3DMark Is Now Also A Stress-Test Tool

3DMark isn’t just a benchmark anymore. The Futuremark software received an update that adds stress-testing modules to Advanced and Professional editions of 3DMark that enable users to check the stability of their system.

The update has four tiers of stress tests based on the Sky Diver and Fire Strike (all three versions) benchmarks, offering different levels of performance to load the system. Each test runs in a loop without pausing to reload the scene. In 3DMark Advanced, the stress test scene runs twenty times, and its duration cannot be modified. However, in the Professional edition, users can set any number of loops (between two and 5,000) to stress their rig for extended periods (or less) of time.

When the stress test completes, it produces a framerate stability score. A high score indicates that your PC’s performance is stable under load. However, a failed test result occurs if your system can’t produce at least a 97-percent framerate stability score in all of its loops. This is an excellent way to see if your components are throttling due to an unstable overclock or inadequate cooling with a UI many enthusiasts are accustomed to.

You can download 3DMark at Futuremark’s website, and Steam users will see the program update automatically.

Derek Forrest is an Associate Contributing Writer for Tom’s Hardware and Tom’s IT Pro. Follow Derek Forrest on Twitter. Follow us on Facebook, Google+, RSS, Twitter and YouTube.

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  • apache_lives
    Nothing beats Furmark yet, curious how this compares.
  • takeshi7
    Does it actually detect errors in the calculations like Prime95, or does it go entirely based on framerate consistency?

    Seems kind of useless if it only does the latter.
  • Memhorder
    Think i might give this a whirl.

    This would be a good test for overall system stability. Unlike Prime95 which would be just CPU. I do think it is contingent on frame rate consistency