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Asus Reportedly Working On AMD X590 and X599 Motherboards

(Image credit: Asus)

Anonymous sources inside Asus headquarters have reportedly confirmed to VideoCardz the existence of AMD X590 and X599 motherboards.

Before AMD released the X570 chipset, there were mumblings that the chipmaker would release it in two flavors. The rumors pointed to an 11W variant for consumer motherboards and a 15W variant for high-performance motherboards. References to the X570 and X590 chipsets inside Gigabyte's BIOS files have lent credence to this rumor.

The X570 chipset is most likely the consumer offering making the X590 chipset the higher-end part. Besides the obvious difference in power draw, the X590 chipset could come with more PCIe 4.0 lanes. If we had to take a wild guess, we would bet on four more PCIe 4.0 lanes. One of the caveats with X590 that we can think of would be cooling. A higher power draw would mean a more aggressive fan curve to keep the chipset cool.

Asus' confidential documents mention the Prime X590-Pro and ROG Strix X590-E motherboards. VideoCardz noted that the motherboards are probably in the development stage and may or may not make it to the market. There's a good chance that motherboard manufacturers are preparing their X590 motherboards for the Ryzen 9 3950X launch in September.

In other news, VideoCardz also claims to have also discovered Asus's plan to release the successor to the ROG Zenith Extreme motherboard, which is based on the current X399 chipset. The ROG Zenith II Extreme, as it is allegedly called, could feature the brand new X599 chipset to house AMD's forthcoming Ryzen Threadripper 3000-series HEDT (high-end desktop) processors. Unfortunately, we still don't have a concrete launch date for the core-heavy chips except that they are slated to come out before the end of the year.

  • jimmysmitty
    So $800 for a X570 wasn't enough for mainstream. Guess we will see our first $1K mainstream motherboard soon.
    Reply
  • bill@micros0ft
    Hi JimmySmitty,
    I see X570 boards here in europe for sub 200 EUR incl. 21% VAT? Doesn't mean because there are 800 USD boards that you need to buy one. Most of the time they contain lots of features that a great many people don't need or never use anyway. Granted, X590/X599 boards will likely be more expensive than X570 for comparably equipped counterparts. Doesn't mean you need such an expensive board... Personally, I'd only pay that for a very high end server or workstation dual cpu socket (or up) board.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    bill@micros0ft said:
    Hi JimmySmitty,
    I see X570 boards here in europe for sub 200 EUR incl. 21% VAT? Doesn't mean because there are 800 USD boards that you need to buy one. Most of the time they contain lots of features that a great many people don't need or never use anyway. Granted, X590/X599 boards will likely be more expensive than X570 for comparably equipped counterparts. Doesn't mean you need such an expensive board... Personally, I'd only pay that for a very high end server or workstation dual cpu socket (or up) board.

    Thats kind of my point. Vendors pushing a $800 dollar board into the mainstream is ridiculous and with a "higher end" chipset they will just have a reason to charge near $1000. If people buy it then it will show they can slowly up pricing in mainstream.
    Reply
  • svan71
    If some manufactuer wants to make a 1K board and some people want to buy it what exactly is the problem? There are Corvettes and there are Chevettes, nobody is doing anything wrong and nobody said anything about forcing you to buy it. There are Rzen 3950's and Ryzen 2200G nobody is complaining.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    svan71 said:
    If some manufactuer wants to make a 1K board and some people want to buy it what exactly is the problem? There are Corvettes and there are Chevettes, nobody is doing anything wrong and nobody said anything about forcing you to buy it. There are Rzen 3950's and Ryzen 2200G nobody is complaining.

    The only problem I have is it will eventually raise the bottom end pricing. $1K has its place, in HEDT and multi CPU systems. But mainstream should never have products that match HEDT pricing.

    Who in their right mind would pay $1K for a mainstream board when they could get a HEDT product for that or less with a better CPU, more memory channels and most of the same features.

    I have no problem with $1K. I just think its not the place for mainstream to be so expensive.
    Reply
  • nathanmmnm
    Sure some people want the max of everything (max cpu performance, max number of PCIE lanes, lots of internal and external expansion potential etc etc), however, this misses the point that most people don't use all the features they have i.e. if you play games you probably don't need the same IO as a content creation based user while you can both benefit from raw power.

    The issue with focusing on features is that people end up being sold something they wont use and at a high price, which in turn means less money spent on other hardware (instead of dropping $1k on a mainboard you could drop $250 and then spend $750 on an awesome monitor upgrade or VR or whatever).

    I am bias here as I have been holding off upgrading for years, my i7 920 has been clocked at 4GHz for many years and is only now appearing underpowered, a 16 core Ryzen 3000 would be a phenomenal upgrade although I can only realistically get around a factor of two in memory bandwidth unless I wait for threadripper 3. Personally I want raw power more than "features" (I play games but multiple instances of the same game at the same time).

    Other than "people with money to burn" who are these $1k boards aimed at?
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    nathanmmnm said:
    Sure some people want the max of everything (max cpu performance, max number of PCIE lanes, lots of internal and external expansion potential etc etc), however, this misses the point that most people don't use all the features they have i.e. if you play games you probably don't need the same IO as a content creation based user while you can both benefit from raw power.

    The issue with focusing on features is that people end up being sold something they wont use and at a high price, which in turn means less money spent on other hardware (instead of dropping $1k on a mainboard you could drop $250 and then spend $750 on an awesome monitor upgrade or VR or whatever).

    I am bias here as I have been holding off upgrading for years, my i7 920 has been clocked at 4GHz for many years and is only now appearing underpowered, a 16 core Ryzen 3000 would be a phenomenal upgrade although I can only realistically get around a factor of two in memory bandwidth unless I wait for threadripper 3. Personally I want raw power more than "features" (I play games but multiple instances of the same game at the same time).

    Other than "people with money to burn" who are these $1k boards aimed at?

    Just money to burn people.

    And if you want more memory bandwidth you would have to go HEDT. Mainstream memory bandwidth is not yet double what Nehalem HEDT was.
    Reply