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Low-Profile LGA1700 Cooler Tames Mighty Core i9-12900K

Jonsbo
(Image credit: Jonsbo)

Jonsbo may not be a household name in the world of coolers, but the company has just introduced what could be the highest-performing low-profile solution for Intel's 12th generation Alder Lake processors. The device is designed for small form-factor (SFF) PCs and can dissipate up to 140W of power, which is enough to handle Intel's Core i9-12900K. 

Jonsbo's miniature HP400S cooler is just 36 mm high (as discovered by TechPowerUp), yet it has 40 thin aluminum fins, four 6-mm heat pipes, and a 90-mm PWM fan that spins at 800 ~ 3000 RPM ± 10% to generate an airflow of up to 48.3 CFM and wind pressure of up to 3.24mm H2O. Fan noise can reach up to 33 dBA, which may not be the most comfortable level for an SFF desktop. However, due to high airflow, this cooler can cool down CPUs with an up to 140W TDP/PBP (processor base power). 

(Image credit: Jonsbo)

The design of the HP400S from Jonsbo is tailored to offer the maximum performance possible in such a small form factor. For example, Noctua's low-profile NH-L9i-17xx (which is 37 mm tall) only has two heat pipes, a fan that spins at up to 2500 RPM and generates airflow of up to 33.9 CFM. Noctua typically does not publish TDP/PBP ratings, but the NH-L9i-17xx has an NSPR rating of 59, indicating entry-level performance

(Image credit: Jonsbo)

While a 140W rating does not guarantee that the Core i9-12900K will operate at its turbo clocks for a long time (i.e., it will not offer the same performance as higher-performance coolers), it should not overheat even in a very compact PC. 

Low-profile PCs and low-profile coolers typically are not designed for high-performance CPUs. However, the recent trend towards miniaturization calls for hardware developers to develop components that accommodate flagship CPUs in tiny mini-ITX or mini-STX chassis. 

(Image credit: Jonsbo)

In addition to LGA1700 CPUs, Jonsbo's HP400S is compatible with AMD's processors in AM4 packaging as well as Intel's CPUs in LGA115x and LGA1200 form-factors. The pricing of the cooler is currently unknown. 

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • tennis2
    Get one in for testing!

    Noctua L9i
    ID-Cooling IS-40X / IS-47X / IS-30
    Thermalright AXP-90R
    Cryorig C7
    Reply
  • mdd1963
    So all it really takes these days to earn a 'good enough for the 12900K' summary is, apparently, hang a 'up to 140 W TDP' banner on the box...?

    Watch out, Nocuta!

    (And now the heat dissipation of the very best air coolers in the world can be crammed into a single stack about the size of a pack of cigarettes, ande smaller than a quarter of the size of the previous air cooling icons...; fascinating.)
    Reply
  • Mr5oh
    mdd1963 said:
    So all it really takes these days to earn a 'good enough for the 12900K' summary is, apparently, hang a 'up to 140 W TDP' banner on the box...?

    Kind of what I was thinking. As someone who is running a 12900k and a NH-D15, I'm a bit skeptical..... I think I'll wait for some independent reviews.
    Reply
  • vern72
    140W of cooling? I just wanna know what the retaining clips for an AM4 socket would look like (as long as can use the hooks that are usually found with AM4 motherboards).
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Would be interesting to see how it would compete against a compact liquid cooler, such as the Corsair H80 series.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    TDP ratings for coolers need to be taken with a pail of salt. I’ve tested a few of these low profile coolers and never found them to be truthful, or live up to what they advertised. This one looks exactly like an ID-Cooling cooler, just with a different fan slapped on it.
    Reply
  • Soaptrail
    watzupken said:
    TDP ratings for coolers need to be taken with a pail of salt. I’ve tested a few of these low profile coolers and never found them to be truthful, or live up to what they advertised. This one looks exactly like an ID-Cooling cooler, just with a different fan slapped on it.

    Agreed, lets see testing otherwise take the marketing disguised as an article down. Did the company pay for this "article"?
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    mdd1963 said:
    So all it really takes these days to earn a 'good enough for the 12900K' summary is, apparently, hang a 'up to 140 W TDP' banner on the box...?
    If it can maintain the 12900K at base clock speeds with realistic workloads, i.e., not running Prime95, then yes.

    Some companies like to pride themselves on providing more than the bare minimum. Other companies only want to sell you the bare minimum.
    Reply
  • mdd1963
    So now merely maintaining minimal 'base clock speeds' of 3.2 GHz with with 99C temps is sufficient to earn '12900K-approved'? (Hey, it's not throttling if it maintains base clock, right?)

    That's a good one.

    LOL!

    https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/134599/intel-core-i912900k-processor-30m-cache-up-to-5-20-ghz.html

    The author can , of course, redeem himself by doing an actual test...but, it's likely this will not happen, as apparently, all we need to make CPU cooler recommendations are the manufacturer's TDP claims these days.

    Good times!
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    mdd1963 said:
    So now merely maintaining minimal 'base clock speeds' of 3.2 GHz with with 99C temps is sufficient to earn '12900K-approved'? (Hey, it's not throttling if it maintains base clock, right?)

    That's a good one.
    Technically, yes. It's still doing the base speed which is what the manufacturer guarantees as long as the cooling is sufficient, which for the sake of argument, is sufficient because 99C is still less than 100C.

    However, that does not mean I personally think it's a good idea. So don't take me pointing out still being within the operational parameters means I'm saying you should definitely go do it.
    Reply