looks for an over priced kit.
    Reply
  • Antonio_34
    It's 3733 pretty well OC enough when CPU's don't officially support that speed anyways? Will this work with Ryzen or is that a mother board limitation?
    Reply
  • Crashman
    19544733 said:
    It's 3733 pretty well OC enough when CPU's don't officially support that speed anyways? Will this work with Ryzen or is that a mother board limitation?
    It won't run at that speed on Ryzen. It still boots at DDR4-2133 CAS 15 without using the XMP program though, so you're welcome to use it in an attempt to overclock the processor's memory controller.

    Reply
  • Brian_227
    Clearly it's THE best memory. It's printed right on there! You can't lie about that.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    All these Superfast memories Are quite meh with Intel board because They give only very Little more speed, but all of these would be super interesting with AMD Ryzen setup that seems to love really high speed memory.
    Hopefully we see definitely AMD memory speed test in some point. Maybe not yet, because mother board bioses ere still very young, but maybe during the summer?
    I really would like to know the sweet spot for memory to Ryzen. For Intel, the sweet spot is the cheapest and slowist you can get...
    Reply