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Stress Level Zero Previews 'Hover Junkers' Co-Operative VR Gameplay

Stress Level Zero is a developer you may not be familiar with, but it has the privilege of being one of the first HTC Vive developers. The company will be releasing Hover Junkers as a launch title for HTC’s Vive VR system.

The Founder of Stress Level Zero, Brandon J Laatsch, got his start on YouTube, so as a result, the development of Hover Junkers has been well documented and shared for the world to follow. In the most recent video, the developer demonstrated what cooperative gameplay looks like in the game. While two people share the same virtual area within the game, the live view of one of the players shows that only one person is in that physical space. His teammate is playing from another location online.

The video also demonstrated what playing a first person shooter in roomscale VR will look like. The player is able to physically duck behind objects for cover and reaches his arms in the air to shoot while ducking. In a previous dev diary video, Laatsch explained that all of these actions for the cover system were a result of using roomscale tracking.

Stress Level Zero said that Hover Junkers is being prepared for launch with HTC’s Vive in April. The company said there are plans for Oculus Rift support in the future, but Touch will be required to play the game on that platform. 

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  • jasonelmore
    Looks great but they are gonna have to figure out how to make those cables wireless. He almost tripped 3-4 times during that video
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    A permanent setup would have the cables suspended from the ceiling or maybe a boom microphone stand.

    My ideal VR experience would be like that old video of Capcom's 'Deep Down' from 2014 concept.

    Imagine a suit with rumble motors all over your body that provide feedback when you're struck. mmhmm good stuff.
    Reply
  • Dan414
    I am dismayed by all the talk of roomscale VR, ducking, and reaching, I want VR so I can lay down in my bed or recliner and play a game. I hope most games come with a way to turn off head motion requirement. I have a gym membership - I go there for exercise - not to my computer.

    Am I the only one who feels this way?
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    Those graphics...
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    17358183 said:
    Looks great but they are gonna have to figure out how to make those cables wireless. He almost tripped 3-4 times during that video

    Wireless VR HMDs won't be happening any time soon, unfortunately.
    For the first generation, we're just going to have to adapt to it. The Chaperone system built into the Vive will help with this, but you are right, it will be very easy to trip over the cable if you're not careful.

    I suspect someone will come up with a way to suspend the cable above you.
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    I am dismayed by all the talk of roomscale VR, ducking, and reaching, I want VR so I can lay down in my bed or recliner and play a game. I hope most games come with a way to turn off head motion requirement. I have a gym membership - I go there for exercise - not to my computer.

    Am I the only one who feels this way?


    What you are describing is not VR. At all.
    That would be a head mounted screen, more akin to what Vuzix is selling.

    Moving around is absolutely necessary for virtual reality to function. Also the more you are able to move naturally in the experience, the more comfortable it tends to feel.
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    A permanent setup would have the cables suspended from the ceiling or maybe a boom microphone stand.

    My ideal VR experience would be like that old video of Capcom's 'Deep Down' from 2014 concept.

    Imagine a suit with rumble motors all over your body that provide feedback when you're struck. mmhmm good stuff.

    There are companies making accessories that will provide similar function to that.
    HTC is not currently working on anything like that for the Vive (at least that I know of)
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    Those graphics...


    VR games are going to be a step back in graphics in many cases.
    Standard PC games have a target framerate of 60fps, and in some cases only 30fps. VR Games will requiire at least 90fps, not average, but minimum, to avoid motion sickness.
    Combine that with higher than 1080p resolution and it's a recipe for massive graphics requirements.

    One way to make that work is the use lower quality graphics to ensure high performance.
    It likely won't be uncommon for first generation VR titles to look less impressive than a typical modern AAA game.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    I am dismayed by all the talk of roomscale VR, ducking, and reaching, I want VR so I can lay down in my bed or recliner and play a game. I hope most games come with a way to turn off head motion requirement. I have a gym membership - I go there for exercise - not to my computer.

    Am I the only one who feels this way?

    That's more or less the Rift's approach. And really, it's probably the only viable one. Not nearly enough consumers are going to have an entire spare room they can keep completely empty for gaming.

    I think VR in its entirety isn't really destined to stick around, unfortunately. The tech is awesome and can provide a very fun experience, sure, but I feel like it's going to vanish the same way and for the same reason that 3D did: People just don't want to wear stuff on their heads.
    Reply
  • Mikasa7627
    I am dismayed by all the talk of roomscale VR, ducking, and reaching, I want VR so I can lay down in my bed or recliner and play a game. I hope most games come with a way to turn off head motion requirement. I have a gym membership - I go there for exercise - not to my computer.

    Am I the only one who feels this way?

    That's more or less the Rift's approach. And really, it's probably the only viable one. Not nearly enough consumers are going to have an entire spare room they can keep completely empty for gaming.

    I think VR in its entirety isn't really destined to stick around, unfortunately. The tech is awesome and can provide a very fun experience, sure, but I feel like it's going to vanish the same way and for the same reason that 3D did: People just don't want to wear stuff on their heads.
    I am dismayed by all the talk of roomscale VR, ducking, and reaching, I want VR so I can lay down in my bed or recliner and play a game. I hope most games come with a way to turn off head motion requirement. I have a gym membership - I go there for exercise - not to my computer.

    Am I the only one who feels this way?

    That's more or less the Rift's approach. And really, it's probably the only viable one. Not nearly enough consumers are going to have an entire spare room they can keep completely empty for gaming.

    I think VR in its entirety isn't really destined to stick around, unfortunately. The tech is awesome and can provide a very fun experience, sure, but I feel like it's going to vanish the same way and for the same reason that 3D did: People just don't want to wear stuff on their heads.

    The vive can still be used in a sitting position. Thinking that it can only be used in room scale is like thinking that a Color TV can't do black and white. Additionally, it will be cheaper than the rift by about $100 so its overall a better deal
    Reply