IT distributor lists Intel's refreshed Xeon CPUs — Xeon W3500 Sapphire Rapids Refresh chips power new Lenovo workstations

Sapphire Rapids
Sapphire Rapids (Image credit: Intel)

European IT distribution company EET Group just listed six Sapphire Rapids Refresh chips on their website, as shared on X by leaker momomo_us. These Sapphire Rapids Refresh chips all have Lenovo branding, so we could assume that these listings are for Lenovo workstations like the ThinkStation.

While Intel has yet to officially launch the Xeon W3500-series chips, which will compete with AMD’s Threadripper and Threadripper Pro processors, some companies would be eager to get their hands on the latest-generation Intel workstations, which will give them an advantage.

We previously reported on the benchmarks for these chips last February, showing the W5-3535X outperforming the fourth-gen Sapphire Rapids CPUs in multi-threaded workloads. Hardware detective momomo_us also shared the specs for the new Sapphire Rapids Refresh CPUs in the same month, showing us that the next-generation chips received at least four performance cores and a small bump in their TDPs.

Intel Xeon W3500 Series Specifications*

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Header Cell - Column 0 Cache (MB)Performance CoresProcessor Base Frequency (GHz)TDP (Watts)
Intel Xeon w5-352545163.2290
Intel Xeon w5-3535X52.5202.9300
Intel Xeon w7-354567.5242.7310
Intel Xeon w7-355575282.7325
Intel Xeon w7-3565X82.5322.5335
Intel Xeon w9-3575X97.5442.2340

*Specifications are unconfirmed.

The additional cores on these new chips will give users who rely heavily on multi-threaded workloads additional performance, but they’re still heavily outclassed by AMD offerings. The top-of-the-line Threadripper Pro 7995WX boasts 96 cores—52 more than Intel’s most expensive offering.

The 96-core AMD Threadripper Pro is far more expensive than what Intel offers, with the costly 7995WX costing at least $10,998 on Amazon, versus Intel’s current top offering, the 36-core Intel Xeon W9-3475X, a little less than $4,000. However, AMD’s closest competitor, the 32-core Threadripper Pro 7975WX, offers a more reasonable price of $3,900.

Although Intel has already launched the next-generation Emerald Rapids processors for the most demanding applications, the Sapphire Rapids Refresh Xeon W chips are designed for creative professionals. These chips give them the power they need without the extra features (and corresponding higher prices) they won’t use anyway in their applications.

Freelance News Writer
  • Metal Messiah.
    The flagship SKU is still missing in action. The 60 cores/120 threads Xeon W9-3595X HEDT CPU, sporting 112MB L3 cache. Successor to the w9-3495X.

    https://browser.geekbench.com/v6/cpu/4678570


    Hardware detective momomo_us also shared the specs for the new Sapphire Rapids Refresh CPUs in the same month, showing us that the next-generation chips received at least four performance cores and a small bump in their TDPs.

    Don't forget the extra L3 CACHE these chips sport as well, which is important. ! Also, the Xeon W9-3575X actually features an increase of 8 cores, not 4.

    The max 'boost clock' speeds of these new chips would be slightly lower than the previous 3400X series though.
    3595X vs 3495X = + 4 Cores3575X vs 3475X = + 8 Cores3565X vs 3465X = + 4 Cores3555 vs 3455 = + 4 Cores3545 vs 3445 = + 4 Cores3535X vs 3435X = + 4 Cores3525 vs 3425 = + 4 Cores
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    idk why anyone actually chooses to use XEON when EPYC exists unless its for some niche case where an application just favors intel more.

    even when latest xeon released it was after the epyc, cost more (iirc), & performed worse.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    hotaru251 said:
    idk why anyone actually chooses to use XEON when EPYC exists unless its for some niche case where an application just favors intel more.
    AMX is one thing they have which EPYC doesn't. Another is HBM, but not in the Xeon W models discussed in this article.

    I think the main reason is just that some people, companies, and organizations are just Intel shops. My employer is like that. They don't even consider anything based on AMD, because the IT department responsible for making the decisions about what hardware configurations to support isn't the one funding the hardware purchases. Those come out of the budgets of the other departments. They literally have no incentive to provide more cost-efficient options and nobody apparently cares enough to fight them over it.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    Well, DELL has now listed support for these upcoming Xeon W-3500 and also the Xeon W-2500 CPU lineup for its Precision 7960 and 5860 workstation systems.

    The company now offers drop-in upgrade for these chips via a BIOS update.

    https://www.dell.com/support/home/en-us/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=W6T3F
    https://www.dell.com/support/home/en-us/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=52RPV
    https://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/Intel-Sapphire-Rapids-Refresh-Xeon-Workstation-W3500-W2500-CPU-Lineup-Dell-BIOS-Leak-_1.png
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Metal Messiah. said:
    Well, DELL has now listed support for these upcoming Xeon W-3500 and also the Xeon W-2500 CPU lineup for its Precision 7960 and 5860 workstation systems.

    The company now offers drop-in upgrade for these chips via a BIOS update.
    FWIW, we have some Dell Precision desktops with Alder Lake CPUs, which we could not do a drop-in upgrade to Raptor Lake. Someone actually tried it and there's just a boot screen saying the CPU model isn't supported. Even with the latest BIOS.

    I think it's probably because the power subsystem of the motherboard was updated for Raptor Lake. Someone on the Dell Support forums said it's definitely tied to the motherboard model/revision, even though both have the same chipset (W680).
    Reply
  • thestryker
    I'm moderately surprised these are still launching given that we're over 6mo from EMR Xeon refresh and GNR is on the horizon. Though I suppose that may be a sign workstation GNR isn't coming for a long while and it's always possible these will be OEM only to get rid of silicon.

    Even though I don't really expect it I'm somewhat hoping that they'll lower pricing given the TR launch.
    Reply
  • TheJoker2020
    bit_user said:
    AMX is one thing they have which EPYC doesn't.
    Isn't this the new (semi)-custom AI processor they are putting into desktops but designed to actually be used to run certain "Intel only" processes much faster, but with the caveat that they need to be reprogrammed to some unknown degree because I have not heard about "AMX" in the tech press for months, and even then all they had were some intel benchmarks and TBH, I had forgotten about this AMX tech entirely.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    bit_user said:
    FWIW, we have some Dell Precision desktops with Alder Lake CPUs, which we could not do a drop-in upgrade to Raptor Lake. Someone actually tried it and there's just a boot screen saying the CPU model isn't supported. Even with the latest BIOS.

    I think it's probably because the power subsystem of the motherboard was updated for Raptor Lake. Someone on the Dell Support forums said it's definitely tied to the motherboard model/revision, even though both have the same chipset (W680).

    That's sounds odd to me, but if the Dell support rep has confirmed this then this shouldn't be an isolated case, imo. But let me check and confirm this from others as well.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Metal Messiah. said:
    That's sounds odd to me, but if the Dell support rep has confirmed this then this shouldn't be an isolated case, imo. But let me check and confirm this from others as well.
    If you want, but please don't go to any trouble on my behalf!
    : )
    I'm pretty sure this is the thread I saw, where someone had tried it.
    https://www.dell.com/community/en/conversations/precision-fixed-workstations/precision-3660-upgrading-from-12th-gen-intel-cpu-13th-gen-intel-cpu/647fa3f6f4ccf8a8de9ff62a
    Reply
  • bit_user
    TheJoker2020 said:
    Isn't this the new (semi)-custom AI processor they are putting into desktops
    No, I think what you have in mind is the NPU featured in their new Meteor Lake CPUs. AMX is something completely different and it's integrated directly into the Xeon SP and Xeon W cores, which are different (bigger) than the normal Golden Cove cores. AMX actually extends the x86 instruction set and registers to support a very small, specific subset of operations on tile data. Each of the 8 new registers is 1024 bytes (8192 bits)!

    TheJoker2020 said:
    designed to actually be used to run certain "Intel only" processes much faster, but with the caveat that they need to be reprogrammed to some unknown degree because I have not heard about "AMX" in the tech press for months,
    Intel published the details needed to use it in any software someone wants to write. It requires OS support, as well. The main software using it is probably Intel's OpenVINO AI framework, plus anything based on it or using it as a backend.
    Reply