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AMD Ryzen 4000 Pro APUs Pricing Leak: 8-Core Zen 2 APU Listed Around $300

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Twitter user @Hifihedgehog has exposed the purported pricing for AMD's Ryzen Pro 4000-series (codename Renoir) APUs, which are reportedly taken from established distributor Ingram Micro. 

It's important to bear in mind that the distributor's pricing is for its clients and will likely vary from AMD's official MSRP for the general public. Furthermore, the Ryzen 7 Pro 4750G, Ryzen 5 Pro 4650G and Ryzen 3 Pro 4350G are Pro models, meaning they cost a bit more than standard models because of their added security features and support. Either way, the non-Pro models, such as the rumored Ryzen 7 4700G, Ryzen 5 4400G and Ryzen 3 4200G, should come with more friendly price tags.

ProcesorOPNCores / ThreadsBoost Clock (GHz)Cache (MB)TDP (W)Pricing
Ryzen 7 Pro 4750G100-0000001458 / 164.41265$302.02
Ryzen 5 Pro 4650G100-0000001436 / 124.31165$204.40
Ryzen 3 Pro 4350G100-0000001484 / 84.1665$141.41

Ingram Micro posted the Ryzen 7 Pro 4750G and Ryzen 5 Pro 4650G for $302.02 and $204.40, respectively. The entry-level Ryzen 3 Pro 4350G is listed at $141.41. As the Twitter user noted, Ingram Micro sells the Ryzen 7 3700X for $312.12. The octa-core chip debuted with a $329 MSRP. That's a $16.88 difference. If we take that value as a reference, then the Ryzen 7 Pro 4750G, Ryzen 5 Pro 4650G and Ryzen 3 Pro 4350G could end up selling for $318.96, $221.28 and $158.29, respectively.

The Ryzen 7 Pro 3700X is available on Ingram Micro for $352.53, which costs $40.41 more than the Ryzen 7 3700X. We're not saying that the non-Pro models will cost $40 less than the Pro variants, but the pricing delta shows that we can expect them to be cheaper.

Dutch retailer Centralpoint's postings suggest that AMD may unleash the Ryzen 4000-series desktop APUs this month, and Ingram Micro's recent product pages seemingly lend some credence to the rumor.

  • FinnSoft
    Can we clarify, please? Ingram Micro is a distributor, not a retailer. They don't sell to end-users, or if they now DO, I need to update my knowledge. I discarded them as a supplier more than 20 years ago.
    Reply
  • Blas
    "...the Ryzen 7 3700X for $312.12. The octa-core chip debuted with a $329 MSRP. That's roughly a $16.88 difference. "

    Roughly...
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    $300 for 8/16 cores is not surprising if you think about it. The iGPU takes a lot of space. This is also a monolithic die. And a Ryzen 3700 x is like $280. (And the later would be cheaper because mcm's are cheaper to produce over a monolithic die.)

    I don't think there will be much of a market for this however. I think 6/12 core is the most people will be willing to invest in an APU because you can buy a $100 card and get significantly faster performance.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    digitalgriffin said:
    I don't think there will be much of a market for this however. I think 6/12 core is the most people will be willing to invest in an APU because you can buy a $100 card and get significantly faster performance.
    I'd imagine the main market for 8c16t with IGP is office PCs where the cores may be needed for zippy responsiveness across the entire seat's sofwate suite and graphics are mostly-don't-care. May also be useful for home/low-end servers where you may need the cores for processing power and want an IGP for compact size and low power.

    There is no shortage of uses for a reasonably priced 8c16t APU if you expand your horizon beyond the DIY desktop market.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    InvalidError said:
    I'd imagine the main market for 8c16t with IGP is office PCs where the cores may be needed for zippy responsiveness across the entire seat's sofwate suite and graphics are mostly-don't-care. May also be useful for home/low-end servers where you may need the cores for processing power and want an IGP for compact size and low power.

    There is no shortage of uses for a reasonably priced 8c16t APU if you expand your horizon beyond the DIY desktop market.

    I would say you are right about office computers and laptops. But AMD has sadly had problems making inroads here.

    As to small form factor pc's well thats another good idea. But 4/8 threads is good enough for router boxes or nas storage for a small office up to 20 people. And if you want to stream with plex to multiple people, you should intel quick sync.

    Im hoping for AMD. Maybe the 8 core would be good for student school laptops in the $750-$900 range. AMD seems to be making inroads here at least.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    digitalgriffin said:
    As to small form factor pc's well thats another good idea. But 4/8 threads is good enough for router boxes or nas storage for a small office up to 20 people.
    Some people run things like Minecraft servers. If I had a Ryzen 4750G NUC, I would probably end up using it to replace my living room PC and make it do double-duty as a development box that I can SSH into.

    Once you open the home server can of worms, there is an infinite number of extra possibilities.
    Reply
  • dyils
    digitalgriffin said:
    I would say you are right about office computers and laptops. But AMD has sadly had problems making inroads here.

    As to small form factor pc's well thats another good idea. But 4/8 threads is good enough for router boxes or nas storage for a small office up to 20 people. And if you want to stream with plex to multiple people, you should intel quick sync.

    Im hoping for AMD. Maybe the 8 core would be good for student school laptops in the $750-$900 range. AMD seems to be making inroads here at least.

    There are plenty of things that don't require strong graphics. Personally, I'm gonna use it for both of the below.
    Developer PC - Why pay for a GPU if I'm compiling code all day? All I need is a good CPU and SSD
    Streaming PC for gamers (in dual PC setups) - currently the 2700x and 3700x are excellent streaming CPUs except you still need a GPU. With this, you won't even need that for encoding streams.
    Reply
  • jeremyj_83
    InvalidError said:
    I'd imagine the main market for 8c16t with IGP is office PCs where the cores may be needed for zippy responsiveness across the entire seat's sofwate suite and graphics are mostly-don't-care. May also be useful for home/low-end servers where you may need the cores for processing power and want an IGP for compact size and low power.

    There is no shortage of uses for a reasonably priced 8c16t APU if you expand your horizon beyond the DIY desktop market.
    Also nice for developers who run Virtual Box or Hyper-V VMs on their desktop for testing.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    Either way, the non-Pro models, such as the rumored Ryzen 7 4700G, Ryzen 5 Pro 4400G and Ryzen 3 Pro 4200G, should come with more friendly price tags.
    If those are non-Pro models, then why would AMD include "Pro" in two of their names? : 3
    Reply
  • Chung Leong
    digitalgriffin said:
    I don't think there will be much of a market for this however. I think 6/12 core is the most people will be willing to invest in an APU because you can buy a $100 card and get significantly faster performance.

    An extra component is an extra failure point. Video cards do have a nasty tendency to fail after only a few years of use. Where longevity matters, integrated graphics is a better choice. You would also want as much performance as you can afford, so the machine is more capable of running software of tomorrow.
    Reply