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HyperX Releases HyperX Predator PCIe SSD

HyperX, a division of Kingston Technology Company, announced the HyperX Predator PCIe SSD today in 240 GB and 480 GB capacities. The Predator's performance specifications jump right off the page with 1,400 MBps and 1,000 MBps of sequential read/write speed. The specifications alone tip us off that the Predator is a PCIe SSD; the throughput far outstrips the boundaries of the traditional SATA 6 Gbps connection.

The random performance specifications are equally impressive at speeds up to 130,000/118,000 random read/write IOPS. Another redeeming quality is the amazing endurance rating of 1.7 Drive Writes Per Day (DWPD). This is far beyond the normal endurance of a typical consumer SSD and supports up to 805 GB of writes per day over the 3-year warranty period. The healthy endurance rating will even make it suitable for more demanding prosumer and enterprise applications. 

The m.2 slot is becoming more common on motherboards, but unfortunately many of the current crop of m.2 SSDs are hamstrung by SATA 6 Gbps controllers. The HyperX Predator satisfies our speed cravings by leveraging the first Marvell Altaplus 88SS9293 SSD controller we've seen on a shipping product. This controller connects via AHCI over the PCIe 2.0 x4 interface and offers more speed than the SATA 6 Gbps m.2 SSDs currently on the market.

The Predator comes in either a PCIe adapter that allows use in motherboards without an m.2 slot, or separately as a single m.2 SSD. The HyperX Predator is geared for the enthusiast crowd, and its pricing reflects that at nearly $1 per GB. Many users will also crave more capacity than the 480 GB available, but there is precious little competition in the m.2 PCIe SSD market. Currently, the highest capacities on the market weigh in at 512 GB.

Options are limited. Currently, only one other product, the Samsung XP941, offers the full benefits of the PCIe connection. The Samsung SM951 sports a PCIe 3.0 x4 connection, but it has only been spotted in OEM products so far. We expect availability through limited distribution channels, such as RamCity, next month.

We also have yet to see any client-oriented NVMe products enter the market. Plextor will also launch a Marvell Altaplus-based SSD soon, the M7e, which should foster some competition in the pricing department.

The m.2 crowd also seems to favor shorter warranty periods. Some 2.5" SSDs carry ten-year warranties, but both the Kingston and Samsung m.2 offerings only offer 3-year periods. Perhaps in the future we might see longer warranty periods as more manufacturers enter this space.

For those searching for bleeding-edge performance in the m.2 form factor, the HyperX Predator seems to fit the bill, but as always, we will see how it stacks up in real world testing in our forthcoming review. Stay tuned.

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  • tical2399
    Still waiting on the pcie 3.0 4x m.2 drives
    Reply
  • knowom
    Fast, but talk about price gouging at $1 GB you'd be much much better off buying more ram for a ram disk or volume cache on a USB or cheap SATA SSD flash drive.

    I can get more performance from a USB 2.0 flash drive with software volume caching so that's a bit pathetic and w/o using a abundance of system ram to do so you can get by with 512MB of memory for software partition caching for blistering performance that smokes that. I don't get why Tom's Hardware never does articles on that. I knew the direction SSD's were trending in long before they ever did software caching faster physical interfaces and more on board cache.

    It's really sad my USB 2.0 flash drive and software cache is faster than the fastest physical SSD on the market though. Enough with PCIe x4 and x8 quit gouging and bring on PCIe x16 SSD's anything else is too slow.

    In fact what we should have VGA speed enhanced SSD's and ram disk's, but the industry is slow to adopt and wants to price gouge. Video card's have the highest bandwidth of any components in a PC by a long shot there is no reason we can't have them accelerate HD speeds by leaps and bounds.
    Reply
  • ragenalien
    Pricing on that had better come down. It's almost $2GB. That's more than getting an OEM samsung drive from a 3rd party.
    Reply
  • Kewlx25
    15539598 said:
    Fast, but talk about price gouging at $1 GB you'd be much much better off buying more ram for a ram disk or volume cache on a USB or cheap SATA SSD flash drive.

    I can get more performance from a USB 2.0 flash drive with software volume caching so that's a bit pathetic and w/o using a abundance of system ram to do so you can get by with 512MB of memory for software partition caching for blistering performance that smokes that. I don't get why Tom's Hardware never does articles on that. I knew the direction SSD's were trending in long before they ever did software caching faster physical interfaces and more on board cache.

    It's really sad my USB 2.0 flash drive and software cache is faster than the fastest physical SSD on the market though. Enough with PCIe x4 and x8 quit gouging and bring on PCIe x16 SSD's anything else is too slow.

    In fact what we should have VGA speed enhanced SSD's and ram disk's, but the industry is slow to adopt and wants to price gouge. Video card's have the highest bandwidth of any components in a PC by a long shot there is no reason we can't have them accelerate HD speeds by leaps and bounds.

    USB2 or USB3? Even for USB3, I can't find a review that shows a USB stick that is anything close to a SATA SSD, yet alone a this SSD. Trolling?
    Reply
  • gasparmx
    "HyperX Releases HyperX" Didn't know a product can release by himself lol.
    Reply
  • paesan
    Price is $764 for the 480GB, that is $1.59GB.
    Reply
  • firefoxx04
    Does that guy really think his chappy flash drive out performs every single ssd on the market? You are kidding me right?

    Caching files to a ram drive isn't a new thing and it's not something people want.

    We want fast boot up and fast application opening without running stuff within a temporary ram drive.

    It must be hard to think.
    Reply
  • Haravikk
    That's pretty expensive considering it's already behind on speeds, aren't there PCIe SSDs pushing past 2gbps?
    Reply
  • PaulAlcorn
    "HyperX Releases HyperX" Didn't know a product can release by himself lol.

    It does sound odd, doesn't it? KIngston split HyperX off into its own division, so oddly enough that division releases its own branded products.
    Reply
  • l337skillz
    Does this m.2 to PCIe adapter support any m.2 SSD?

    Since not many MOBO's support this natively yet.

    Samsung's SM951 PCIe SSD comes to mind.
    Reply