Skip to main content

Intel Reveals Specifications For Arc Alchemist Desktop GPUs

Intel Arc Specs
(Image credit: Intel)

Intel has published (opens in new tab) the specifications of all of its Arc Alchemist A-series discrete graphics cards for desktop PCs. Initially, Intel plans to release four graphics cards aimed at demanding, budget, and casual gamers.

Intel's Arc A-series family for desktops will consist of Arc A770, Arc A750, Arc A580, and the already well-known Arc A380. For now, Intel releases specifications of actual graphics processing units and recommended memory configurations, but graphics cards from the company's partners may have higher clocks and higher performance.

The Arc A770 will be Intel's top-of-the-range model based on the ACM-G10 graphics processor with 32 Xe cores (equivalent to 4,096 stream processors) operating at 2,100 MHz and equipped with 8GB or 16GB of GDDR6 memory featuring a peak bandwidth of 560 GBps. The Arc A750 will sit slightly below the flagship and feature a cut-down ACM-G10 GPU with 28 Xe cores (equivalent to 3,584 shading units) working at 2,050 MHz and connected to 8GB of GDDR6 memory with a peak bandwidth of 512 GBps. Both cards might find themselves among the best graphics cards, provided that they work flawlessly, offer decent performance, and their price is right.

Intel Arc Alchemist Specifications

Intel Arc Alchemist Specifications
Arc A770Arc A750Arc A580Arc A380
ArchitectureACM-G10ACM-G10ACM-G10ACM-G11
Process TechnologyTSMC N6TSMC N6TSMC N6TSMC N6
Transistors (Billion)21.721.721.77.2
Die size (mm^2)406406406157
Xe-Cores3228248
GPU Cores (Shaders)4096358430721024
MXM Engines512448384128
RTUs3228248
Game Clock (MHz)2100205017002000
VRAM Speed (Gbps)17.5161615.5
VRAM (GB)16/8886
VRAM Bus Width25625625696
ROPs12812812832
TMUs25622419264
TFLOPS FP32 (Boost)17.214.710.44.1
TFLOPS FP16 (MXM)1381188433
Bandwidth (GBps)560512512186
TDP (watts)225225150?75
Launch DateOct 2022?Oct 2022?Oct 2022?Jun-22

Intel's Arc A580 will sit below the A750 and target gamers on a budget who still want to get a taste of Intel's top-end discrete GPU. This board will feature 24 Xe cores (3,072 shading units) running at 1,700 MHz so that it will be more than 30% slower than the top-of-the-range Arc A770. In addition, graphics cards based on the Arc A580 will carry 8GB of GDDR6 memory with up to 512GBps bandwidth.

Intel's entry-level offering is the Arc A380 based on the ACM-G11 GPU with eight Xe cores (1,024 shading units) operating at 2,000 MHz and connected to 6GB of GDDR6 memory. This board is already available from Newegg for $140 (opens in new tab).

Intel said that its IBCs — Intel branded cards — produced in Malaysia will be available starting Day 1 (but we do not know which day is day 1, for now), but it did not say anything about boards from its partners. The company also did not touch upon the prices of its graphics cards or recommended prices for partner boards. Still, considering that it positions its Arc A770 against Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3060 Ti, one can make some guesses about the pricing of these products. In a recent interview, Intel stated that Arc Alchemist desktop graphics cards will launch "very soon."

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • InvalidError
    The paper gap between the A380 and A580 is ginormous. I'm hoping pricing will make it a value king.
    Reply
  • mo_osk
    If the performance scales proportionally to the number of cores and if intel keep its promise when it comes to price, then the arc series should really be interesting bargain. If you know you wont be playing one of the numerous game that has some support issues by the driver...
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    very interesting, just having Intel in the GPU market will force AMD/Nvidia not to go crazy with prices.
    Especially AMD, they like to price match NVIDIA too often.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    wifiburger said:
    very interesting, just having Intel in the GPU market will force AMD/Nvidia not to go crazy with prices.
    Especially AMD, they like to price match NVIDIA too often.
    It’s good to have more competition for sure. But Intel will not be competitive in their current gen and potentially next gen GPU. Unless of course the next gen is on course for next year, otherwise, they will be 1 gen behind when it comes to performance.
    Reply
  • Gu3sts
    Looks like the A750 is a cut down or bits disabled A770
    Is it technically possible For a 16GB vram A750
    TDP suggests 1x 8pin (150watts) + 75 watts motherboard provided
    Reply
  • artk2219
    wifiburger said:
    very interesting, just having Intel in the GPU market will force AMD/Nvidia not to go crazy with prices.
    Especially AMD, they like to price match NVIDIA too often.

    Can you blame them? If your customers are willing to pay the price and you're making sales, from a business perspective theres no reason not to, especially when it comes to expensive multi year development efforts like creating GPU's. Also to be fair these last couple of years have been weird, they typically are cheaper at retail, currently you can pickup RX 6600's for less than RTX 3050's and 3060's. The RX 6600 wipes the floor with the 3050 in everything except ray tracing, and even there its within 10%, and is mostly on par with the 3060 in anything not ray tracing while being significantly less than both.
    Reply
  • computerguy72
    Sadly it looks like Arc is already discontinued. i.e. I wish Intel could have stuck it out and competed with AMD and NV in the discrete business. Lots of articles today about how they decided not to go forward with it those interested can do a search.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    computerguy72 said:
    Lots of articles today about how they decided not to go forward with it those interested can do a search.
    Lots of articles written about one single source.

    I find it very strange that Intel's marketing is putting so much time and effort into marketing an allegedly dead-end product. If management already made the call to cancel the whole thing, it may make more sense to scrap the wafers to avoid having to support cancelled GPUs for the next 3-7 years.
    Reply