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Power Consumption

The SSD 730 Series Review: Intel Is Back With Its Own Controller
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Idle Power Consumption

Idle consumption is the most important power metric for consumer and client SSDs. After all, solid-state drives complete host commands quickly, and then drop back down to idle. Aside from the occasional background garbage collection, a modern SSD spends most of its life doing very little. Enterprise-oriented drives are more frequently used at full tilt, making their idle power numbers less relevant. But this just isn't the case on the desktop, where the demands of client and consumer computing leave most SSDs sitting on their hands for long stretches of time.

Active idle power numbers are critical, especially when it comes to their impact on mobile platforms. Idle means different things on different systems, though. Pretty much every drive we're testing is capable of one or more low-power states, up to and including DevSleep. That last feature is a part of the SATA 3.2 host specification. And while it requires a capable SSD and a compatible platform, enabling it takes power consumption down to a very small number.

Intel's SSDs are immediately split into two groups: the SSD DC S3500 and S3700 in the middle, and the SSD 730 at the very bottom. A higher controller clock rate and faster NAND interface demand a corresponding increase in power consumption. So, the performance-oriented SSD 730 registers the highest idle power use of any drive we've tested. That's not necessarily a big deal in a desktop or workstation, but it's probably going to keep you from installing one of these in a notebook.

PCMark 7 Average Power Consumption

If we log power consumption through a workload, even a relatively heavy one, we see that average use is still pretty close to the idle numbers. Maximum power may spike fiercely, but the draw during a PCMark 7 run is pretty light. You can see the drives fall back down to the idle "floor" between peaks of varying intensity.

All three Intel drives are fast, addressing PCMark 7's storage test and dropping back to idle quickly. That helps even out the average power consumption measurement through our run. Then again, the SSD 730 Series pulls nearly twice as much power as Intel's SSD DC S3x00s. 

More aggressive performance specs register as a big jump in idle power consumption, especially. Though, given the intended enthusiast and prosumer audiences, we're not really sure how much of a knock that should be. As we've seen from other vendors, going all-out for the best possible results is a viable approach, so long as you know where the hardware is appropriate and where other options are more apropos.

Maximum Observed Power Consumption

The SSD 730 brings up the rear yet again, posting peak figures in excess of almost every other SATA-based drive. In the grand scheme of things, though, none of these SSDs use much power. In some sort of battery-powered devices, sure, you'd be looking at a problem. But in a desktop application, the hundreds of watts used by overclocked CPUs and graphics cards are more statistically relevant.

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  • 8 Hide
    g-unit1111 , February 27, 2014 6:15 PM
    $1/GB???? I'll stick with my 840 Evo for the time being, thanks.
  • 2 Hide
    blackmagnum , February 27, 2014 6:22 PM
    That skull on an Intel SSD means this product is the Big Kahuna. Samsung just cannot crush this competition.
  • -2 Hide
    Amdlova , February 27, 2014 7:53 PM
    that 480 drain more than a 5400rpm HDD. Samsung or sandisk for laptops. Please next SSD
  • 5 Hide
    jdwii , February 27, 2014 11:35 PM
    Nice to see the 840 Pro doing good
  • -1 Hide
    rokit , February 28, 2014 2:29 AM
    Never expected Intel to fail like that. Samsung still offers the best performance/power consumption/$
    I guess that skull did the job, power of signs )

    p.s. this site has [removed] level editing in non-forum mode(the one you see and use by default)

    Watch the language. - G
  • 6 Hide
    Tanquen , February 28, 2014 9:16 AM
    GiB me a break. A GB is 1024MB not 1000.
  • 0 Hide
    mamasan2000 , February 28, 2014 10:17 PM
    I don't see why the Intel SSD is any good. It's midpack at best at everything. Even my cheap Sandisk is better and it was the cheapest SSD I could get around here (besides Kingston).
  • 0 Hide
    unityole , March 2, 2014 4:08 AM
    how is samsung the best? http://www.tweaktown.com/blogs/Chris_Ramseyer/58/real-world-ssd-performance-why-time-matters-when-testing/index.htmlsandisk and toshiba SSD, look at the chart and see the performance for yourself. Evo doing well, but thats only cause of the SLC flash helping it.
  • -1 Hide
    eriko , March 2, 2014 11:57 PM
    All this Samsung love here... I have two brand new 840 Evo 250GB drives, and they are garbage.In fact they are so poor, I had to separate all my files, and break the RAID,and have two individual volumes, so as to have Trim enabled, and also Magician running, otherwise, terrible read and write (especially) performance resulted. I did verify they were genuine drives too. As soon as you begin to fill up these 250GB Evos, performance falls off a cliff.I'm now not a believer in TLC, and wish I had waited to get the Pro's (not available in this part of the world), as I hear much better things about them.But I've had my fill of reading reviews on consumer drives, I'm going to California in a week or so, and so I will either get 2 x 400GB S3700's, or a single 800GB S3700 (and to hell with RAID). Enterprise drives are the bomb, and don't forget that. Lost way too much time and data now with 'consumer' drives...By the way, X25E 64GB still going strong without so much as a hiccup. Not even a burp... If they made a 640GB X25E, I think I'd suck their, ok, I won't say that but you get the idea.
  • 0 Hide
    zzzaac , March 3, 2014 4:48 PM
    Just curious, this speed, would you be able to tell that it is faster, or is it just though benchmarks?.This ssd is quite expensive at my local parts shop
  • 0 Hide
    unityole , March 5, 2014 1:30 AM
    the numbers in benchmark is a joke, especially rapid mode. its a completely useless thing to show off to consumer to grab more market share. overclock the controller to make it look faster and with SLC 4k looks fast. but overall its sh*t, sorry to say but its the truth, this is how samsung works LOL.
  • 0 Hide
    eriko , March 5, 2014 1:32 AM
    Quote:
    All this Samsung love here... I have two brand new 840 Evo 250GB drives, and they are garbage.In fact they are so poor, I had to separate all my files, and break the RAID,and have two individual volumes, so as to have Trim enabled, and also Magician running, otherwise, terrible read and write (especially) performance resulted. I did verify they were genuine drives too. As soon as you begin to fill up these 250GB Evos, performance falls off a cliff.I'm now not a believer in TLC, and wish I had waited to get the Pro's (not available in this part of the world), as I hear much better things about them.But I've had my fill of reading reviews on consumer drives, I'm going to California in a week or so, and so I will either get 2 x 400GB S3700's, or a single 800GB S3700 (and to hell with RAID). Enterprise drives are the bomb, and don't forget that. Lost way too much time and data now with 'consumer' drives...By the way, X25E 64GB still going strong without so much as a hiccup. Not even a burp... If they made a 640GB X25E, I think I'd suck their, ok, I won't say that but you get the idea.
    EDIT: To the sad *ucker who thumbed-down my scathing opinion of the 840 Evo's, try this one for size:Quote from SSDenduarancetest.com:I would strongly advice against using the Samsung 840 EVO in any RAID setup with DURABLE WRITE PERFORMANCE IS MIND.TRIM is necessary to keep this SSD in good shape. This rules out most RAID setups, which prevents the use of TRIM. The test average write speed is very indicative. It will most likely settle at just above 20MB/s. Please remember that these numbers are for high load steady state. Initially this drive performed well over 200MB/s, this will most likely be the typical speed when kept in good shape using TRIM. Burst speeds will be higher. So you see? They are sh1te. 19MB/s write performance from 840 Evo's is not what somebody intends to pay for.... And don't forget these drives easily slow down, as you fill them up.Since I only just bought them, I will secure-erase, repackage, and give them away as gifts when I return to Europe...TLC isn't worth a dime.
  • 0 Hide
    emv , March 5, 2014 1:27 PM
    I don't see where this SSD is faster than other SSDs? it might be more consistent based on its enterprise design (how is it much different than 3500?) but it is average on the tests. is it even noticeably much faster than 530? what are we missing?
  • 0 Hide
    dusty13 , March 19, 2014 9:51 AM
    i am really sorry intel did not do better. i like them and was looking forward to an at least halfway competitive drive ... not what we got here.higher pricetag ok, that i expected, but double the price of other drives that are faster, more energy-efficient and cooler (in temperature and styling - whats with the ridiculous skull?!) ... that actually is kind of offensive to a fan like me who loved tha old x25