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AMD Ryzen 4000 Laptops Listed With March 16 Release Date

(Image credit: Amazon China)

Update 3/10/2020: Since we've published this article we've spotted AMD Ryzen 4000 laptops from Asus on Newegg Canada as well. They're listed with a release date of March 16. 

Original article:

AMD announced its new Ryzen 4000 H-Series high-performance laptop CPUs in January, and ever since it's been a waiting game for devices sporting them. But the wait is over -- at least in China. Spotted by hardware leaker @Momomo_US, Amazon China has now listed three Asus gaming laptops with the new chips.

These notebooks are the Asus ROG Zephyrus G14 GA401II, ROG Zephyrus G14 GA401IU and TUF FA706IU. The Zephyrus models are listed as packing the new AMD Ryzen 7 4800HS, and the TUF laptop is specced with an AMD Ryzen 7 4800H.

(Image credit: Amazon China)

AMD Ryzen 4000 Laptop Specs

Asus G14 GA401IIAsus G14 GA401IUAsus TUF FA706IU
CPUAMD Ryzen 7 4800HSAMD Ryzen 7 4800HSAMD Ryzen 7 4800H
Memory16GB DDR416GB DDR416GB DDR4
GPUGTX 1650 Ti (6GB)GTX 1660 Ti (6GB)GTX 1660 Ti (6GB)
SSD512GB NVMe512GB NVMe1TB NVMe
Price¥9,999 ($1,437)¥11,602 ($1,668)¥10,359 ($1,489)

The specifications for the AMD Ryzen 7 4800H are freely available. The APU packs eight cores and 16 threads, has a base clock of 2.9 GHz and a max boost clock of up to 4.2 GHz on its best cores. It comes with a default TDP of 45W and seven GPU cores to save power during times when a system's dedicated graphics card isn't needed.

(Image credit: AMD)

Contrastingly, AMD has not officially announced the Ryzen 7 4800HS chip yet, so there is no product page for it on AMD's website yet nor did the Amazon pages reveal any details. 

We have previously suspected that the Ryzen 7 4800HS is a more power-efficient chip than the 4800H, and others too expect it to be a more efficient chip with a 35W TDP. This wouldn't come as a surprise, given the slimmer form factor of the Zephyrus notebooks over the TUF laptop.

Either way, it's exciting to see the new Ryzen 4000 series mobile chips landing, and we're curious to see how they'll perform compared to the blue team's competition.

  • rgd1101
    Is there one that don't come with dgpu?
    Reply
  • Umfriend
    I would so much love one just running off of the iGPU. Imagine what one could do with the real-estate vacated by the dGPU and surely it would save a bit on power usage.
    Reply
  • WolfGang1317
    rgd1101 said:
    Is there one that don't come with dgpu?
    Based on what was said at CES, there are some ultrabooks in the making, but they might be using Vega graphics from the previous gen as opposed to the newer Navi architecture
    Reply
  • rgd1101
    WolfGang1317 said:
    Based on what was said at CES, there are some ultrabooks in the making, but they might be using Vega graphics from the previous gen as opposed to the newer Navi architecture
    with the "H" and not the "U"?
    yes, know about vega gpu. I think I read it a vega++
    Reply
  • redgarl
    WolfGang1317 said:
    Based on what was said at CES, there are some ultrabooks in the making, but they might be using Vega graphics from the previous gen as opposed to the newer Navi architecture

    WTH are you talking about, the Ryzen 4000 mobile are using Vega cores optimized. There is no Navi cores with these CPUs.
    Reply
  • alextheblue
    Umfriend said:
    Imagine what one could do with the real-estate vacated by the dGPU
    Such as? A slimmer model without a dGPU would be FAR better served by a 4800U, which has a bigger graphics block clocked higher. In particular, one coupled with LPDDR4 @ 4266 would be ideal.
    Umfriend said:
    surely it would save a bit on power usage.
    It would likely only save power when gaming, and that's when you want 3D performance the most anyway. Again, a 4800U is what you want inside of a iGPU-only laptop. It WOULD be nice if someone offered it in a 25W TDP-up config, but I suspect most OEMs will configure for 15W.
    Reply
  • Umfriend
    alextheblue said:
    Such as? A slimmer model without a dGPU would be FAR better served by a 4800U, which has a bigger graphics block clocked higher. In particular, one coupled with LPDDR4 @ 4266 would be ideal.

    It would likely only save power when gaming, and that's when you want 3D performance the most anyway. Again, a 4800U is what you want inside of a iGPU-only laptop. It WOULD be nice if someone offered it in a 25W TDP-up config, but I suspect most OEMs will configure for 15W.
    Well, the real-estate could be used for SSDs, better/quieter cooling (imagine 2 fans working in tandem to cool just the CPU and they could be a bit thicker), 4 DIMM slots instead of 2?

    I would think (but found no figures showing anything on dGPU idle power consumption) that a dGPU, even at idle, consumes quite a bit of power and savings on dGPU+Memory allow for other parts being better within the same budget.

    Yes, the 4800U does seem a very nice chip and could rock with TDP-up of 25W to increase the base frequency. But I am not into GPU-oriented performance. For me, CPU and I/O is what matters. I would rather have Vega-5 or Vega-3 coupled with high-thread @ high frequency cores.
    Reply
  • alextheblue
    Umfriend said:
    Well, the real-estate could be used for SSDs, better/quieter cooling (imagine 2 fans working in tandem to cool just the CPU and they could be a bit thicker), 4 DIMM slots instead of 2?

    I would think (but found no figures showing anything on dGPU idle power consumption) that a dGPU, even at idle, consumes quite a bit of power and savings on dGPU+Memory allow for other parts being better within the same budget.
    I don't think you'll find much in the way of fancy cooling setups in anything that doesn't have a dGPU. Laptops without dedicated graphics use just enough cooling to get the job done. When a system doesn't even include the option for a dGPU, they shrink the entire unit, so there isn't any extra space to start with. When a dGPU is available but OPTIONAL, the space is largely wasted since they otherwise utilize the same CPU cooling and mainboard. They're not going to produce two custom mainboards for the same chassis/CPU combo, especially when the features they would be adding would be incredibly niche.

    The exception would be the option for an extra SSD. That is a nice idea. However, since they're using the same board, I find it likely it would be SATA. Which would be OK for a secondary drive, if any OEMs bothered.
    Umfriend said:
    Yes, the 4800U does seem a very nice chip and could rock with TDP-up of 25W to increase the base frequency. But I am not into GPU-oriented performance. For me, CPU and I/O is what matters. I would rather have Vega-5 or Vega-3 coupled with high-thread @ high frequency cores.
    I see. Personally I'd rather have the extra graphics punch, since so many things are accelerated by the GPU now. For example, you can save a LOT of power by offloading to the GPU when decoding 4K HEVC. Plus it opens up the option for casual gaming in a pinch. But who knows... maybe someone will stick an H/HS model in a system without a dGPU. I kind of doubt it, I think that's even less likely than an up-TDP 4800U.
    Reply