Intel Foundry Services gets an 1.8nm Arm Neoverse chip order — Faraday to develop 64-core Intel 18A processor with Arm Neoverse design for SoC evaluation platform

Intel
(Image credit: Intel)

Contract chip designer Faraday Technology on Monday announced plans to develop one of the industry's first 64-core processors based on Arm Neoverse technology. It will be made by Intel Foundry Services using its 18A (1.8nm-class) fabrication process. 

The new system-on-chip based on 64 Arm Neoverse cores will address a wide range of applications, including scalable hyperscale data centers, infrastructure edge, and advanced 5G networks, according to Faraday. The chip designer said that the SoC will also feature various interface IPs from the Arm Total Design ecosystem, but did not reveal which. It's logical to expect the processor to feature PCIe, CXL, and DDR5 technologies.

It should be noted that Faraday will not market the processor itself, but will offer its design to its customers, who will be able to tailor it for their needs. For now, it is not even clear whether Faraday has a potential customer, but the company seems to be confident of Arm's Neoverse technology on the Intel 18A fabrication process. These potential CPUs will be made by Intel Foundry Services and will likely be among the first Arm-based datacenter processors made by IFS.

So far, Intel Foundry Services has landed several orders for data center chips, including a cloud data center chip on Intel 3, a custom server chip for Ericsson, and Intel 18A-based chips for the U.S. Dept. of Defense. In addition, Intel assembles data center system-in-packages for Amazon Web Services.

"As a design service partner in Arm Total Design, Faraday strategically targets the most advanced technology nodes to fulfill the evolving needs of future applications," said Steve Wang, CEO of Faraday. "We are excited to announce the development of our new Arm Neoverse-based SoC platform, leveraging Intel 18A technology. This solution will benefit our ASIC and DIS (Design Implementation Service) customers, enabling them to expedite the time-to-market for cutting-edge data center and HPC applications."

Intel 18A technology relies on gate-all-around RibbonFET transistors as well as PowerVia backside power delivery. The fabrication process promises a 10% performance-per-watt improvement over Intel 20A and is expected to be particularly suitable for data center applications.

"We are pleased to work with Faraday in the development of the SoC based on Arm Neoverse CSS utilizing our most competitive Intel 18A process technology," said Stuart Pann, Intel senior vice president and general manager of Intel Foundry Services (IFS). "Our strategic collaboration with Faraday demonstrates our commitment to delivering technology and manufacturing innovation across the global semiconductor supply chain helping Faraday’s customers to seamlessly meet the world-leading power and performance standards for SoC designs."

It is noteworthy that Intel Foundry Services and Arm announced collaboration on mobile system-on-chips to be made on Intel 18A fabrication technology in April 2023. So far, the agreement has yet to bear fruits, but as it turns out, at least one contract chip designer is interested in addressing the data center market with Arm Neoverse and Intel 18A.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • bit_user
    The new system-on-chip based on 64 Arm Neoverse cores will address a wide range of applications, including scalable hyperscale data centers, infrastructure edge, and advanced 5G networks, according to Faraday.
    Given that the stated applications include edge and 5G, it's likely they're using Neoverse E-series cores. I think these haven't gotten much publicity, of late. They would presumably be derivative of Cortex-A510 or one of its successors.
    Reply
  • Pierce2623
    Will you guys ever learn that the US doesn’t have a ministry of defense?
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Pierce2623 said:
    Will you guys ever learn that the US doesn’t have a ministry of defense?
    Not only that, but the article spelled it "U.S. Ministry of Defence".
    : D
    Reply
  • Giroro
    Intel's 18A isn't 1.8nm.
    They made it very clear when they cynically changed the names of all their products to make them sound smaller that the names mean absolutely nothing.
    Please stop letting Intel trick you into confusing their product names with sizes. It was such an obvious trap that we should never let people forget.
    Reply
  • rtoaht
    Giroro said:
    Intel's 18A isn't 1.8nm.
    They made it very clear when they cynically changed the names of all their products to make them sound smaller that the names mean absolutely nothing.
    Please stop letting Intel trick you into confusing their product names with sizes. It was such an obvious trap that we should never let people forget.
    TSMC N3 isn't 3nm.
    Please stop letting TSMC trick you into confusing their product names with sizes. It was such an obvious trap that we should never let people forget.
    Reply