Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang Apologizes For 'Miscommunication' On GTX 970 Specs

With Nvidia customers still fuming about the misleading specs of the GeForce GTX 970, along with a recent lawsuit filing against Nvidia, the company's president and CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang, posted an open letter explaining the miscommunication within the company and apologizing to customers.

In the eyes of the consumer, the biggest issue with the GTX 970 was the memory, which some believe is misleading because the advertised capacity was 4 GB but was really 3.5 GB, with the final 512 MB of memory segmented with a smaller bandwidth.

Huang said that the split in memory was the company's new memory architecture and was created to give reduced configurations of Maxwell a larger frame buffer.

"This is a good design because we were able to add an additional 1 GB for GTX 970 and our software engineers can keep less frequently used data in the 512 MB segment," he said.

But what happened between Nvidia's engineering and marketing division was a failure to communicate. By not relaying the specifics of the video memory to marketing, and thus to reviewers, customers were then misled about how the 4 GB of memory was actually implemented on the card. Huang wanted people to be excited about the 970, but the miscommunication resulted in frustrated and angry customers.

As Nvidia moves forward after this incident, Huang assured customers that features will be "clearly detailed from the beginning," and he said that the company "won't let this happen again." Hopefully, its efforts will be enough to regain the trust of old customers.

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  • Oldbutstillatit
    No mention of the other lies either.
  • Onus
    This reinforces the lesson taught by the Bulldozer fiasco that Marketing needs to be called to heel. With unsophisticated users of unsophisticated products, these droids can get away with bending the truth, or misinterpreting it in what looks like favorable ways, but in this market, they can't, and it is going to hurt company reputations, sometimes badly. This is not a case of outright lies (as in the case of PSUs not good for their labels), but of a more or less accurate "label" (the card does have 4GB of VRAM) that is easily misunderstood. Ignorant, yes (marketing droids, remember), but malevolent? No.
  • Other Comments
  • ny-tech
    Miscommunication? I fail to see how engineering and marketing can not be in sync over the course of the 12-18 MONTH cycle of product development. Publishing deflection only makes it worse. How about a live polygraph interview? No regret over how you have tarnished your product line with inept management or collusion to defraud? Unfortunately, having you publish the words "We won’t let this happen again" does nothing to allay the fear that your company or frankly any company will twist facts and outright lie if it gets those quarterly earnings up. It was bonus season afterall. I had a GTX 970. I was satisfied with its performance. I sent it back in protest of your fraud. I filed a complaint with the FTC and the BBB. I plan to join the class actions. Heck, I even wrote Elizabeth Warren a letter. Your product came into my space and on its label was a lie. That can not stand. There should be consequences for lying, for screwing up. If you get away with it others will try to as well. You should just be happy you don't make faulty ignition switches for automobiles!
  • Steveymoo
    Well, technically, the cards did have 4gb of memory, even though 512MB of it is practically unusable. So I should imagine, if someone attempts a class action lawsuit here, they will not really get very far.
  • Oldbutstillatit
    No mention of the other lies either.