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Threadripper Pro 5000WX CPUs Arrive In China, 64 Cores For $7,000

Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5000WX
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5000WX (Image credit: Hoang Anh Phu/Twitter)

According to a Tweet by Hoang Anh Phuh (opens in new tab), AMD's 7nm Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5000WX processors with Zen 3 cores are finally selling in China. However, prices are incredibly high compared to its Zen 2 predecessors, with pricing on the 64-core model double that of the Ryzen Threadripper 3990X's MSRP of $4,000. For now, take these results with a grain of salt. There is a possibility that these prices are not official. Thankfully these extreme price hikes are only regulated in China for now. Hopefully, we won't see the same phenomenon in other markets.

Starting with the cheapest models, the 24-core Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5965WX is on sale for 17,200 CNY or $2,572. The 32-core Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX is going for 24,000 CNY or $3,589, and the 64-core Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5995WX has a substantially higher price at a whopping 47,000 CNY or $7,029.

These prices are substantially higher than the full MSRP of AMD's previous generation Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3000WX parts. For example, the 32-core Threadripper Pro 3975WX sells for $2,749, and the 64-core Threadripper Pro 3995WX costs "just" $5,489. Unfortunately, there is no 24-core model to compare results.

Prices on Threadripper Pro 5000WX are pretty high and not a value bargain like AMD's mainstream Ryzen 5000 chips. Nonetheless, the core-heavy chips will appease prosumers and workstation users that need firepower for heavy tasks, such as rendering, image, video manipulation, etc.

AMD has the HEDT market hostage since Intel, at this time has nothing to compete within this market. In addition, HEDT processors are slowly disappearing from the market, according to some reports. Admittedly, it's been a while since we've seen a new HEDT platform from Intel or AMD. Nonetheless, AMD's commitment to the HEDT stands firm as the chipmaker has already shared a client roadmap detailing the next-generation Threadripper chips with Zen 4 cores, which may arrive in 2023.

Aaron Klotz
Aaron Klotz

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • InvalidError
    The WX ("Pro") series aren't really meant for HEDT. As AMD put it in its analyst day, those are aimed at "workstations and professional" uses, nothing about HEDT there. It remains to be seen whether AMD will resurrect the non-Pro/WX lineup with Zen 4.

    As far as the traditional in-between desktop and server pricing and features HEDT used to stand for go, HEDT is a current-gen wasteland.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    Ohhhhh, China only huh?!
    "It speaks volumes that Intel AMD isn't launching this in the US first, though!"

    "When do we see any foreign (to China) companies launch stuff in China first? That almost only happens when companies release China-exclusive crippled variants of popular models.

    What does that say about Intel? AMD That it doesn't expect the products to perform well enough to survive criticism in the rest of the world in its current state. "
    Reply
  • asri1334
    Thanks for sharing such great information, the post you published have some great information which is quite beneficial for me.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    InvalidError said:
    The WX ("Pro") series aren't really meant for HEDT. As AMD put it in its analyst day, those are aimed at "workstations and professional" uses, nothing about HEDT there. It remains to be seen whether AMD will resurrect the non-Pro/WX lineup with Zen 4.

    As far as the traditional in-between desktop and server pricing and features HEDT used to stand for go, HEDT is a current-gen wasteland.
    I mean, I do agree in part with you there, but HEDT and "Server-like parts" have been always separated by a thin veil and never properly defined. So while I do side with you on the sentiment, I can't on the technicality.

    TerryLaze said:
    Ohhhhh, China only huh?!
    "It speaks volumes that Intel AMD isn't launching this in the US first, though!"

    "When do we see any foreign (to China) companies launch stuff in China first? That almost only happens when companies release China-exclusive crippled variants of popular models.

    What does that say about Intel? AMD That it doesn't expect the products to perform well enough to survive criticism in the rest of the world in its current state. "
    Haha, I was going to whine about the same exact thing xD

    I want to see these in the US or EU markets!

    Regards.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    -Fran- said:
    I mean, I do agree in part with you there, but HEDT and "Server-like parts" have been always separated by a thin veil and never properly defined. So while I do side with you on the sentiment, I can't on the technicality.
    Lets size that 'technicality' up on AMD's side when compared to when AMD was actively involved in HEDT...
    only single socket possible on HEDT, dual sockets on servers
    60 usable PCIe lanes for HEDT vs 128 for servers/WX
    quad-channel memory for HEDT vs octo-channel for servers/WX (12 channels for next-gen on SP5)
    I'd say those three largest differences amount to more than just a technicality. On Intel's side, there just hasn't been any HEDT for a while.
    Reply
  • escksu
    InvalidError said:
    The WX ("Pro") series aren't really meant for HEDT. As AMD put it in its analyst day, those are aimed at "workstations and professional" uses, nothing about HEDT there. It remains to be seen whether AMD will resurrect the non-Pro/WX lineup with Zen 4.

    As far as the traditional in-between desktop and server pricing and features HEDT used to stand for go, HEDT is a current-gen wasteland.

    I don't think AMD has any plants to revive HEDT. Volume is just way too low. Margins are also not as good compared to workstations. Doesn't justify it's revival.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    InvalidError said:
    Lets size that 'technicality' up on AMD's side when compared to when AMD was actively involved in HEDT...
    only single socket possible on HEDT, dual sockets on servers
    60 usable PCIe lanes for HEDT vs 128 for servers/WX
    quad-channel memory for HEDT vs octo-channel for servers/WX (12 channels for next-gen on SP5)I'd say those three largest differences amount to more than just a technicality. On Intel's side, there just hasn't been any HEDT for a while.
    So can you have dual socket WX'es? Can you run non-ECC with WX'es? Do you need to fill all 8 RAM slots for Octo Channel or just run Single, Dual or Quad?

    Also, you could also see it the other way: they're increasing the HEDT capability by bringing it even closer to server (more lanes, more cores, more everything over regular consumer). That's why I don't fully agree with your view. What "middle ground" is there to define HEDT? "It needs to be exactly half of what a single socket server can do"?

    Keep in mind that, well, according to AMD, Thread Ripper was never meant to exist and it was a "quick hack job" that ended up being an important item in their lineup. Or so the story goes~

    AM5 will bring a lot of connectivity and bells and whistles that bring it up to current "prosumer" ThreadRipper level, if you look at the capabilities. Only lacking elements would be Quad Channel? 64 cores CPU? Everything else, you could make a strong argument it's pretty darn close to current (old) TR as a platform.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • gg83
    TerryLaze said:
    Ohhhhh, China only huh?!
    "It speaks volumes that Intel AMD isn't launching this in the US first, though!"

    "When do we see any foreign (to China) companies launch stuff in China first? That almost only happens when companies release China-exclusive crippled variants of popular models.

    What does that say about Intel? AMD That it doesn't expect the products to perform well enough to survive criticism in the rest of the world in its current state. "
    Could it be there is a really high demand in China? Or is it a form of testing ground? Or were the chips meant for review?
    InvalidError said:
    Lets size that 'technicality' up on AMD's side when compared to when AMD was actively involved in HEDT...
    only single socket possible on HEDT, dual sockets on servers
    60 usable PCIe lanes for HEDT vs 128 for servers/WX
    quad-channel memory for HEDT vs octo-channel for servers/WX (12 channels for next-gen on SP5)I'd say those three largest differences amount to more than just a technicality. On Intel's side, there just hasn't been any HEDT for a while.
    I was about to ask the difference between the two. You summed it up perfectly.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    -Fran- said:
    What "middle ground" is there to define HEDT? "It needs to be exactly half of what a single socket server can do"?
    It doesn't need to be half, though it would be a logical place to be when the gap between desktop and server is so massive and about to get even larger.

    If your only choice for "HEDT" is to buy what amounts to a full-blown server chip, put it on what is a full-blown server motherboard, then pay the same amount as a full-blown server CPU ($1500-6000) and motherboard ($1000+) which are being marketed as high-end workstations or entry-level servers, then you are buying a 1P-server class system, not an HEDT one. The ThreadRipper 3995WX is a $5600 extra on Puget's configurator, which makes it more expensive than EPYC 7713P's MSRP.

    Also note that the TR Pro/WX and its motherboards are effectively OEM-only, nearly impossible to get a hold of in any way other than buying a pre-built workstation or server based on it, much like servers tend to be.

    AMD is basically telling WX/Pro customers: "may as well just go straight EPYC."
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    I wonder how AMD will respond once Intel's Fish Hawk Fall's Xeon WorkStation / HEDT equivalent comes out.
    Reply