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AMD's Vega Graphics Coming To Gaming Laptops, Ryzen 7 2800H And Ryzen 5 2600H Listed

AMD listed the Ryzen 7 2800H and the Ryzen 5 2600H on its website. These new processors bring the inherent goodness of the Raven Ridge architecture, found in the Ryzen 5 2400G and the Ryzen 3 2200G, to gaming notebooks. As such, these processors come with AMD's Zen compute cores paired with the Vega graphics architecture, and they are also AMD's first processors to support DDR4-3200 as a base specification.

Both new models feature a similar design as their desktop counterparts, albeit with slightly redesigned in frequencies to adjust for the flimsy cooling in mobile form factors and battery life limitations. That's reflected in the processors' reduced 45W TDP (thermal design power), which is much lower than the 65W TDP found on the desktop parts. AMD does give vendors some wiggle room with a configurable TDP (cTDP) range that spans between 35W and 45W.

The move to support for DDR4-3200 is an encouraging sign, as we've shown how readily the Raven Ridge parts respond to improved memory performance. Pair that with Vega's higher clock speeds and these should be pretty powerful chips for the gaming laptop segment.

Ryzen 7 2800HRyzen 7 2700URyzen 5 2600HRyzen 5 2500UAthlon 200GERyzen 3 2200GRyzen 5 2400G
TDP45W (35-54W cTDP)15W (12-25 cTDP)45W (35-54W cTDP)15W (12 -25 cTDP)35W65W65W
ArchitectureZenZenZenZenZenZenZen
Process14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm
Cores / Threads4 / 84 / 84 / 84 / 82 / 44 / 44 / 8
Frequency Base / Boost (GHz)3.3 / 3.82.2 / 3.83.2 / 3.62.0 / 3.63.2 / -3.5 / 3.73.6 / 3.9
Memory SpeedDDR4-3200DDR4-2933DDR4-3200DDR4-2933DDR4-2677DDR4-2933DDR4-2933
Memory ControllerDual-ChannelDual-ChannelDual-ChannelDual-ChannelDual-ChannelDual-ChannelDual-Channel
Cache (L3)4MB4MB4MB4MB4MB4MB4MB
Integrated GraphicsRadeon Vega 11 (11 CU) 1,300 MHzRadeon Vega 10 (10CU)Radeon Vega 8 (8 CU) 1,100 MHzRadeon Vega 8 (8CU)Radeon Vega 3 (3 CU)Radeon Vega 8 (8 CU) 1,250 MHzRadeon Vega 11 (11 CU) 1,100 MHz
Unlocked MultiplierYesYesYesYesNoYesYes
MSRP????$55$99$160

The Ryzen 7 2800H is analogous to the0 2700U and 2400G, but it comes with a 3.3 GHz base and 3.8 GHz boost clocks. The four-core, eight-thread CPU is complemented by Vega graphics with 11 CU (Compute Unit) clocked up to a max of 1,300 MHz, which is a nice boost over its desktop counterpart.

The Ryzen 5 2600H is similar to the 5 2500U and 2200G, but it's four cores are hyper-threaded, which is a big bonus. The Vega graphics come with 8 CUs and boost up to 1,100 MHz.

As a side note, we've already seen the Ryzen 7 2800H listed by HP in its All-In-One computers, and AMD also recently touted its improved power efficiency, though our colleague Ian Cutress over at AnandTech has pointed out that AMD's power efficiency measurement methodology could use a second look.

AMD lists the processors as available on September 10, but there hasn't been an official announcement yet, so pricing remains unknown. These processors will land at OEM and ODM customers, so pricing will likely depend upon volume.

  • Aldain
    Just buy it...
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    21327877 said:
    Just buy it...


    You might have to once people start price gouging intel laptops due to the shortage.
    Reply
  • newsonline5000000
    Stupid 11 cu ...

    AMD stop hiding your 22 CU SOC
    Reply
  • redgarl
    Finally, I might consider one. Price should be interesting.

    RIP Nvidia 1030/1050 mobile.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    21327924 said:
    Stupid 11 cu ...

    AMD stop hiding your 22 CU SOC

    You never used a 2400G obviously.

    Reply
  • alextheblue
    21327877 said:
    Just buy it...
    At least save it for an Nvidia post. In all seriousness, I understand your frustration 100%. I don't like the situation, even though it was just an opinion piece by one author. But from one random dude to another, let me toss this out there: Chill for a while. Wait until after the RTX full review is out, and see if they are fair.
    Reply
  • alextheblue
    21327924 said:
    Stupid 11 cu ...

    AMD stop hiding your 22 CU SOC
    Yeah, cause they're totally just sitting on a big fat Zen APU. They burned engineering money and now they won't fab it. :P
    Personally I'd like to see a couple gaming lappys with a 2600H/2800H and discrete graphics. Not high-end, but something to compete in the $1000 and under range and undercut Intel-powered counterparts a bit.

    AMD does give vendors some wiggle room with a configurable TDP (cTDP) range that spans between 35W and 45W.
    You mean 54W? Or is the table wrong?
    Reply