Skip to main content

Retesting The MSI MPG X570 Plus Motherboard

Concerns about using Prime95 small-FFTs are addressed through the addition of Cinebench and Blender. The hottest default test for Blender 2.82 was its “pavillon_barcelona” scene producing the greatest amount of heat, so we downloaded the CLI (command-line interface) version under the organization’s “other platforms” dropdown and wrote a batch file to repeat the test eleven times. Meanwhile, Cinebench allowed us to simply set a minimum runtime and repeated the test until the runtime had lapsed.

Image 1 of 3

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 3

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 3

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Cinebench warms up faster, but to a slightly lower temperature than the other two tests. Perhaps if the benchmark length were a bit longer—requiring fewer cycles to complete this one-hour test—it might even have been the best metric. But, it’s close enough to the other power tests that we wouldn’t call anyone out for using it in this configuration.

Retesting At 40% PWM

Concerns that our fans might be performing beyond those of the typical system are easily addressed by dropping PWM cycles to 40%. The ~ 945 RPM result should be slow enough to represent a wider range of systems with front-mounted dual-fan radiators.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The worst reading of 102 degrees at 40% fans in Prime95 small-FFTs also happens to be the point at which the motherboard was supposed to have throttled the CPU, had we not configured it to a higher throttle point. If any of us owned this 3900X machine, we’d start looking for ways to get more airflow (such as fans that spin faster than 945 RPM).

Retesting In A Closed Build

The Phantom 410 is designed to support a 2x140mm radiator internally with two intake fans between the frame and top cover, but we flipped that arrangement with our 2x120mm unit to match traditional orientation: Both fans are under the radiator, blowing upward. We even tossed a pair of 3.5-inch drives in the lower bay to keep the build as realistic as possible.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

We’ll speed this part up since you’re probably getting tired of redundant data: Putting the MPG X570 Gaming Plus into a top-radiator case resulted in dramatically lower temperatures compared to our front-cooled test platform. But, what about overclocking?

MORE: Best Motherboards

MORE: How To Choose A Motherboard

MORE: All Motherboard Content

  • refillable
    ASUS TUF Gaming or Prime-P X570 deserves the editor's choice, not this one.
    Reply
  • Lutfij
    Where do you see mention of the board in the review(linked above) being awarded an Editor's Choice?
    Reply
  • refillable
    I'm pretty sure you have been following the whole story.
    Reply
  • Crashman
    refillable said:
    ASUS TUF Gaming or Prime-P X570 deserves the editor's choice, not this one.
    I wish we had tested it. The board Asus sent was priced significantly higher, and even the non-WiFi version of the board Asus sent was $15 more costly at the time of the review.

    But the later board dropped $10 after the original review, so the original review's value assessment is a snapshot of bargain pricing for that specific time.
    Reply
  • refillable
    Crashman said:
    I wish we had tested it. The board Asus sent was priced significantly higher, and even the non-WiFi version of the board Asus sent was $15 more costly at the time of the review.

    But the later board dropped $10 after the original review, so the original review's value assessment is a snapshot of bargain pricing for that specific time.

    I see. I am really glad you decided to re-test this and removed the editor choice award for an obviously inferior board.
    Reply
  • Crashman
    refillable said:
    I see. I am really glad you decided to re-test this and removed the editor choice award for an obviously inferior board.
    The data presented here shows that the original data was correct. The new problem for the board is that it is no longer price competitive.
    Reply
  • refillable
    Crashman said:
    The data presented here shows that the original data was correct. The new problem for the board is that it is no longer price competitive.
    It was correct, but it was incomplete. I feel like it takes a Ryzen 9 to show how inferior the board is to a slightly more expensive board. Now you have the full picture and different conclusions and I appreciate that (regardless of the price drop).
    Reply
  • Crashman
    refillable said:
    It was correct, but it was incomplete. I feel like it takes a Ryzen 9 to show how inferior the board is to a slightly more expensive board. Now you have the full picture and different conclusions and I appreciate that (regardless of the price drop).
    The Ryzen 9 heat estimates from the original article were shown accurate in the first chart of this article. We understand that some users would prefer to see a worst case scenario rather than a typical case, but also realize that most people building a PC have read enough to understand the basics of system cooling.

    All of that is water under the bridge concerning the award, since competing boards are now cheap enough to knock this one out of contention.
    Reply