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Real-World Performance And Battery Life

Motorola Xoom: The First Android 3.1 (Honeycomb) Tablet
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Real-World Benchmarks

Early on we discovered how difficult it is to benchmark tablets.

Apple iPad: Input Lag Benchmark

Benchmarking responsiveness with a camera is the fastest approach. Of course, normal cameras won't cut it, since they only shoot at 29 FPS. That's unacceptable if you're trying to measure precise time differences. Going the stop-watch route is no better due to human-introduced errors. That's why I'm using a 1000 FPS high-speed camera to measure performance. Since, 1 frame = 1 millisecond, it’s possible to measure timings with a high degree of accuracy.

The iPad 2 and Xoom employ the same CPU hardware, but the 10 second difference in boot-up time suggests that iOS is a fundamentally leaner operating system. When we look at browser launch times, the Chrome browser in Honeycomb definitely seems more boated than iOS's Safari, since the Xoom under-performs both iPads.

Input lag is the time that passed between pressing a key and text appearing on-screen. This tells you how fast the Xoom is registering an action. Ideally, you want low input lag so that you don't feel the tablet stuttering as you type or click on buttons. The average college student has a reaction time of 200 milliseconds for visual stimuli, so there's no perceptible lag while you're typing with the Xoom.

Battery Life


Testing a tablet’s battery life tends to be highly variable unless you control the entire experience from beginning to end. Cumulatively, touch gestures don’t have a great impact on battery life. The biggest factors are CPU/GPU processing, screen brightness, volume, and Wi-Fi use. In order to accurately measure battery life, I coded a script that automatically plays MP3s at 50% volume while browsing different Wikipedia pages every 12 minutes. This benchmark is probably overkill, but it gives you an idea of a worst-case scenario.


Recharge Time

Charging times are a double-edged sword. Ideally, you want a nice slow charge so that your battery lasts more than a few hundred charges. Fast charge times keep you away from the wall socket longer, but in the long run it cuts down on the health of the battery. Usually, the rate of charge starts to slow down somewhere in the 80% to 95% range, which is why the charging time from 0% to 10% is faster than 90% to 100%.

Wireless Performance

It's wrong to look only at throughput to get a sense of network speed, because there are other factors that affect wireless performance. Latency, processing time, and the type of data being sent also affect the perceived "fastness" of a network connection.

Think of a phone call. Throughput is the audio quality. Latency is the amount of time from when you speak into the phone until the person on the other side hears you. And processing time is the delay as you think of a response to a question and speak into the phone. If we apply this to networking, throughput is the amount of data you can send over time, latency is the lag due to data transmission, while processing time is the overhead incurred by receiving the data.

Load Web Page (seconds)
CNN
Google
iPad
6.59
1.80
iPad 2
5.85
1.53
Xoom
5.79
0.49


Now consider that latency plus processing time equals response time. This is where the Xoom holds an advantage over the iPad 2. Even though Motorola uses the same 802.11a/b/g Wi-Fi + Bluetooth 2.1 controller (Broadcom's BCM4329) as both iPads, the Xoom places a processing priority on network tasks, so it benefits from better response time and better throughput. However, Chrome seems to have a bigger processing overhead, so there's basically no speed advantage in Web page rendering.

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  • 4 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , July 8, 2011 5:06 AM
    Very impressive review, especially the display quality page. A lot of in-depth information.
  • 3 Hide
    joytech22 , July 8, 2011 5:34 AM
    Excellent! Covered everything I was interested in when comparing the iPad 2 to the Xoom.
  • 4 Hide
    tramit , July 8, 2011 5:54 AM
    Excellent review. I also agree that the excuse of Android coming later in the game does not mean it cannot have the same growth in apps in the same alotted time frame that it was released.

    I personally feel that the iPad is a better device for gaming just by going through the app store and being able to find games ranging from Monopoly to FF3 and Infinity Blade. I have a Nexus S right now and the list of attractive games is not as long.

    I like having both devices however. I plan to stay the course with continuing to purchase Android Nexus phones and having Apple supply me with their iPad. I get to enjoy the best of both worlds and not narrow my enjoyment of tech like most Droid and Apple fanboys.
  • 3 Hide
    Maziar , July 8, 2011 6:06 AM
    Excellent review.
    I'm impressed with the honeycomb but I think it has 2 major drawbacks
    1)UI is somehow laggy and not 100% smooth
    2)Lack of apps.
    If these 2 issues get fixed,then we're going to see a better competition
  • 1 Hide
    fstrthnu , July 8, 2011 6:06 AM
    A little late, but very good quality review. Very nice to see custom benchmarks, it really shows you guys put in the effort here.

    I'd probably go for a Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1, but that's just me.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , July 8, 2011 8:40 AM
    Seems HD video playback was not tested. Nice to have a HDMI option, but not really useful if most HD movies cannot play smoothly as is the case with the XOOM.

    Also, and probably related to the slow video, Tegra 2's CPU has no NEON extensions, limiting applications that use signal processing.

    Yes, I do own a XOOM (also iPad 2 by the way)
  • 1 Hide
    acku , July 8, 2011 8:42 AM
    Quote:
    Seems HD video playback was not tested. Nice to have a HDMI option, but not really useful if most HD movies cannot play smoothly as is the case with the XOOM.

    Also, and probably related to the slow video, Tegra 2's CPU has no NEON extensions, limiting applications that use signal processing.

    Yes, I do own a XOOM (also iPad 2 by the way)



    Check out page 13. We tested H.264 battery life using a ripped 1280x720 Blu-ray movie.

    On page 12, we also show HD playblack when you're mirroring the display.

    @Everyone else. Thanks for the comments guys. If there's anything else you guy want to see in future reviews please let us know.

    Cheers,
    Andrew Ku
    TomsHardware.com
  • -2 Hide
    house70 , July 8, 2011 11:40 AM
    Took quite a while to get this review done. Other tablets are already available that sport Honeycomb. Not to mention they are better than both contenders described in this article. I have a Transformer and no matter what I throw at it, it does it well. A review of that would be nice (maybe in another year or so...).
    Good effort, but as others have said, late to the table.
  • -2 Hide
    house70 , July 8, 2011 11:46 AM
    What the reviewer perceives as weaknesses, others perceive as strength. Example: the apps installation process. Not having to deal with iTunes is a bonus in itself, and having the option to make your own backups using whatever application you prefer is also a plus. The reviewer got a bit carried away by his personal bias towards iTunes/iOS environment. There are people that prefer to be led by hand while operating their tablet and there are others that prefer to pick and choose their options without limitations. It's a matter of personal preference. But this should not transpire into an objective review. Other than that, not too bad.
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , July 8, 2011 12:08 PM
    Wow - I couldn't disagree more with some of your views. Obviously you love you some Apple... I'm not an Apple hater - I have a Macbook Pro, I have an iPad, and I have a Xoom. I tell everyone the Xoom is 5X the tables the iPad is (Granted it's an iPad, not an iPad2 - but my beef with iPads are how much Apple controls what you can or can't do with it - that has not changed in the new generation of iPads). The iPad I can use as a toy, or as a cool media gadget - I actually basically gave it to my 6 year old son now bc that's all I can do with it. The Xoom I can use as so much more - it is was more useful on so many levels. Yes rendering takes a bit longer when you flip th screen, yes there are a few small quirks in it's behavior occasionally, but from an overall usefulness point of view I like it TONS betters than the iPad. Widgets - MultiTasking - OpenSource app development with an App store NOT controlled by Apple. Android IS the future for tablets. Apple needs to take note - they are just lucky at this point bc of their following, but Android will leave them in the dust. MS isn't even in the game and won't be even when Windows 8 hits. And you price comparison is off too IMO. $599 (now $499) for 32MB on the Xoom was in line (and is now better) than Apple's price point. Take it a step further and look the the Asus Eee Pad Transformer (very similar to Xoom with some things done even better) at $399. Android is taking hold, and will gain on Apple quickly, and eventually blow them away.
  • 4 Hide
    acku , July 8, 2011 12:15 PM
    house70Took quite a while to get this review done. Other tablets are already available that sport Honeycomb. Not to mention they are better than both contenders described in this article. I have a Transformer and no matter what I throw at it, it does it well. A review of that would be nice (maybe in another year or so...).Good effort, but as others have said, late to the table.


    I'll take that shot. Understand that we just started in with tablets. So we're playing catch up, but we're not purposely reviewing tablets late.

    That said, I don't think it's necessary to be snarky about it.

    Quote:
    What the reviewer perceives as weaknesses, others perceive as strength. Example: the apps installation process. Not having to deal with iTunes is a bonus in itself, and having the option to make your own backups using whatever application you prefer is also a plus. The reviewer got a bit carried away by his personal bias towards iTunes/iOS environment. There are people that prefer to be led by hand while operating their tablet and there are others that prefer to pick and choose their options without limitations. It's a matter of personal preference. But this should not transpire into an objective review. Other than that, not too bad.


    I'll agree that we can disagree. But I don't think that makes my concerns any less valid. And it's true that many people don't care for that hand holding experience, but again, that is why I called the iPad a Wii and the Xoom a PS3.

    I'm speaking from experience as an Android AND iOS developer. The hoops that you have to jump through for the Apple App store are infuriating. But if you're a tablet user, you don't care that said developer had to wrack his brain dealing with Apple. You just want to know apps are available. No tablet platform can truly succeed without third-party application support. This is a reality that everyone has to face. It's also a reason that Apple still struggles in the notebook and desktop market with OS X. There are more programs for Windows that you can't run on Mac. Until this changes, the playing field is going to be uneven.

  • 5 Hide
    acku , July 8, 2011 12:21 PM
    WebologyWORXWow - I couldn't disagree more with some of your views. Obviously you love you some Apple... I'm not an Apple hater - I have a Macbook Pro, I have an iPad, and I have a Xoom. I tell everyone the Xoom is 5X the tables the iPad is (Granted it's an iPad, not an iPad2 - but my beef with iPads are how much Apple controls what you can or can't do with it - that has not changed in the new generation of iPads). The iPad I can use as a toy, or as a cool media gadget - I actually basically gave it to my 6 year old son now bc that's all I can do with it. The Xoom I can use as so much more - it is was more useful on so many levels. Yes rendering takes a bit longer when you flip th screen, yes there are a few small quirks in it's behavior occasionally, but from an overall usefulness point of view I like it TONS betters than the iPad. Widgets - MultiTasking - OpenSource app development with an App store NOT controlled by Apple. Android IS the future for tablets. Apple needs to take note - they are just lucky at this point bc of their following, but Android will leave them in the dust. MS isn't even in the game and won't be even when Windows 8 hits. And you price comparison is off too IMO. $599 (now $499) for 32MB on the Xoom was in line (and is now better) than Apple's price point. Take it a step further and look the the Asus Eee Pad Transformer (very similar to Xoom with some things done even better) at $399. Android is taking hold, and will gain on Apple quickly, and eventually blow them away.


    Everyone who criticizes Apple for some reason feels the need to say they own an Apple product, as if that somehow means something. It doesn't really matter what you own. Anyone can have a valid opinion.

    I understand your view, I just disagree with it. The idea that open source dominates doesn't jive with what every computer user experiences. Look at Linux. If open source was simply the issue, Ubuntu should kill Windows and OS X within the next few years. That's simply not the case.

    I'm an Android and iOS developer. In fact I have to program in both because some of the benchmarks we use are custom coded. As a reader, though, most people could care less how much effort I put into a program. They just want to look at the results. No tablet platform can truly succeed without third-party application support. This is a reality that everyone has to face. It's also a reason that Apple still struggles in the notebook and desktop market with OS X. There are more programs for Windows that you can't run on Mac. Until this changes, the playing field is going to be uneven.


    And on that note, if the Xoom was all that and a bag of chips, Motorola wouldn't admit it's struggling with sales and drop the price.
  • 0 Hide
    Onus , July 8, 2011 1:36 PM
    For the same amount of money, I can get a Brazos-based notebook with superior performance, more applications, a real keyboard, expandability, full interoperability with my PC, and the only thing I'll give up is some battery life (but apparently not all that much); oh, and an extra camera.

    I just don't see a tablet in my future.
  • 0 Hide
    lamorpa , July 8, 2011 1:49 PM
    jtt283For the same amount of money, I can get a Brazos-based notebook with superior performance, more applications, a real keyboard, expandability, full interoperability with my PC, and the only thing I'll give up is some battery life (but apparently not all that much); oh, and an extra camera. I just don't see a tablet in my future.

    You'll also have to give up not having a keyboard and display stand.
  • 1 Hide
    smeker , July 8, 2011 2:45 PM
    jtt283For the same amount of money, I can get a Brazos-based notebook with superior performance, more applications, a real keyboard, expandability, full interoperability with my PC, and the only thing I'll give up is some battery life (but apparently not all that much); oh, and an extra camera. I just don't see a tablet in my future.


    I m really happy for you and for sharing this news which has nothing to do with the article.... Keep up with the great trolling job! :) 
  • -1 Hide
    drchemist , July 8, 2011 2:53 PM
    Galaxy Tab 10.1 was the FIRST tablet with Honeycomb 3.1 by almost 1 month. Change your headline. Google I/O doesn't count since it was a limited test edition for developers. Consumer released version on June 8. Check it.
  • 2 Hide
    acku , July 8, 2011 2:57 PM
    drchemistGalaxy Tab 10.1 was the FIRST tablet with Honeycomb 3.1 by almost 1 month. Change your headline. Google I/O doesn't count since it was a limited test edition for developers. Consumer released version on June 8. Check it.


    Not true at all.
    http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/10/google-announces-android-3-1
    5/10 3.1 was available to Verizon Xoom owners. Xoom was first 3.0 and first 3.1
  • -1 Hide
    winterblade , July 8, 2011 3:16 PM
    Hello guys. A few months ago I really thought tablets were just a gimmick and that, iOS or Android, I would never get one, then I noticed that more and more frequently I rather use my Motoroi (the mexican version of the original Droid) than my laptop (a Dell Studio XPS 13) for simple tasks like chat, light browsing, checking mail and hell even for gaming I found myself using more and more my phone, but I really get tired soon because of the small display... so it soon became a no brainer that I wanted a tablet.

    I could really not say if it´s because I'm waaaaaaaaay more used to use android devices than iOS ones, but seriously, iPad being more intuitive than the Xoom my ass... I love the Android buttons in my phone and I love the software buttons in my Xoom. Of course iPad is going to be more intuitive if you are an iPhone user, is the same frikkin OS. I'm a PC user and as such I can tell you I feel at home with android from day one, iOS and OS X, even when pretty at first sight, are just not enough functional for me and I really find no value in that famous "apple experience" and since mankind is yet to design a experience-o-metter it is my humble opinion that in an OBJECTIVE review it should not be regarded over and over again, maybe in an editorial, but not in a review.

    About people saying they rather get a netbook or even a notebook instead a tablet (I was one of those not long ago) The only thing I can say is that if some one manage to make a 1.5 pound netbook with the 8-9 hours of constant use I can get from my Xoom I will agree with you then, but not today, tablets do have advantages over traditional systems.
  • 1 Hide
    irtehyar , July 8, 2011 3:22 PM
    Good article.

    I'm an android phone owner and an ipad owner, and am slowly being converted to iOS for mobile simply because of the vast amount of applications I use that aren't even similarly available on the Android OS. This is painful for me because I'm a Windows programmer and I despise Apple, assemble my own PCs, etc. I'm pretty typical there I guess. But in the end, I just want something that does what I want (music and language apps, mostly), and when it comes to tablet software, only the iPad delivers for me.

    I wonder if this is similar to the way people in music and education felt in the early days of Mac vs PC, when Apple had the best experience and best apps for certain industries? These days I could never go Mac because it does a very tiny fraction of what I do on the PC. Not the case for the more limited tablet world.
  • 3 Hide
    acku , July 8, 2011 3:25 PM
    winterbladeHello guys. A few months ago I really thought tablets were just a gimmick and that, iOS or Android, I would never get one, then I noticed that more and more frequently I rather use my Motoroi (the mexican version of the original Droid) than my laptop (a Dell Studio XPS 13) for simple tasks like chat, light browsing, checking mail and hell even for gaming I found myself using more and more my phone, but I really get tired soon because of the small display... so it soon became a no brainer that I wanted a tablet.I could really not say if it´s because I'm waaaaaaaaay more used to use android devices than iOS ones, but seriously, iPad being more intuitive than the Xoom my ass... I love the Android buttons in my phone and I love the software buttons in my Xoom. Of course iPad is going to be more intuitive if you are an iPhone user, is the same frikkin OS. I'm a PC user and as such I can tell you I feel at home with android from day one, iOS and OS X, even when pretty at first sight, are just not enough functional for me and I really find no value in that famous "apple experience" and since mankind is yet to design a experience-o-metter it is my humble opinion that in an OBJECTIVE review it should not be regarded over and over again, maybe in an editorial, but not in a review.About people saying they rather get a netbook or even a notebook instead a tablet (I was one of those not long ago) The only thing I can say is that if some one manage to make a 1.5 pound netbook with the 8-9 hours of constant use I can get from my Xoom I will agree with you then, but not today, tablets do have advantages over traditional systems.


    I honestly can't speak from iPhone experience. Other TH coworkers have iPhones, but I don't. I actually have an Android phone, one that I purchased prior to any tablet use.

    Some of what I'm speaking from comes from my experience as an Android and iOS developer. Most of my comments on usability are simply issues with UI. As I stated in the review, the iPad is more analogous to the Wii, whereas Xoom feels more like a PS3. It's really a different experience.

    Quote:
    Good article.

    I'm an android phone owner and an ipad owner, and am slowly being converted to iOS for mobile simply because of the vast amount of applications I use that aren't even similarly available on the Android OS. This is painful for me because I'm a Windows programmer and I despise Apple, assemble my own PCs, etc. I'm pretty typical there I guess. But in the end, I just want something that does what I want (music and language apps, mostly), and when it comes to tablet software, only the iPad delivers for me.

    I wonder if this is similar to the way people in music and education felt in the early days of Mac vs PC, when Apple had the best experience and best apps for certain industries? These days I could never go Mac because it does a very tiny fraction of what I do on the PC. Not the case for the more limited tablet world.



    Thanks for the kudos. As a programmer, you probably understand the problem of third-party app support in a way most people don't.

    On the second sentiment, I'm really not sure how this is going to play out. There are too many variables. So much of this has to do wtih product vision. Apple didn't help itself when it booted out Jobs back in the early days. The Android CTO Steve Horowitz left for Coupons a while back, but there are many talented people at the helm at Google. We probably need another year or two before the fog on the battlefield clears.
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