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Overclock Away: Intel Offers Insurance for Unlocked 10th Gen Comet Lake CPUs

Intel 10th Generation Comet Lake CPUs

(Image credit: Intel)

Intel has extended the coverage of its Performance Tuning Protection Plan (PTPP) to include the the latest unlocked 10th Generation Intel Core processors hailing from the Comet Lake family.

Those who purchase a K-series processor are likely looking to overclock their Intel CPU. Intel devised the PTPP with the objective of providing enthusiasts with peace of mind during overclocking endeavors. Under the plan, Intel offers you one free replacement if you end up with a faulty or dead CPU as a result of overclocking.

Like in the past, Intel only offers the PTPP for unlocked Core i9, Core i7 and Core i5 parts. Because of the pricing, the trio of aforementioned SKUs are probably the only ones that are worth insuring. Besides, Intel didn't even announce a K-series chip for the Core i3 this generation.

Intel 10th Generation Comet Lake K-Series CPUs

ModelTray PricingCores / ThreadsBase / Boost Clock (GHz)L3 Cache (MB)TDP (W)PCIe 3.0Memory
Intel Core i9-10900K / KF$488 (K) / $472 (KF)10 / 203.7 / 5.32012516Dual DDR4-2933
Intel Core i7-10700K / KF$374 (K) / $349 (KF)8 / 163.8 / 5.11612516Dual DDR4-2933
Intel Core i5-10600K / KF$262 (K) / $237 (KF)6 / 124.1 / 4.81212516Dual DDR4-2666

The PTPP is open to mainstream and HEDT (high-end desktop) processors. The cost of insuring the first is $19.99, while the latter will set you back $29.99. No matter which Comet Lake CPU you pick, the PTPP will cost you the same $19.99, which is the same price charged for insuring Intel's 9th Gen CPUs. 

Looking at it from an economical standpoint, Intel's PTPP is a pretty good bargain for overclockers. Take the flagship Core i9-10900K, for example. The deca-core processor has gone up for preorder at $599.99, around $188 more expensive than Intel's MSRP. The PTPP represents less than 4% of the processor's cost. That's a small price to pay to protect your $600 investment. 

  • ThatMouse
    Seriously? How is Intel going to tell you overclocked it? You get a 3 year warranty included. Paying for PTPP does not extend the warranty. The CPU is designed to shutdown if you try to overclock it too much, so if it burns it's still technically a faulty CPU and it's not like they can turn it on and get a log of what happened.
    Reply
  • gg83
    Why hasn't Intel bumped up memory speeds past 3000mhz? Maybe with 14nm there is no real benefit from going that high?
    Reply
  • cyrusfox
    ThatMouse said:
    Seriously? How is Intel going to tell you overclocked it? You get a 3 year warranty included. Paying for PTPP does not extend the warranty. The CPU is designed to shutdown if you try to overclock it too much, so if it burns it's still technically a faulty CPU and it's not like they can turn it on and get a log of what happened.
    THey could tell, if they added a fuse that blows when clock multiplier is moved outside turbo configuration, would be really easy to check during the RMA process. Will they likely enforce it, no. The warranty is nice and can be purchased after acquiring the CPU if you want to start pushing it rather hard, and at $20, very reasonable.
    CPU will let you melt it with voltage, you could overvolt this and definitely kill it in minutes compared to the 3+year life span it is rated for at nominal voltage. Heat isn't what kills its higher voltage breaking things down.
    Reply
  • Suiton20
    gg83 said:
    Why hasn't Intel bumped up memory speeds past 3000mhz? Maybe with 14nm there is no real benefit from going that high?
    Even on ryzen you start hitting some diminishing returns after 2666. 2133 to 2666 can give about 5-10% fps gain on .1% lows removing most stutters. 2666 to 3000 gives 2-3%. Going past 3000 you barely gain a 1% for getting to 3200 and less than a 1% hitting 3600. Intel isn’t generally affected with memory speed limits. 2400 is where they hit diminishing returns. The ram speed support doesn’t mean squat anyway. Zen3 doesn’t really benefit from 3600 speeds unless you’re a pro overclocker trying to beat records. Amd is just dick measuring against intel with official 3600 support.
    Reply
  • Suiton20
    cyrusfox said:
    THey could tell, if they added a fuse that blows when clock multiplier is moved outside turbo configuration, would be really easy to check during the RMA process. Will they likely enforce it, no. The warranty is nice and can be purchased after acquiring the CPU if you want to start pushing it rather hard, and at $20, very reasonable.
    CPU will let you melt it with voltage, you could overvolt this and definitely kill it in minutes compared to the 3+year life span it is rated for at nominal voltage. Heat isn't what kills its higher voltage breaking things down.
    I highly doubt intel would add a overclocking fuse to the k chips. It would add to cost even if the fuse itself cost 5cents. R&d would add to the cost. Motherboard manufacturers already auto overclock the CPUs anyway. So if there is a fuse in there, it would easily pop the moment you fire up cinebench.
    Reply
  • gg83
    Suiton20 said:
    Even on ryzen you start hitting some diminishing returns after 2666. 2133 to 2666 can give about 5-10% fps gain on .1% lows removing most stutters. 2666 to 3000 gives 2-3%. Going past 3000 you barely gain a 1% for getting to 3200 and less than a 1% hitting 3600. Intel isn’t generally affected with memory speed limits. 2400 is where they hit diminishing returns. The ram speed support doesn’t mean squat anyway. Zen3 doesn’t really benefit from 3600 speeds unless you’re a pro overclocker trying to beat records. Amd is just dick measuring against intel with official 3600 support.
    thanks for the info. I suspected as much, but wasn't sure. I am really excited about the competition right now. We might see some killer advancements soon. Or just acquisitions of new tech that gets buried.
    Reply
  • ThatMouse
    cyrusfox said:
    THey could tell, if they added a fuse that blows when clock multiplier is moved outside turbo configuration, would be really easy to check during the RMA process. Will they likely enforce it, no. The warranty is nice and can be purchased after acquiring the CPU if you want to start pushing it rather hard, and at $20, very reasonable.
    CPU will let you melt it with voltage, you could overvolt this and definitely kill it in minutes compared to the 3+year life span it is rated for at nominal voltage. Heat isn't what kills its higher voltage breaking things down.

    There is some circuitry on the outside of the chip presumably related to ensuring proper power, but I'm not convinced a "fuse" exists that small. Intel should share photos to prove they can tell. They might sell more plans.
    Reply