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Newegg Launches GPU-Shopping Portal Designed to Sell You a GPU

Asus GPU pricing slashed
(Image credit: Asus ROG)

Newegg has launched JustGPU.com, a website dedicated solely to — you guessed it — GPUs. Specifically, shopping for a new GPU. (Or, well, selling you a new GPU.)

The website, which is — of course — an extension of Newegg's online store, is designed to make shopping for a new graphics card as smooth and painless (and profitable, for Newegg) as possible. The site includes a GPU comparison tool complete with benchmarks and gaming performance data. The new site, which is still in beta, features GPU-specific shopping tools not found on the regular Newegg site.

The main page gives you access to several GPU shopping options right off the bat, with a button to "shop all" GPUs on Newegg's site, a button that takes you to Newegg's benchmark comparison tool, and links to the top five most popular AIB partner brands (ASRock, Asus, Evga, Gigabyte, and MSI). 

JustGPU.com Website

(Image credit: Newegg - JustGPU.com)

Scroll down, and you'll see a list of exclusive discounts and deals, ranging from $10 to $100 off (these deals appear to be "exclusive" to Newegg in general — not to the new site). Scroll further, and you'll see summaries of the current top-selling GPUs, and then you'll gain access to JustGPU's GPU comparison utility. 

The GPU comparison utility is a tool that lets you compare two different graphics cards on the fly. Choose the graphics cards you want to compare (you can filter by manufacturer and GPU series, or just do a text search), and the GPU comparison utility will show you price, size, core specifications, and gaming performance metrics for a number of popular titles (including Apex Legends, Cyberpunk 2077, and Elden Ring) — plus a 3DMark TimeSpy result for something more synthetic.

JustGPU.com Website

(Image credit: Newegg - JustGPU.com)

These performance metrics really set the site apart from Newegg's regular site, which lacks any sort of performance data. Besides the GPU comparison tool, each listing on the site has the GPU's associated TimeSpy performance score and estimated average frame rate result in a popular AAA title (in today's case, this includes Call of Duty: Warzone). 

If you click on the gaming metrics in each listing, you are greeted with a new interface where you can input your CPU and resolution for a more accurate frame rate analysis. On this page you're also greeted with 18 additional titles (and their respective frame rate data).

The interface itself is simple and well laid-out, with easy access to important shopping tools. Each listing automatically goes back to Newegg's own listing — including the shopping cart — confirming this is, unsurprisingly, mainly a Newegg shopping tool.

JustGPU.com Website

(Image credit: Newegg - JustGPU.com)

One big downside to the site is that it lacks data for previous generations. Only Nvidia's RTX 30 series and AMD's RX 6000 series graphics cards are listed at the moment — but the site is still in beta, so this could change. 

The new site appears to be a decent resource for comparing current GPUs side-by-side while also quickly checking Newegg's current pricing and stock, if that's what you need. But the performance metrics should be taken with a grain of salt, since they appear to be pretty generalized. And for more detailed metrics — and comparison data on GPUs older than just the current generation — check out our GPU hierarchy.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • CompuGuy71
    Barf. I'd rather not.
    Reply
  • toaste
    The “Benchmark GPU” button brings you to a comparison rather than running some (inadequate) benchmark of your current GPU as a baseline like you’d expect and could find at a site like userbenchmark. You’re far better served by https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html
    Then you see it points you to an RTX 3070 vs RTX 3080 comparison. The little note that it’s at 1080p on an unspecified gen of i7 is the cherry on top. If you plan to run that hardware just for 1080p you are lighting money on fire… which I suppose must be their intended audience.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Disclaimer: Benchmarks including Frames Per Second (FPS) and Time Spy Score are estimations based on system configurations. Data is provided by 3DMark directly and not Newegg. Actual performance may vary.

    That alone makes it even worse than UserBenchmark...
    Reply
  • neojack
    does the tool offer a price to performance comparaison ? and taking account for the prices at any given moment (including specials) ? if so it could be nice.
    Reply
  • Blackink
    toaste said:
    The “Benchmark GPU” button brings you to a comparison rather than running some (inadequate) benchmark of your current GPU as a baseline like you’d expect and could find at a site like userbenchmark. You’re far better served by https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html

    That site can't be reached.....
    Reply
  • JimboCA
    What would make the tool better is if it included legacy GPUs. That way, consumers can compare what they have today with what they are contemplating tomorrow. Lets you see how much faster things will be. They need to include system spec as well. The GPU is one part of the equation. System speed, memory speed, etc all lead into the equation.
    Reply
  • ConfusedCounsel
    Okay but why? Even with Nvidia's price drops, the value proposition of getting a GPU now is ____. Well, I guess it would be altruistic. The more people who buy now the faster the AIBs clear out the surplus. The faster the AIBs clear out the surplus the sooner Nvidia launches the 4080 and 4070 - which will perform the same or better as the 3090 and 3080 but cost less. So, I could be a nice guy and buy a 3080 to pay more today for the same level of performance I will get form a 4070 in few months at a cheaper price. Or I could be selfish and save myself money by waiting a few months. Now if Nvidia drops the price of each card a full tier, i.e., sells the 3080 for $500 and the 3090 for $700 maybe.
    Reply
  • CDS1972
    I will refuse to purchase GPUs from Newegg as I hold them partially responsible for the ease that bitcoin miners had at purchasing graphics cards from them,
    In fact I would not be the least bit surprised if evidence was found proving that they were knowingly engaged in selling most of their stock to the miners and were only listing a handful of their stock for the average person to buy.
    Reply
  • ConfusedCounsel
    CDS1972 said:
    I will refuse to purchase GPUs from Newegg as I hold them partially responsible for the ease that bitcoin miners had at purchasing graphics cards from them,
    In fact I would not be the least bit surprised if evidence was found proving that they were knowingly engaged in selling most of their stock to the miners and were only listing a handful of their stock for the average person to buy.
    You forget about the Newegg Shuffle. It protected graphic cards from miners through a raffle where lucky winners needing a graphics card to keep their kids in virtual school during a pandemic were forced buy e-waste along with an overpriced graphics card. On that note, I managed to keep my daughter online with an overclocked FX processor and two 950's in an SLI configuration. Eventually we won the shuffle and got her a more stable configuration. Anyone need a bronze EVGA 700 Watt PSU still in original shrink wrap?

    Seriously, Nvidia and Newegg have a lot of good will to win back. This is just a shameful rebranding attempt.
    Reply
  • anthony_188
    I will never buy from Newegg again.
    Reply