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The Windows 10 Creators Update Is Now Available To Everyone

Microsoft announced that the Windows 10 Creators Update is now available to everyone with a compatible system.

Reading that sentence in July might seem weird, given that the Creators Update was released in April, and that the Fall Creators Update is set to debut in the coming months. But the announcement matters because Microsoft has been experimenting with a different update process, which could help consumers and business customers alike the chance to get the latest version of Windows on a more predictable timeframe.

Microsoft explained the importance of today's announcement in a blog post:

We are excited to make the Creators Update fully available to all our customers. We also encourage commercial organizations to begin broadly deploying Windows 10, version 1703, if you haven’t already done so. You can verify your system is up to date on the Windows Security page. We will continue to ensure all eligible devices can now move forward to the Creators Update, if you are having trouble updating your device, see this helpful article. Staying up to date on both the latest feature and quality updates assures you of being on the most secure version of Windows 10 ever (version 1703).

Operating system updates can be a pain in the butt. You should make sure you back up your system, of course, and once you do that you'll have to wait for the update to download and install. Predicting how long that might take is hard, and you probably won't update if you're in the middle of doing something. You might also put off an update if you're worried that it will create problems with your hardware or apps you rely upon.

At the same time, however, delaying operating system updates can put a system at risk. Outdated versions of Windows are likely to have vulnerabilities that new versions of the operating system don't. You have to balance the pros of updating to a new version of Windows (more security, new features) with the cons (possible hardware issues, incompatible apps). Microsoft's new rollout process is supposed to help.

The Creators Update debuted in stages. Enthusiasts could manually install the update starting on April 5, and it was officially released on April 11. Then on April 25 the company advised Windows 10 users not to force the upgrade and to wait for the Windows 10 Update Assistant to let you know when you should, well, update. Today's announcement marks the first time Microsoft has advised everyone to install the Creators Update.

  • AnimeMania
    Does this mean that people with Windows XP computers will be allowed to upgrade to Windows 10 Creators? Is this a free upgrade?
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    No it is not a free upgrade for windows xp.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    19990428 said:
    Does this mean that people with Windows XP computers will be allowed to upgrade to Windows 10 Creators? Is this a free upgrade?

    No, this is just the regular update to an existing Win 10 system.
    Reply
  • bnrusso
    This update takes several hours once it starts. If you reboot a business computer and start that process you probably will have to go home for the day. Then when you finally can login updates start all over and put lots of games and other unwanted garbage on you system. You also lose the control panel under the right click of the windows icon. I think it's worse now than windows 8 and time to switch 35 business computers to Linux.
    Reply
  • benedict78
    The creators update is a buggy mess and I'll postpone updating for as long as it's possible.
    Reply
  • ledhead11
    Been using MS since MS-Dos days. I got CU for my home computers and have had to deal with what it keeps breaking at home. With the 30+ computers I manage at my job my opinion of Windows continues to sink. Every time an update comes out I can practically hold my breath until a user calls because a printer driver or something has stopped working. To me its become a tall steaming pile of ----. I know the rhetoric of it has increased security and how the dev's are given months notice of how their drivers will need to be updated but that doesn't help the average user or companies who're losing thousands trying to keep this mess running. I've also witnessed how Windows doesn't always grab a newer driver from the manufacturer even when its passed certification. From Intel bluetooth drivers to HP there are some basic things it likes to break. Not even getting into what I'm still dealing with NV and 4k HDR.

    If all you do is email and youtube(some have even had issues with that) then CU could be good for you. Throw in anything else and sooner or later it will make something worse.

    I'm also questioning whether MS has become a stakeholder in ISP's lately. I mean, has anyone been paying attention to the 3-6GB per mo. they're throwing at us. Multiply that times the amount of 10 users and I'm sure the global bandwidth usage is staggering.
    Reply
  • grimfox
    You guys are assuming that CU actually downloads and installs correctly. My home PC has been failing to install this update for a couple of months now. Most of the threads on this issue have said the best solution for borked updates is to do a windows reset. Which is the solution for most windows 10 problems. I feel like Microsoft is just not able to test their updates on Win10 like they were with previous generations. This is further evidenced by their expansion of the bug bounty program.
    Reply
  • ledhead11
    19992781 said:
    You guys are assuming that CU actually downloads and installs correctly. My home PC has been failing to install this update for a couple of months now. Most of the threads on this issue have said the best solution for borked updates is to do a windows reset. Which is the solution for most windows 10 problems. I feel like Microsoft is just not able to test their updates on Win10 like they were with previous generations. This is further evidenced by their expansion of the bug bounty program.

    I totally agree. That's I keep posting in any 10 update related thread that they just need to slow down with features and just fix what they have.

    Reply
  • If you are on Windows 7, do not install it, friendly advice because you are not gaining anything with Windows 10 especially if you have business. If you are on Win10 1511, again do not install it because Fall Creators Update is out soon. If you have general problems with Windows 10 and you don't care about UWP go back to Windows 7. From what i see Windows 10 is limping and MS is beating dead horse with it.
    Reply
  • MNPolarbear
    1) This is an update strictly for people who already are running Windows 10.
    2) Windows 7 users cannot use this as an upgrade point. Windows 10 must be purchased and installed before the Windows 10 CU can be installed.
    3) I really don't have any issues with Windows 10 other than post installation of the CU that I've been dealing with a sleep state issue related to my display where it doesn't wake up properly which results in unwanted screen flicker on my 4k display. My only option is to quick change screen resolutions to something else and back again which appears to stop the screen flicker.
    4) From a general user perspective I see nothing wrong with Windows 10. I think power users tend to run into more issues than the general consumer just due to the nature of what we do whether it's the hardware or advanced features/software we use....etc.
    Reply