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Water-Cooled SSDs Are A Thing Now, As EKWB Launches 750 Series Water Block

EK Water Blocks is one of the world's leading water cooling companies. The company designs all sorts of water cooling parts, including full cover GPU blocks, CPU blocks, motherboard monoblocks, memory blocks, fittings, pump tops, reservoirs and radiators. With today's launch, EK Water Blocks is now offering cooling solutions for solid state drives. More specifically, Intel's 750 series PCI-e based drive.

The EK-FC I750 SSD is a full cover water block for Intel's PCI-e based 750 series SSD, and it is designed as a direct replacement for the passive cooler that Intel supplies. EKWB has mirrored the design of the water block to match that of the passive cooler. It features the same sweeping black line across the front, and the name of the drive is printed onto the face in the same font and location as the stock cooler. The EK-FC I750 SSD block is only being offered in one version; the base is made of nickel-plated electrolytic copper, and the top is made of stainless steel to match the stock passive cooler.

The water block features the same high-flow design philosophy found in the company's GPU and CPU blocks, which makes it possible to use less powerful pumps to operate the loop. EK is also making it easy to fit into almost any loop by including two different EK-FC Terminals with the SSD block. The company noted that some builds will not allow for side-mounted ports, so a terminal with ports on the top edge is also included in the package.

EK Water Blocks said the EK-FC I750 SSD water block is available now through the company's partner reseller network and from its own webstore, the EK Webshop. EKWB has set the price for the EK-CF I750 SSD at $99.99.

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  • jaber2
    Of course if you add a big hunk of metal it would start heating up, what a fuckedup idea is this?
    Reply
  • Devoteicon
    :sarcastic:
    Reply
  • phantomferrari
    :sarcastic:

    It annoys me when you cant tell if people are just trolling you or are just that stupid
    Reply
  • thundervore
    Is this really needed?
    Reply
  • atwspoon
    Is this really needed?
    Yeah what kind of heat does the ssd put off? I was under the impression ssd tech is much more heat efficient than mechanical hard drives.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    What's next? Water-cooling DVD drives? Or how about headphones? We need water-cooled headphones. Because the fans on mine just aren't cutting it.
    Reply
  • Rheotome
    16771199 said:
    Of course if you add a big hunk of metal it would start heating up, what a fuckedup idea is this?

    Yes, it would start heating up, what is the problem with that ?
    Reply
  • wkwilley2
    What's next? Water-cooling DVD drives? Or how about headphones? We need water-cooled headphones. Because the fans on mine just aren't cutting it.

    That's a great idea. My ears always get so sweaty.
    Reply
  • durahl
    Lets clear up some misunderstanding for those confused about the need of such a Cooler.
    You don't invest into a water cooled System because of this SSD Water Cooler.
    You invest into this SSD Water Cooler because of the water cooled System.

    If you're like me ( http://i.imgur.com/3bck03l.jpg ) then chances are that, despite having a whole lot of ventilation in general, you're still lacking it at this piece of hardware intended location as the airflow is optimized somewhere else.

    This is where this tech comes into play.
    It's not for those that have plenty airflow.
    It's for those that don't have it.
    Reply
  • photonboy
    PCIe SSD's produce a lot of heat.

    However, while I get the argument above about limited space so may need water-cooling to help, I would think anybody who would buy this would know how to have sufficient air flow for this product.

    Yes, it produces more heat than a regular SATA SSD, but NO I don't think it's likely too hard to cool on air with a modicum of air flow.

    With liquid cooling you'd likely already have the CPU cooled and dumping that heat outside the case, not to mention how small can the case be when using a PCIe SSD means you likely aren't using a mini-ITX setup anyway?
    Reply