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MSI Raising GPU Prices Due to Tariffs Too

An MSI-branded GPU
(Image credit: MSI)

MSI will be raising the prices of its GPUs due to U.S. tariffs, putting it in line with other AIB companies like Asus, EVGA and Zotac, Tom's Hardware has confirmed.

In a Tom's Hardware CES livestream, MSI components specialist David Yee answered a question from GPU editor Jarred Walton (you can see this at 48:43 in the video embedded below).

"I can confirm that MSI will be raising the prices on its graphics cards due to the reimplementation, to the reactivation of tariffs," Yee said. "It’s for that reason, you know, we’re still working on the prices."

The pricing issues apply to some of the products that MSI announced at this CES, including its newest GPU, the Sea Hawk, which water cools an Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 or RTX 3090 with a 240mm radiator.

"For Sea Hawk, we just announced it today, but like I mentioned, we’re still trying to figure out how to bring it in from our factory," Yee told us. "We haven’t even decided how much we’re going to price it just because the cost of the shipping and the tax we have to pay just to have the border customs release it to us. So that’s something we don’t have finalized information. But we can say that there will be a price increase."

Right now, you're lucky to even find any of the best graphics cards in stock, whether it be one of the latest from either Nvidia or AMD. But when they have been available, they have been scooped up quickly, and sometimes sold again on platforms like eBay for a premium by scalpers.

Yee's statement also suggests that logistics of getting the GPUs into the United States alone could cause stock shortages. So it sounds like getting a GPU won't be any easier anytime soon.

For your best shot at finding a new GPU see our articles on where to buy an RTX 3060 Ti, 3070, 3080 or 3090 and where to buy a Radeon RX 6800 or RX 6800 XT.

  • spongiemaster
    Not sure what the point of raising prices on products that aren't for sale is. Outside of EVGA's sign up queue, has anyone gotten a card past launch day? Looking at nowinstock.com, most cards have never been in stock, and the most recent card that was in stock was mid November.

    https://www.nowinstock.net/computers/videocards/nvidia/rtx3080/
    We're 4 months past launch. If they're continually being sent to retailers, and getting produced in the volume that Nvidia's quarterly results indicate, seriously, where are all these cards going?
    Reply
  • thepersonwithaface45
    spongiemaster said:
    Not sure what the point of raising prices on products that aren't for sale is. Outside of EVGA's sign up queue, has anyone gotten a card past launch day? Looking at nowinstock.com, most cards have never been in stock, and the most recent card that was in stock was mid November.

    https://www.nowinstock.net/computers/videocards/nvidia/rtx3080/
    We're 4 months past launch. If they're continually being sent to retailers, and getting produced in the volume that Nvidia's quarterly results indicate, seriously, where are all these cards going?
    Microcenter saves lives, go there on a thursday morning when they open.
    Microcenter said they had a 3090 so I went to check it out and there was a line of 30 people and they had enough 3080s for everyone. I didn't even know they had them, but that's because they don't post their stock online
    Reply
  • Dantte
    Um, MSI is already charging 2X MSRP, scalping, on their official Amazon store page... Please explain how this matters?
    Reply
  • danlw
    I think tarrifs are an excuse. They realized they set the MSRP too low and are looking for an excuse to raise them without appearing greedy.
    Reply
  • Jim90
    Clearly, there's been practically zero consumer stock produced from both AMD and Nvidia (some months now), and no, this is nothing to do with scalping - the volume on ebay etc obviously comes nowhere near even getting close to explaining this. For AMD, the primary reason is that those two console contracts are still some way from being filled - buying one is still extremely difficult. Nvidia are clearly busy selling original stock direct to miners. They have also, clearly, yet to ramp up that early-forced(thanks to AMD) Ti/Super variant production. A truly bizarre situation indeed. Meanwhile the PC enthusiast sector becomes that bit more...displeased!
    AMD have done extremely well over the last few years, and seriously disrupted both CPU and GPU sectors. For that enthusiast sector there is, unfortunately, a clear and present risk that that all hard work in winning hearts and minds with their GPU's will be increasingly compromised if Nvidia release in volume first - and that would be a damn shame.
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    spongiemaster said:
    Not sure what the point of raising prices on products that aren't for sale is. Outside of EVGA's sign up queue, has anyone gotten a card past launch day? Looking at nowinstock.com, most cards have never been in stock, and the most recent card that was in stock was mid November.
    I've noticed the same thing. GPUs don't appear to actually be making it into retail. I sometimes see a stock bot on Twitter or Discord report stock, but it's always immediately followed by people complaining that the product is out of stock -- we're talking fractions of a second of availability if it was ever actually available in the first place. A lot of stock bots haven't reported stock in a month or two. Zero notification emails either.

    Nvidia keeps running contests to win a GPU, but I don't see anyone actually receiving a GPU from them either.

    I think PC gaming is going to be in for a rough future if these stock and pricing issues aren't solved soon. I don't see people sticking with PC gaming when Newegg's deal of the day is a 2060 Super priced at $800. XBox and PS5 models do actually show up for sale at MSRP, and I know people who have them. The only person I know who has 30-series cards is the scalper at work.
    Reply
  • btmedic04
    This is pure greed as prices are raising internationally. The US tariffs just give manufacturers an excuse to save face.
    Reply