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A Sealed Super Mario Game Sold for $660,000

Super Mario Brothers Cartridge
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

We all buy things that we never unpack. Normally, we pass those items on to someone who might need them. But some of us are smart enough not to do so and get rich instead. 

This is exactly what occurred to a copy of the original Super Mario Bros. titled by its seller as 'Super Mario Bros. - Wata 9.6 A+ Sealed [Hangtab, 1 Code, Mid-Production], NES Nintendo 1985 USA.' According to a Eurogamer report that cites Heritage Auctions, this one happens to be the fourth version of Super Mario Bros. produced, with "Wata 9.6 A+" referring to this particular cartridge's condition rating from collectible grading company WataGames. The game was released in 1986. 

"This particular copy was produced in late 1986, and it was one of the earliest copies produced that had plastic shrink wrap, rather than sticker seal," Heritage Auctions said in its report on the item. "By early 1987, Nintendo was producing a version that had another new variation to their original packaging (an additional 'code'). Since the production window for this copy and others like it was so short, finding another copy from this same production run in similar condition would be akin to looking for a single drop of water in an ocean. Never say never, but there's a good chance it can't be done." 

Heritage Auctions says that the video game was bought as a Christmas gift, but it ended up in a drawer and was discovered only recently.  

"It stayed in the bottom of my office desk this whole time since the day I bought it," the owner reportedly told the auction group. "I never thought anything about it." 

Rare and limited releases are not uncommon, especially in the video game world, where various editions are made with different kinds of exclusive content. To that end, buying a rare item is not something extraordinary today. Keeping these things unopened for 35 years is a different thing completely, though.  

At this point, you cannot really play a game cartridge for the original NES unless you still have that console (or a copycat console). Ultimately, this $660,000 game is a collectible that is not supposed to be unpacked but instead resold somewhere down the line.

  • spongiemaster
    So, someone paid $660,000 for some shrink wrap? Good for the guy who sold it.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    It's a bit like cryptocurrency, or GameStop stock. More or less worthless, unless someone manages to con others into thinking its worth something. : P
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    Well that set of Pokemon cards I've been holding onto suddenly skyrocketed in value. Maybe it's time to cash in. 😂
    Reply
  • Phaaze88
    /sigh, People put value on some of the dumbest things...

    cryoburner said:
    It's a bit like cryptocurrency, or GameStop stock. More or less worthless, unless someone manages to con others into thinking its worth something. : P
    Just like those NFTs... WTH.

    Mod Edit - Inappropriate content
    Reply
  • adamboy64
    Congrats to the owner who kept it in such immaculate condition.
    Earned themselves a small fortune.

    I wonder what sort of items will be coming up in these auctions in another 35 years time..
    Reply
  • randomizer
    Admin said:
    A video game that you cannot play sells for the price of a mansion.

    Or a shoebox apartment, depending on where you live.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    A real NES plus this game/bunch of games can be had for $100-150 on ebay.
    Which is a lot for an ancient console but very much manageable.

    This is very much a push by wada to make comic book/baseball card collectors interested in vintage video games, it's a big auction house so it gives them credibility.

    Mod Edit
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    adamboy64 said:
    I wonder what sort of items will be coming up in these auctions in another 35 years time..
    Never opened GTA V from 2014 for 2mil.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    Phaaze88 said:
    /sigh, People put value on some of the dumbest things...
    I'm sure people would say the same about stuff you spent "more money than you should've" on.

    Mod Edit
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  • Phaaze88
    hotaru.hino said:
    I'm sure people would say the same about stuff you spent "more money than you should've" on.
    I know, right? We're not on a forum where we're all entitled to our own opinions and such... resulting in some people taking offense to them and others forcing their own gospel on one another...
    :unsure:

    Like that person who sold a game cartridge for over half a mil? Smart? Or just lucky on an opportunity that doesn't happen often? Either way, nice score.
    Or the person who bought said cartridge? That kind of money is just a drop in the bucket, huh? Like, "Wow, really?" Maybe 10 years down the line they sell it for 1mil.
    The most expensive single purchase on a leisure luxury I ever made - besides necessities like travel, housing, etc - is a 1080Ti for ~710USD. I got nothing compared to that guy.

    More money than sense is a thing, and could be categorized as a mental disorder; there are people out there with so much money that they are out of touch with their local economy/society.

    I have my opinion on this piece, you have yours, which is clearly different from mine.
    Let's just leave it at that, yeah?
    Reply